Permits Filed: 802 Myrtle Avenue

802 Myrtle Avenue Aerial, via Google Earth

The first permits are up for 802 Myrtle Avenue in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, which ‘Bright Villas LLC’ is developing. While the actual developer is unknown, the DOB filings come one day after permits were issued for 75 Ralph Avenue — also in Bed-Stuy,  – and both projects feature Charles Mallea as the architect of record, which may or may not be a simple coincidence.

802 Myrtle Avenue

802 Myrtle Avenue via Google Maps

The filings indicate that 802 Myrtle Avenue will span 31,201 square feet, with a 76 square foot commercial component to be located in the project’s cellar, giving it the smallest claim to ‘mixed-use’ possible. The remainder of the building will have 46 residences, spanning eight stories; the structure will stand 94 feet in total, and ceiling heights will be surprisingly generous compared to typical new developments in the neighborhood.

While much of Bedford-Stuyvesant is dominated by pre-war architecture, the vicinity of 802 Myrtle Avenue was decimated during the time of Robert Moses, and the Marcy Houses are located directly across the street. Positive changes are gradually occurring across the entire neighborhood, and developments like 802 Myrtle will go a long ways towards bettering the area’s reputation, which has typically revolved around the negative press surrounding its public housing.

Regardless of the potential design for 802 Myrtle, its effect will be a major positive for a block that has been on the outs until recently. Politicians may lack the motivation to fix systemic issues that plague the neighborhood, but if Bed-Stuy is to regain a sense of its pre-Moses vitality, piecemeal development is definitely a good start.

No completion date for 802 Myrtle has been announced.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 802 Myrtle Avenue | Architecture | New York | Residential

Permits Filed: 75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue -- via Google Maps

The first DOB filings are up for a six-story residential development at 75 Ralph Avenue, in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood; the developer is Solomon Feder of 75 Ralph LLC, and the architect is Charles Mallea. An existing laundromat on-site will be demolished to make way for the new structure, with permits for its demise issued late last month.

75 Ralph Avenue

75 Ralph Avenue — via Google Maps

While Mallea’s site lacks renderings of 75 Ralph Avenue, Curbed has a reveal of another development the architect is involved with, at 482 Seneca Avenue in Ridgewood. If that project is any indication, Mallea’s Bed-Stuy building may tend towards a bland-contemporary aesthetic.

Bed-Stuy is home to an extensive amount of pre-war architecture, and something at 75 Ralph Avenue that considers the neighborhood context would be ideal, if unlikely. Regardless of the design, a nearly-vacant lot will still be transformed into much-needed housing, resulting in a net-positive for the surrounding area.

Permits indicate that 75 Ralph Avenue will measure 38,462 square feet, and the entirety of the structure will be residential; the building will be split between 57 units, and it will stand 69 feet tall.

Massey Knakal has a PDF indicating the development site had an asking price of $3.9 million. No completion date has been announced.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 75 Ralph Avenue | Architecture | Bedford Stuyvesant | Brooklyn | Charles Mallea Architect | New York | Residential

Revealed: 8-16 Nevins Street

8-16 Nevins Street, image via The SBJ Group

The first renderings up for a new residential project at 8-16 Nevins Street in Downtown Brooklyn, which Bushburg Properties is developing; the reveal comes from the building’s architect, the Stephen B. Jacobs Group, which posted the renderings to the firm’s website. The Real Deal first reported on Bushburg’s acquisition last September, when the two lots that comprise the site were bought for $16.3 million.

While no permits have been filed, the existing structures are apparently occupied by tenants with short-term leases, and demolition will be simple. Despite the lack of DOB filings, The SBJ Group’s page on the development gives all the necessary details, and indicates the tower will total 135,000 gross square feet, split between 136 apartments, in addition to ground-floor retail. Bushburg’s high-rise will also include an affordable component, allowing the developer to build beyond the lot’s potential under current zoning, which would otherwise limit its scope to 90,000 square feet.

