Permits Filed: 611 Madison Avenue

611 Madison Avenue at center, image via Google Maps

The first DOB filings are up for a new building at 611 Madison Avenue, which will replace the existing 7-story townhouse. The architect of record is Fogarty Finger, while the developer appears to be the Zurich Holding Company.

Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the new permits is the fact that the future 611 Madison Avenue will have fewer floors than the current building; the replacement structure will rise six stories, and 112 feet. The height increase will be notable, and signals a shift towards higher-end retail; the entirety of the development will span 27,853 feet, with offices to be located on the top two floors.

With Fogarty Finger involved as the site’s architect, the outcome is likely to be a significant improvement from the current structure, which is a bland example of a pre-war building that also involves a seemingly forgotten rooftop component.

Fogarty Finger’s plans for the recently revealed 11-51 47th Avenue in Long Island City reveal the firm’s promising take on classic design, and it would appear likely that 611 Madison will house something similarly upscale. The location is prime, especially as the property is in the shadow of 432 Park Avenue; as 57th Street continues to evolve into a super-upscale corridor, the spillover to neighboring cross-streets is inevitable.

No completion date for 611 Madison Avenue has been announced. While permits for the existing structure’s demolition remain elusive, filings for ‘facade repairs’ were approved back in 2012, possibly as a pre-cursor to the wrecking ball.

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Posted in 611 Madison Avenue | Architecture | Fogarty Finger | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Zurich Holding Company

New Renderings: 111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

New renderings are up for JDS and PMG‘s future skyscraper at 111 West 57th Street, revealing the building’s steeply stepped vertical profile. The images are via SHoP, which is designing the tower.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

111 West 57th Street will dominate the immediate vicinity, as the renderings make clear; even One57, which stands just over 1,000 feet tall, will appear underwhelming when compared to SHoP’s creation. The skyscraper may or may not be dubbed ‘The Steinway Tower’ given the structural legacy that will be incorporated into the base of the new building.

The terracotta facade will be 111 West 57th’s defining feature, and bronze accents will further enhance its appearance; while the building’s form is contemporary, the creative adaptation of historically-minded materials transforms SHoP’s modern vision into something quintessentially Manhattan, and the design captures the essence of soaring verticality.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

The tower was discussed in a recent talk at The Skyscraper Museum, which is available on Youtube; the presentation features additional images and vantage points of the building.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street diagram, via Arch Record

Diagrams of 111 West 57th Street posted on Architectural Record give a glimpse of the tower’s internals, and indicate that the top penthouse will stand approximately 1,100 feet above street level; a mass-damper will rest above, with the remainder of the crown simply that — an aesthetic exclamation mark atop the Midtown skyline.

Completion of The Steinway Tower is expected by 2016.

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Posted in 111 West 57th Street | 57th street | Architecture | JDS Development | Midtown | New York | Property Markets Group | Residential | SHoP | Supertall

220 Central Park South Goes Supertall

220 Central Park South as of 3/21 -- photo by Andrew McKeon

EDIT: YIMBY received word that the latest filings have a clerical error, and that 220 Central Park South’s pinnacle will remain 950′.

The never-ending slew of permits from 220 Central Park South may finally be abetting as partial approvals are in place, but the latest plan exam confirms the tower’s height increase well beyond the initial figure of 920 feet; Vornado’s tower will actually stand 1,031 feet tall, placing the tower amongst the tallest in New York City, and officially giving the building ‘supertall’ status.

220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South — rendering by Neoscape

While the increase from the previous documents is a relatively minor 81 feet, the bump means that 220 Central Park South will stand slightly taller than the almost-complete One57, which measures 1,005 feet to its pinnacle. If the Robert A.M. Stern-designed building were to rise today, it would become the tallest residential building in New York City, but given the boom along 57th Street, it will rank behind 432 Park Avenue, 217 West 57th Street, and 111 West 57th Street.

