Demolition Update: 45 East 22nd Street

45 East 22nd Street -- demolition as of July

Demolition is now complete at 45 East 22nd Street, paving the way for construction to begin on the future 64-story building; Bruce Eichner of Continuum is developing, and Kohn Pedersen Fox is the architect.

The 372,684 square-foot building will have 83 units, and while pricing has not been released, numbers will likely be astronomical, especially given Related’s results at One Madison. 45 East 22nd Street will stand 150 feet taller than One Madison, topping-out 777 feet above 22nd Street.

41 East 22nd Street

45 East 22nd Street, image by KPF

Financing for the site remains undisclosed, but given the ongoing demand for super-luxe residences, 45 East 22nd Street would seem well-positioned for imminent verticality. While 57th Street and Lower Manhattan have several similar proposals in the works or under construction, the area surrounding Madison Square Park is bare of comparisons outside of One Madison and Eichner’s tower, which would seem to brighten prospects.

45 East 22nd Street

45 East 22nd Street — demolition progress as of April

The structures that formerly occupied the site came down one by one over the past few months, and shots during demolition — April above, June below — show how quickly removal occurred.

45 East 22nd Street

45 East 22nd Street — demolition progress as of June

Per Curbed, completion of 45 East 22nd Street is slated for 2016; while the target seems slightly ambitious, it would also herald excavation beginning in the very near future.

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Posted in 41 East 22nd Street | 43 East 22nd Street | 45 East 22nd Street | Architecture | Bruce Eichner | Construction Update | Continuum Company | Kohn Pedersen Fox | Midtown | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South is inching closer to completion, and glass is making significant headway on the building, which Toll Brothers City Living is developing; the project’s architect is Christian de Portzamparc.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

A new Youtube video highlights Portzamparc’s involvement with the project, and describes the process behind the tower’s design — noting its inspirations and origins, which are based on the architect’s own LVMH Building, on 57th Street. Even the community board loved the tower’s appearance, which has been heralded as transformative, and has luckily survived intact since initial conception back in the 2000s.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

In terms of construction, glass is slowly wrapping its way along and up the structure, and has almost encircled the building to its pinnacle, 476 feet above the street. The jagged angles of the facade result in dazzling reflections from all perspectives, but the vantage point immediately to the project’s northeast — at the corner of 28th Street and Park Avenue — is perhaps the most entrancing.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

Toll Brothers City Living has been on a recent building spree in the neighborhood, and the firm’s 160 East 22nd Street – also nearing completion — is just a few blocks to the southeast. Immediately across the street, 404 Park Avenue South is also approaching its opening day, and demand for new construction is at a fever pitch across all of Gramercy.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South stands 42 stories in total, and will have 365 units, which will be split between rentals on lower floors and condominiums above. Completion is expected next year.

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Posted in 160 East 22nd Street | 400 Park Avenue South | 404 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Gramercy | Midtown | New York | Portzamparc | Residential | Toll Brothers

Renderings Revealed: 41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street's pinnacle, image by KPF

After last week’s post on the latest DOB filings at 41 East 22nd Street, a tipster passed along additional documents, complete with renderings, that reveal the full scope of the project. The site’s developer is Continuum — headed by Bruce Eichner — and the architects are Kohn Pederson Fox and Goldstein Hill & West.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, image by KPF

While the previous drawings were comprehensive, the new renderings offer significantly clearer details on the skyscraper, which will become the tallest building between Midtown and Lower Manhattan. Plans may have undergone slight revisions since the included images were conceived in November, but they appear to be very similar to the most recent DOB filings. The tower will eventually stand 60 stories and 777 feet tall.

41 East 22nd Street

Different angle of the project, image via KPF

Per the tipster, the concept for 41 East 22nd Street has undergone a series of evolutions, and the tower has gained height during the design process. KPF’s hand is evident, and the scheme bears similarities to the firm’s similarly glassy and jagged creations at Related’s Hudson Yards development.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street’s base, image via KPF

Perhaps the tower’s most striking element — besides its sheer height — is the cantilever, arching over neighboring buildings to the west. The ‘champagne glass’ has clearly been refined, but the base definitely resembles a stem, fluting upwards into the structure’s residential floors.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, base diagram

Glass dominates the vast majority of the exterior, but the amenity-laden base is actually clad in masonry; the new drawings note that the “design [is] pending confirmation,” but as the renderings make clear, there will be a marked contrast between the podium’s facade and the rest of the building.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, profile diagram

Despite the stone exterior, the base will still have enormous windows looking out onto 22nd Street, and the lobby of 41 East 22nd Street will be an experience unto itself. With One Madison located down the block, the neighborhood offers ample competition in terms of condominium product, but it would appear that Eichner’s 81-unit development is poised to take the super-luxe crown for all of Lower Manhattan.