8-16 Nevins Street

8-16 Nevins Street, image via The SBJ Group

8-16 Nevins Street will stand 25 stories in total, and amenities will include a rooftop lounge. The building will be topped by a “metal mesh clad bulkhead [which] glows at night with the use of LED lighting.”

SBJ has a great track record, and the firm has a slew of projects currently in the works across the New York City region; their work on Glenwood’s towers that are rising as part of the Fordham redevelopment prove the firm’s versatility, as those buildings are relatively classical cousins to the decidedly contemporary scheme for 8-16 Nevins Street.

Brooklyn’s skyline is lacking in nighttime icons, and 8-16 Nevins Street will further enhance the developing Downtown area; the LED lighting atop the tower will be similar to the scheme that was recently deployed at 388 Bridge Street, and hopefully more of the new high-rises will employ dazzling visuals. While some may consider the LEDs to be gimmick-y, their presence will distinguish the DoBro skyline from its comparatively boring counterparts in Long Island City and New Jersey.

The vertical elements of 8-16 Nevins may be the most obvious, but its presence at the street-level will also present an improvement to Downtown Brooklyn; as SBJ’s website notes, the site provides ”the opportunity to establish a pedestrian connection between Grove Place and Nevins Street in the hope of activating the urbanistically significant alley.”

No completion date has been announced, but given the recent acquisition of the site, construction appears to be imminent.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 8-16 Nevins Street | Architecture | Brooklyn | Bushburg Properties | DoBro | New York | Renderings | Residential | SBJ Group

Interview: Market Trends with Douglas Elliman’s Clifford Finn

Go East! Long Island City and Brooklyn are booming.

YIMBY sat down with Clifford Finn, Executive Vice President of Douglas Elliman’s new development marketing team, to discuss his thoughts regarding what’s up and coming in New York City, the latest happenings in NoMAD, and the continued ramifications of Hurricane Sandy. YIMBY in bold.

Have you heard anything about Journal Square, and do you see it becoming more like Downtown Jersey City or Long Island City? How quickly is it going to develop?

It’s interesting. You know, in the past, Jersey City was more of a suburban mentality; that goes for the people building there, and the audience that was going there. Although many Manhattanites found their way there, a wide audience was filling those buildings; it was a little bit different than crossing the other rivers. But that’s changing, because now everybody is looking there due to the increase in land costs. Brooklyn is not a huge discount to Manhattan anymore, and Long Island City is not far behind it; everybody is looking for the next great, convenient, commutable destination, and they are setting their sights back on Jersey City and the surrounding area.

Journal Squared

Journal Squared – image via Handel Architects

Moving back to Manhattan, YIMBY attended 1182 Broadway’s opening, which is a converted building in NoMAD; what are some features that make conversions in NoMAD stand apart from new developments in the neighborhood, and what’s special about The Centurian?

In the past, conversions of this type were typically larger buildings that go condo — like 10 Madison Square West. But for rent, you either had the Sixth Avenue high-rises and the few hot buildings off that corridor, or much older conversion stock that doesn’t have the luxury standard of today’s market. And I think what sets The Centurian apart from the rest is that it’s rental, but was built with a condominium sensibility and comparable finishes.

The Centurian

The Centurian — image from the Museum of the City of New York

It seems geared towards wealthy bachelors in technology.

Well, some units were; on the typical floor-plates before you get to the upper, larger apartments, we have two loft-style layouts that don’t have a formal bedroom. And then we have two [layouts] that have formal bedrooms, and they’re all similar in size. So I think it’s not just about singles; definitely couples too, and more established people. In that neighborhood, we’re seeing a cross-section of different types of people; it really speaks to a lot of audiences.

And do you think the broad appeal of NoMAD heralds its emergence as one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city?