Nevertheless, the latest update to the tower’s plan is a testament to the strength of the ultra-high-end market in Manhattan, and 220 Central Park South is the probable front-runner amongst the pack of ‘supertalls’ for the title of the city’s most expensive and prestigious development. Vornado’s tower has two primary advantages, which are its location and its views, and its address also guarantees that vistas will remain perpetually unobstructed.

220 Central Park South

Drawing on-site, photo by Andrew McKeon

Accompanying the latest permits is a new on-site drawing, which offers a zoomed-out look of the project; despite the lack of detail, it seems to indicate that the design has undergone some changes since the initial renderings leaked in January, via Curbed. A minor cut-out on the building’s eastern side will help enhance the views from Extell’s 217 West 57th Street, which is already cantilevering to avoid the visual impact of 220 Central Park South; the additional height of the Stern-designed skyscraper could have come from the re-configuration of that ‘missing’ square footage.

The new permits also indicate that 220 Central Park South will stand 65 floors, with 100 units in total, and completion is expected in 2016.

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Posted in 220 Central Park South | 57th street | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Supertall | Vornado

Construction Update: 432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

The latest photos of 432 Park Avenue show the tower’s core about to breach the 800 foot mark; with 600 feet to go, the skyscraper is already making a significant impact on the skyline, and it’s difficult to imagine just how tall the building is going to be.

Curbed posted a set of new renderings yesterday, as well as the floor-plan for a new $74.5 million penthouse on the 87th level that has just come onto the market. Completion of the future 1,398-foot tower is expected in 2015.

432 Park Avenue

Viewed from Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

Looking up on the corner of 57th/Park

432 Park Avenue

Base retail, viewed from 56th and Park

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue viewed from the base of Citigroup Center

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Posted in 432 Park Avenue | 57th street | Architecture | CIM | Construction Update | Macklowe | Midtown | New York | Residential | Supertall | Vinoly

Approved: 220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South -- photo by Andrew McKeon

New building permits for 220 Central Park South have been partially approved — with foundation permits fully approved — meaning the last obstacles to the tower’s rise are now out of the way. The Robert A.M. Stern-designed skyscraper is being developed by Vornado, and may take the title of New York City’s most expensive building upon its completion; renderings were revealed on Curbed in January.

220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South — photo by Andrew McKeon

The Schedule A for the project reveals few details, only indicating ‘Class A’ apartments spanning floors 7 through 64; the zoning diagram provides some additional information. The 7th level’s floor-plate will measure 7,440 feet, with averages barely shrinking as the tower rises; the uppermost stories, from 48 to 64, will each have 6,591 usable square feet of space. If the top-most penthouse is a triplex, it would total nearly 20,000 square feet.

220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South — rendering by Neoscape

It appears that the simple form of 220 Central Park South will work to the development’s advantage, as even single-floor residences will qualify as sky-mansions. In addition to the residences, the ground level will have a 461 square foot commercial component. The project will have 160 units in total.

The latest round of permits do not indicate what will happen to the part of the site that actually abuts Central Park South; the zoning diagram indicates it will become ‘open space,’ though that would be incredibly hard to imagine. It seems more likely that the current filings are for the near-supertall portion of the development, and that documents for the shorter component will be filed at a later date.

220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South, viewed from 59th Street — image from Neoscape

Indeed, renderings confirm the two-towered nature of the project, as the shorter building is visible on the right-hand side of the above image.

A formal completion date for the 950-foot structure has not been announced, but excavation is clearly beginning — and with permits approved, verticality is imminent.