Roof Diagram -- image by KPF

Roof Diagram — image by KPF

While no completion date has been announced, demolition of the existing structures is now underway.

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Posted in 41 East 22nd Street | 43 East 22nd Street | Architecture | Bruce Eichner | Continuum Company | Flatiron | Goldstein Hill West | Kohn Pedersen Fox | Midtown | New York | Renderings | Residential

Interview: Market Trends with Douglas Elliman’s Clifford Finn

ESB's view, East New York in distance.

YIMBY sat down with Clifford Finn, Executive Vice President of Douglas Elliman’s new development marketing team, to discuss his thoughts regarding what’s up and coming in New York City, the latest happenings in NoMAD, and the continued ramifications of Hurricane Sandy. YIMBY in bold.

Have you heard anything about Journal Square, and do you see it becoming more like Downtown Jersey City or Long Island City? How quickly is it going to develop?

It’s interesting. You know, in the past, Jersey City was more of a suburban mentality; that goes for the people building there, and the audience that was going there. Although many Manhattanites found their way there, a wide audience was filling those buildings; it was a little bit different than crossing the other rivers. But that’s changing, because now everybody is looking there due to the increase in land costs. Brooklyn is not a huge discount to Manhattan anymore, and Long Island City is not far behind it; everybody is looking for the next great, convenient, commutable destination, and they are setting their sights back on Jersey City and the surrounding area.

Journal Squared

Journal Squared – image via Handel Architects

Moving back to Manhattan, YIMBY attended 1182 Broadway’s opening, which is a converted building in NoMAD; what are some features that make conversions in NoMAD stand apart from new developments in the neighborhood, and what’s special about The Centurian?

In the past, conversions of this type were typically larger buildings that go condo — like 10 Madison Square West. But for rent, you either had the Sixth Avenue high-rises and the few hot buildings off that corridor, or much older conversion stock that doesn’t have the luxury standard of today’s market. And I think what sets The Centurian apart from the rest is that it’s rental, but was built with a condominium sensibility and comparable finishes.

The Centurian

The Centurian — image from the Museum of the City of New York

It seems geared towards wealthy bachelors in technology.

Well, some units were; on the typical floor-plates before you get to the upper, larger apartments, we have two loft-style layouts that don’t have a formal bedroom. And then we have two [layouts] that have formal bedrooms, and they’re all similar in size. So I think it’s not just about singles; definitely couples too, and more established people. In that neighborhood, we’re seeing a cross-section of different types of people; it really speaks to a lot of audiences.

And do you think the broad appeal of NoMAD heralds its emergence as one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city?

I think that it’s one of them, because there’s a lot of similarities between NoMAD and neighborhoods like SoHo and Tribeca — but you have a park, and you’re more centrally located. It’s convenient to Midtown, Uptown, and Downtown, and it’s a great spot if you have to get out of the city quickly because it’s so close to the bridges and tunnels. You’re a little bit more centrally located, but you still have the flavor and feel that you’re not in Midtown.

1165 Broadway

A new building set for 1165 Broadway — image from Spector Group

Where would you say the neighborhood’s boundaries are? Because it’s still emerging.

Madison Square Park ends at 26th Street, so up to about 30th. I think once you cross 30th it gets much more Midtown-like. And then down to 23rd Street; below 23rd people consider it to be Flatiron. And it extends between Broadway and Park Avenue.

Sandy devastated sections of the city; do you see prices being affected in areas like the West Village and the Seaport, if measures to mitigate future events are not taken? If there is another event, do you think the double-whammy could result in a sustained drop in prices?

Not in the immediate future, I mean I myself live in a Zone 1 neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, and it didn’t affect the market for those neighborhoods at all.

But if there was another one?

I think it depends on if they get worse. I think that everybody feels like what happened was very inconvenient, but there was nothing truly devastating. I think the Seaport was much more affected, and that neighborhood is a little more sensitive to future impacts than the West Side. We have a lot of projects that are in flood zones, and plans have remained the same, it’s just that some components have been elevated. And that’s the way things need to be moving forward; you have to build for the tide to go through the property, and not disrupt the tower. We have to build to accommodate; I don’t think people are scared as long as they know that the issues are being addressed.

What about insurance companies?

It’s hard; again, I’m in a Zone 1 building, and our insurance premiums doubled. And that’s unfortunate, but if you have a house on the ocean, it’s a risk you take to be on the ocean. And it’s the same with living in these prime neighborhoods.