I think that it’s one of them, because there’s a lot of similarities between NoMAD and neighborhoods like SoHo and Tribeca — but you have a park, and you’re more centrally located. It’s convenient to Midtown, Uptown, and Downtown, and it’s a great spot if you have to get out of the city quickly because it’s so close to the bridges and tunnels. You’re a little bit more centrally located, but you still have the flavor and feel that you’re not in Midtown.

1165 Broadway

A new building set for 1165 Broadway — image from Spector Group

Where would you say the neighborhood’s boundaries are? Because it’s still emerging.

Madison Square Park ends at 26th Street, so up to about 30th. I think once you cross 30th it gets much more Midtown-like. And then down to 23rd Street; below 23rd people consider it to be Flatiron. And it extends between Broadway and Park Avenue.

Sandy devastated sections of the city; do you see prices being affected in areas like the West Village and the Seaport, if measures to mitigate future events are not taken? If there is another event, do you think the double-whammy could result in a sustained drop in prices?

Not in the immediate future, I mean I myself live in a Zone 1 neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, and it didn’t affect the market for those neighborhoods at all.

But if there was another one?

I think it depends on if they get worse. I think that everybody feels like what happened was very inconvenient, but there was nothing truly devastating. I think the Seaport was much more affected, and that neighborhood is a little more sensitive to future impacts than the West Side. We have a lot of projects that are in flood zones, and plans have remained the same, it’s just that some components have been elevated. And that’s the way things need to be moving forward; you have to build for the tide to go through the property, and not disrupt the tower. We have to build to accommodate; I don’t think people are scared as long as they know that the issues are being addressed.

What about insurance companies?

It’s hard; again, I’m in a Zone 1 building, and our insurance premiums doubled. And that’s unfortunate, but if you have a house on the ocean, it’s a risk you take to be on the ocean. And it’s the same with living in these prime neighborhoods.

As prices in Manhattan rise, Brooklyn and Queens are becoming go-to destinations for luxury real estate. What do you see in the future for Downtown Brooklyn and Long Island City; will the impending development boom keep prices steady, given the amount of supply that will soon be coming online?

No, prices are climbing, and I think they’ll continue to rise. Everything that we’ve been touching has been climbing, and I believe that the bulk of the rental marketplace out there is really what isn’t being built in Manhattan, so it’s not like it’s in addition to anything going up in Manhattan — so there isn’t an abundance of new product. Those price-points won’t exist in brand-new developments on the island, so people have to go to Queens and Brooklyn for these buildings, and I don’t see supply hitting demand — at least in any of the studies we’ve looked at. And the discount, even with future conservative growth, is respectable.

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

What about Harlem? It seems like people neglect it even though prices there are also increasing.

I think people focus on where the obvious discounts are, and when those go away, they set their sites on the next ones. It’s like Bushwick; is that the next one? No, now it’s Bensonhurst. It keeps moving farther out, and farther up; everything is cyclical. I think people were hot on Harlem a few years ago; people caught on, then the obvious discounts were gone, so the momentum shifted elsewhere. But now everything has elevated, and they are re-visiting Harlem, because what might have not seemed like a discount previously is now well-priced. I think we’re going to see a lot of movement in East Harlem in particular.

But what about all the public housing? Don’t you think that will prevent revitalization?

Yes and no. Anything that’s a destination — a building’s presence will overshadow that. I think people in New York City are accustomed to public housing being all around them. If you look at the West Side, you have the Amsterdam Houses by Lincoln Center; twenty or thirty years ago, you would never walk around back there. But now, it is completely surrounded on all four sides with extremely expensive luxury housing, and neighborhoods that didn’t exist back then. I think people are accepting, and if it’s a neighborhood on the verge, people are likely to take the discount. You don’t have to twist anybody’s arm to buy near the Amsterdam Houses today.

So, finally: If you could pick the top three neighborhoods to invest in today, which would they be?

I think one of the best — and I’m not just saying this because we have a building going up there — but I think Inwood is one of the very few sleeper neighborhoods still around, and I really like it. I still think, for different reasons, that FiDi is still comparatively undervalued. You’re starting to see the trickle-down effect from the Village and SoHo, as it heads Downtown. With North FiDi, especially; all those buildings on the border of Tribeca.