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Posted in 220 Central Park South | 57th street | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Vornado

Vision: The New York Skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The future of New York City can be hard to visualize; while renderings do a decent job of depicting the city’s evolving profile, accurate images are few and far between. YIMBY stumbled upon the Instagram of Adrien Berger back in 2013, and his drawings of buildings capture details that renderings often leave out; the following images are the first of many that will illustrate the future skyline in all its supertall glory.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020; Torre Verre, 111 West 57th, One57, 217 West 57th, and 220 CPS

The first set of images are drawn from the perspective of the San Remo, looking south; the changes encompassing the Central Park skyline will be dramatic, as 57th Street develops into one of the densest corridors on the planet. From right to left, the drawing includes 220 Central Park South, 217 West 57th Street, One57, 111 West 57th Street, the Torre Verre, and 432 Park Avenue.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020 — 432 Park at left

Each of the new towers will be enormous, but collectively, they herald a new era for Manhattan; for the first time, buildings standing over 1,000 feet will become a common sight in New York City, adding another dimension to the urban plane. The developments span across the entire island, from the World Trade Center all the way to Central Park.

While Manhattan and Chicago have been the traditional homes of the skyscraper, New York is pulling away from its Midwestern second cousin in the super-tall department — and while cities in developing nations have temporarily taken the mantle for ‘supertall’ superlatives, Manhattan’s skyline may soon re-take the crown. Besides the towers rising along 57th Street, 175 and 200 Greenwich will add to the Downtown skyline, while the emerging Hudson Yards will create a new vertical forest on the Far West Side.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020 — draft

All told, there are approximately twenty towers of over 1,000 feet either proposed or under construction; New York is booming, and the market in Manhattan is entirely market driven, a feature that developing cities cannot boast. While NIMBYs have battled against new developments, the tide is turning, a point that Adrien’s illustrations drive home.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020, viewed from the Queensboro Bridge

All of Adrien’s prints — including a variety of other sketches — are for sale on his website.

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Posted in Adrian Berger | Architecture | Illustrations | Midtown | New York | Renderings | Residential | Supertall

Construction Update: 432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue has continued its rapid ascent, and the core now stands over 750 feet above 57th Street; the tower now stands among the twenty tallest buildings in New York City. The architect is Vinoly, and the developers are CIM and Macklowe.

432 Park Avenue

Looking up!

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

As the tower continues to grow, its visibility has begun to increase significantly. The Midtown plateau has an elevation of approximately 700 feet, which 432 Park Avenue now exceeds; the skyscraper is becoming obvious when viewed from Central Park, per the below photos, and will soon dominate the skyline.

432 Park Avenue

Viewed from Central Park — photo via Andrew McKeon

Completion of the 128-unit and 96-story project is expected by 2015.

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Posted in 432 Park Avenue | 57th street | Architecture | CIM | Construction Update | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Residential | Supertall | Vinoly

Approved: 217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street's 1,550' massing diagram -- via the DOB

The Nordstrom Tower finally has all the approval permits necessary for verticality; besides the Art Students League’s overwhelming vote in favor of the air-rights transfer and cantilever, the development’s journey through the Department of Buildings also appears to be finished. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill are designing the tower, while Extell is developing.

While the Art Students League vote was potentially up in the air, the DOB permits are more of a formality, given the tower is an as-of-right development. Though the ASL’s transfer of air rights seemingly confirms the vague renderings displayed during the tower’s journey through the Landmarks approval process, recent filings reveal the version that could rise to 1,550 feet, and 85 floors.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street — via the DOB

The zoning diagrams lack detail, but even without any textures, colors, or intricacies, the 1,550-foot version looks superior to the concept presented during the Landmarks process. Indeed, the drawings confirm that the model YIMBY posted back in October was accurate, though whatever does rise will likely have many changes.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street

Speculation that the presented version of 217 West 57th Street may not be final is reasonable, and the DOB drawings confirm that the tower’s design could still be up in the air. Per the latest diagrams, the tower smoothly glides to a pointed peak above the skyline; given the ante-upping design of 220 Central Park South across the street — and 111 West 57th Street, one block over — a design that is actually appealing seems much more likely than not.

Completion is expected by 2018.