Like 56 Leonard?

Yes, 56 Leonard, 101 Leonard; they’re on Broadway, or Worth, or Leonard. They’re at the cross-roads of entering the Financial District, and we’re seeing those numbers shoot up. And as we see businesses populating the World Trade Center — plus the Fulton Center and the new malls — basically they’re going through the process of building an infrastructure that never existed Downtown, so that it can compete with other residential neighborhoods. It always catered to the business community, and I think the FiDi has been around for long enough as a residential destination that we’re just now seeing the makings of a true residential area in terms of amenities. So I like it for those reasons; it still has a lot of room to grow.

It would be difficult to pinpoint a neighborhood in Brooklyn, but I love Gowanus; I think it’s like a case-study.

56 Leonard

56 Leonard

Have you been there?

Yes, we’re working on projects there. The thing about Gowanus is that it’s the epicenter of many other neighborhoods. It’s between Carroll Gardens and Park Slope, which are two fabulous neighborhoods.

Isn’t it centered on a toxic canal?

For many years the canal was toxic and polluted, and not very attractive –

So it’s basically like Greenpoint-lite.

Yes, but that’s changing; it’s being cleaned-up and redeveloped. There is a population of young artists and creative types that have been living in that area, and it’s been one of those sleeper neighborhoods for a long time. And as pricing continues to escalate in adjacent established neighborhoods, Gowanus is on the verge of major change.

And why has it remained so undervalued; the pollution?

Well because it had a very old stigma attached to it because of the canal, so people stayed away. But at this point we’re out of land, and it’s there, and it is a very good location — and the pollution is being addressed, and re-mediation has been ongoing for years, though it has not been obvious to people. But it’s really on the way. And Whole Foods is opening a Gowanus location, and I think that says a lot.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 1182 Broadway | Clifford Finn | DoBro | Douglas Elliman | Downtown | FiDi | Gowanus | Jersey City | Journal Square | Long Island City | Midtown | New York | Residential | The Centurian

Revealed: 22 Caton Place

22 Caton Place -- image from Kiss + Cathcart Architects

A fresh rendering is up for 22 Caton Place, in Brooklyn; the project will stand seven stories tall, and have 73 units. The architect of record is Kiss + Cathcart, and The Hudson Companies Inc. is the site’s developer. Curbed featured a glimpse of the building back in February of 2013, which also included a new rendering for 23 Caton Place, a stalled site across the street.

22 Caton Place

22 Caton Place — image from Kiss + Cathcart Architects

22 Caton Place is located in Windsor Terrace, to the southwest of Prospect Park, and the area is seeing a surge in construction; Brownstoner reported on 33 Caton Place last Tuesday, which was also just revealed, and will add an additional 126 units to the neighborhood. As the vicinity of Prospect Park becomes increasingly expensive, the surge in development is to be expected.

Aesthetically, 22 Caton Place looks to be above-average, and will enhance the urban feel of Windsor Terrace with the creation of a street-wall. Per Kiss + Cathcart, the “articulated brick façade is enhanced with vine covered balconies and is contextual within the neighborhood,” and renderings confirm the architect’s description of the project.

In addition to its contextual appearance, 22 Caton Place will incorporate environmentally-friendly features, and is aiming for LEED-Gold certification. The entirety of the development will measure 86,000 square feet, and per Kiss + Cathcart’s PDF on the project, completion is expected this year.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 22 Caton Place | Architecture | Brooklyn | Kiss + Cathcart Architects | New York | Residential | The Hudson Companies Inc.

Construction Update: City Tech, 285 Jay Street

City Tech -- 285 Jay Street

The redevelopment of the New York City College of Technology’s Klitgord Center at 285 Jay Street is making significant progress; demolition of the old structure is complete, and excavation for the replacement 8-story building is well underway. The school is colloquially known as City Tech, and its newest addition will span 365,000 square feet in total; Perkins Eastman is the architect of record.

City Tech -- 285 Jay Street

City Tech — 285 Jay Street

Located at the corner of Jay and Tillary Streets, City Tech’s expansion promises to activate a sliver of Downtown Brooklyn that has remained relatively desolate. Student populations are prone to inducing 24-hour activity on streets, and creating neighborhoods that actually feel alive; while City Tech’s continued growth is a boon for DoBro, incentivizing additional academic-centric development would further enhance pedestrian activity.

City Tech -- 285 Jay Street

City Tech — 285 Jay Street, excavation proceeding

City Tech’s newest building will have a range of facilities; via Perkins’ Eastman, it will “predominantly house laboratories, classrooms, faculty offices, clinic and support spaces,” in addition to “student life/recreation areas, a 1,000-seat auditorium, and [an] 800-seat spectator gymnasium.”

The new 285 Jay Street will offer a comprehensive program for City Tech’s students, and while the building’s design may be slightly awkward, its effect on the neighborhood will be beneficial. Besides the project’s cantilever — which heralds the trend’s arrival in Brooklyn — an awkward orange semi-cylinder will be integrated into the structure’s first floor. While the City Tech building will be ‘educational,’ the apparent homage to Fisher Price may be lost on college-aged students.

City Tech -- 285 Jay Street

City Tech — 285 Jay Street

Completion of 285 Jay Street is expected in the spring of 2017.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Academic | Architecture | Brooklyn | City Tech | Construction Update | DoBro | New York | Perkins Eastman

Construction Update: 81 Fleet Place

81 Fleet Place

Construction is making rapid progress at 81 Fleet Place in Downtown Brooklyn, where a 15-story residential building is now rising. The architect of record is Dattner, and billionaire John Catsimatidis’ Red Apple Group is developing the site.

81 Fleet Place

81 Fleet Place

An on-site rendering of the project reveals a fairly typical design, and the facade will be a mix of brick and glass. Permits indicate the development’s first floor will be dedicated to retail, with 13,000 square feet of space; after a setback, the residential portion rises above, and 81 Fleet Place will have a total of 205 units, spanning 159,785 square feet.

Curbed posted additional renderings of the site back in 2012, which give a better look at the project’s L-shaped configuration. Catsimatidis — whose name even the DOB permits mis-spell — owns several lots in the neighborhood, and 81 Fleet Place will be the first of three new developments to rise in the vicinity.

Red Apple’s additional neighborhood projects include a 213-unit building at 180 Myrtle Avenue, and an as-yet unannounced tower at 86 Fleet Place, which will be the tallest of the group.

81 Fleet Place

81 Fleet Place

Per the on-site signage, completion of 81 Fleet Place is expected by the end of this year, though given the current level of progress, a 2015 opening date may be more realistic.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 81 Fleet Place | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | DoBro | John Catsimatidis | New York | Red Apple Group | Residential

Construction Update: City Point

City Point -- phase II retail & residential

Work is progressing quickly at City Point in Downtown Brooklyn, which promises to bring the most dramatically positive change of any new project in the neighborhood. The second phase is well underway, and will deliver additional retail space, as well as two residential towers. The site’s architect is COOKFOX, and the developers are Acadia Realty Trust and Washington Square Partners.

Phase I of City Point has already activated one sliver of the site, with 50,000 square feet of retail; phase II will add another 650,000 square feet for shoppers, and while Downtown Brooklyn has long been a retail hub — with Fulton Mall at its center — the neighborhood lacks Class-A space, which is a void that City Point will fill.

City Point

City Point

While the most crucial component of the development is its retail presence, work on the residential towers is also progressing, with concrete and structural steel beginning to rise above the retail base. Phase II’s apartment buildings will stand 19 and 30 stories, with 690 units between them; the stacking plan has additional details.