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Posted in 217 West 57th Street | 225 W57th | Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill | Architecture | Construction Update | Extell | Hotel | Midtown | New York | Nordstrom | Residential | Supertall | The Nordstrom Tower

Revealed: 18 West 56th Street

18 West 56th Street's mud-splatted rendering -- photo by Andrew McKeon

Renderings have been posted for a hotel that is about to begin rising at 18 West 56th Street; the building will stand 16 stories and 196 feet tall. Stonehill & Taylor is the architectural firm of record, while Firmdale Hotels is developing the site.

Excavation is well underway, and work on the foundation is about to begin; permits for the development were partially approved in December of last year. With 86 rooms, 18 West 56th Street’s closest comparison may actually on the other end of the island, as Stonehill & Taylor and Firmdale also worked together on the Crosby Street Hotel in SoHo, which has a similar aesthetic.

Firmdale’s latest addition is quite promising; for starters, the exterior will be flush with the existing street-wall. Enormous casement windows will dominate, and while the facade material remains mysterious, the design seems to offer a historical take on the ‘industrial chic’ aesthetic — a combination that is undervalued. Visually, 18 West 56th Street will be far superior to surrounding buildings, and the development will be a positive influence on a Midtown block that remains relatively dingy.

18 West 56th Street

Excavation at 18 West 56th Street — photo by Andrew McKeon

The rendering of 18 West 56th Street also shares similarities with the nearby Viceroy — designed by Roman & Williams — at 120 West 57th Street. Together, the developments represent a concerted push to design hotels that actually look nice, with proximity to ‘Billionaire’s Row’ likely a driving factor. Positive externalities of the 57th Street boom are often ignored, but an increase in the quality of the neighborhood’s new buildings is definitely noticeable.

Details remain lacking — and mud splattered across the rendering does not help — but at least the project is progressing. Completion is expected in the fall of 2015.

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Posted in 18 West 56th Street | 18-22 West 56th Street | 57th street | Architecture | Construction Update | Firmdale Hotels | Hotel | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Stonehill and Taylor

Art Students League Set to Vote on 217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street -- image via the ASL/Extell

The Art Students League is set to vote on the transfer of air rights to Extell’s Nordstrom Tower, set to rise at 217 West 57th Street. The League has a total of 6,000 square feet available, and 217 West 57th Street will cantilever 30 feet over the ASL’s roof — another aspect of Extell’s plan that could be axed by a ‘no’ vote. Curbed has an audio tape on the subject as well as a barrage of letters from both sides of the debate.

In the report supporting Extell’s plans, several League members endorse the cantilever, noting that the sale of air rights will provide much needed funding for the ASL. The League stands to gain $25.8 million if the transaction is approved; the vote is set for February 12th, so action is imminent.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street — image via the ASL/Extell

ASL Members have also opposed the tower. The public push for approval is recent, and another group is attempting to bring in lawyers to stall the vote, decrying construction risks and potential shadows. 217 West 57th Street’s cantilever will begin at 290 feet above street level, protruding 30 feet over the ASL’s roof — but shadow studies have indicated its impact on light will be minimal.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street — image via the ASL/Extell

While the debate is contentious, the option to cantilever was approved by the Landmarks Commission in October, so the only obstacle to Extell’s plans would be a ‘no’ vote by the ASL’s body. Schematics from the ASL’s pro-sale group depict what the Nordstrom Tower would look like if that were to happen, and the differences would be minimal; the building would gain slightly over 100 feet, while its profile would slim down.

Of course, the released ‘renderings’ come with a caveat; the designs and massing are preliminary, so the tower’s appearance could still see dramatic changes. The only thing Extell had to get approval for was the cantilever — everything else is still up in the air, since 217 West 57th Street is an as-of-right development.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street — image via the ASL/Extell

Whether the Art Students League votes for or against the project, it’s still going to be built, and — with or without the cantilever — it will be enormous.

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Posted in 217 West 57th Street | 57th street | Architecture | Extell | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Nordstrom | Residential | Supertall | The Nordstrom Tower

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