City Point

City Point

Phase III remains elusive, with details unconfirmed; the site may host the tallest tower in Brooklyn, and early renderings depicted a skyscraper that would soar over 700 feet in height. An on-site rendering — placed where phase III would ultimately rise – possibly reveals the borough’s tallest tower.

City Point

City Point — possible rendering of phase III

No date for the commencement of phase III has been announced, but the entirety of the site will likely be built-out before 2020.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Albee Development | Architecture | Brooklyn | Citypoint | Construction Update | Cook + Fox Architects | DoBro | New York | Office | Residential | Retail

Revealed: 140 Schermerhorn Street

140 Schermerhorn Street

An on-site rendering has been posted for 140 Schermerhorn Street, a major mixed-use structure in Downtown Brooklyn, where excavation is beginning. While the glimpse isn’t exactly comprehensive, it still provides a general idea of the building’s ultimate appearance. The architect of record is Goldstein Hill & West, while Crain’s reports that Flank Development and The Carlyle Group are behind the project.

Permits – which were approved on the 18th — indicate the development will stand 19 stories; it will have a mix of hotel, retail, residential, and community space, though the bulk of the building will be dedicated to apartments, with 140 units in total. 140 Schermerhorn Street will measure 210 feet to the highest occupied floor.

Breaking down the components by square footage, 213,181 square feet will be devoted to the residences, 99,245 square feet will be dedicated to commercial usage, and 94,202 square feet will be occupied by the community facilities. The entirety of the development will measure 406,628 square feet, with an overall FAR of 10.54. Ground floor retail will yield to a hotel that will span floors three through six, while apartments will occupy the upper levels, per the Schedule A.

140 Schermerhorn Street

140 Schermerhorn Street — equipment on-site

Despite its relatively basic appearance, 140 Schermerhorn will add significant heft to the neighborhood, and its variety of uses will be beneficial to the vicinity. The rendering indicates that the project should also conform to the existing street-walls; while the exact details of the overall design remain unclear, it will be a major gain for Downtown Brooklyn, in terms of enhancing pedestrian vibrancy. Completion is expected in the spring of 2016.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 140 Schermerhorn Street | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | DoBro | Goldstein Hill West | Hotel | New York | Residential

Permits Filed: 1 John Street

1 John Street -- image from Alloy/Monadnock

The first permits for 1 John Street have been filed; the 12-story building will rise adjacent to Brooklyn Bridge Park, and will have a total of 42 condominiums. Alloy Development and Monadnock Development are behind the project, with an in-house team at Alloy responsible for the structure’s design.

Brooklyn Bridge Park Corporation announced a design contest for the site in late 2012, and the Alloy/Monadnock partnership emerged as the winner last July. 1 John Street’s scope is relatively minor, with 123,000 square feet of space, but its impact on the Brooklyn waterfront will be significant, given its prominent location.

1 John Street

1 John Street — image from Alloy/Monadnock

In addition to condominiums, DOB permits indicate 1 John Street will have 3,000 square feet of commercial space, as well as 2,551 feet of space to be used by The Brooklyn Children’s Museum. Brooklyn Bridge Park is emerging as one of the borough’s prime destinations for locals and tourists alike, and incorporating pedestrian-friendly amenities into adjacent new developments is crucial to enhancing the neighborhood’s vibrancy.

The windows of 1 John Street will have enormous panes, which will rival the top luxury buildings coming online in Manhattan; comparisons include the Adjmi + Andreoli-designed 11 North Moore, and Vinoly’s 432 Park Avenue. As views of Manhattan are guaranteed to last forever, the glassy exterior is definitely warranted; grey-brick will round out the facade, giving it a traditional touch.

1 John Street

1 John Street — image from Alloy/Monadnock

Completion of 1 John Street is expected in late 2015.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 1 John Street | Alloy | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | DUMBO | Monadnock Development | New York | Residential

YIMBY News

You have been reading YIMBY for 60 seconds.

That’s the time it takes to read our Saturday newsletter, which summarizes the week’s TOP 5 stories.