As prices in Manhattan rise, Brooklyn and Queens are becoming go-to destinations for luxury real estate. What do you see in the future for Downtown Brooklyn and Long Island City; will the impending development boom keep prices steady, given the amount of supply that will soon be coming online?

No, prices are climbing, and I think they’ll continue to rise. Everything that we’ve been touching has been climbing, and I believe that the bulk of the rental marketplace out there is really what isn’t being built in Manhattan, so it’s not like it’s in addition to anything going up in Manhattan — so there isn’t an abundance of new product. Those price-points won’t exist in brand-new developments on the island, so people have to go to Queens and Brooklyn for these buildings, and I don’t see supply hitting demand — at least in any of the studies we’ve looked at. And the discount, even with future conservative growth, is respectable.

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

What about Harlem? It seems like people neglect it even though prices there are also increasing.

I think people focus on where the obvious discounts are, and when those go away, they set their sites on the next ones. It’s like Bushwick; is that the next one? No, now it’s Bensonhurst. It keeps moving farther out, and farther up; everything is cyclical. I think people were hot on Harlem a few years ago; people caught on, then the obvious discounts were gone, so the momentum shifted elsewhere. But now everything has elevated, and they are re-visiting Harlem, because what might have not seemed like a discount previously is now well-priced. I think we’re going to see a lot of movement in East Harlem in particular.

But what about all the public housing? Don’t you think that will prevent revitalization?

Yes and no. Anything that’s a destination — a building’s presence will overshadow that. I think people in New York City are accustomed to public housing being all around them. If you look at the West Side, you have the Amsterdam Houses by Lincoln Center; twenty or thirty years ago, you would never walk around back there. But now, it is completely surrounded on all four sides with extremely expensive luxury housing, and neighborhoods that didn’t exist back then. I think people are accepting, and if it’s a neighborhood on the verge, people are likely to take the discount. You don’t have to twist anybody’s arm to buy near the Amsterdam Houses today.

So, finally: If you could pick the top three neighborhoods to invest in today, which would they be?

I think one of the best — and I’m not just saying this because we have a building going up there — but I think Inwood is one of the very few sleeper neighborhoods still around, and I really like it. I still think, for different reasons, that FiDi is still comparatively undervalued. You’re starting to see the trickle-down effect from the Village and SoHo, as it heads Downtown. With North FiDi, especially; all those buildings on the border of Tribeca.

Like 56 Leonard?

Yes, 56 Leonard, 101 Leonard; they’re on Broadway, or Worth, or Leonard. They’re at the cross-roads of entering the Financial District, and we’re seeing those numbers shoot up. And as we see businesses populating the World Trade Center — plus the Fulton Center and the new malls — basically they’re going through the process of building an infrastructure that never existed Downtown, so that it can compete with other residential neighborhoods. It always catered to the business community, and I think the FiDi has been around for long enough as a residential destination that we’re just now seeing the makings of a true residential area in terms of amenities. So I like it for those reasons; it still has a lot of room to grow.

It would be difficult to pinpoint a neighborhood in Brooklyn, but I love Gowanus; I think it’s like a case-study.

56 Leonard

56 Leonard

Have you been there?

Yes, we’re working on projects there. The thing about Gowanus is that it’s the epicenter of many other neighborhoods. It’s between Carroll Gardens and Park Slope, which are two fabulous neighborhoods.

Isn’t it centered on a toxic canal?

For many years the canal was toxic and polluted, and not very attractive –

So it’s basically like Greenpoint-lite.

Yes, but that’s changing; it’s being cleaned-up and redeveloped. There is a population of young artists and creative types that have been living in that area, and it’s been one of those sleeper neighborhoods for a long time. And as pricing continues to escalate in adjacent established neighborhoods, Gowanus is on the verge of major change.

And why has it remained so undervalued; the pollution?

Well because it had a very old stigma attached to it because of the canal, so people stayed away. But at this point we’re out of land, and it’s there, and it is a very good location — and the pollution is being addressed, and re-mediation has been ongoing for years, though it has not been obvious to people. But it’s really on the way. And Whole Foods is opening a Gowanus location, and I think that says a lot.

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Posted in 1182 Broadway | Clifford Finn | DoBro | Douglas Elliman | Downtown | FiDi | Gowanus | Jersey City | Journal Square | Long Island City | Midtown | New York | Residential | The Centurian

Interview: Piet Boon and Lesley Bamberger on Huys, at 404 Park Avenue South

Huys

YIMBY sat down with Lesley Bamberger — CEO of the Kroonenberg Groep — to discuss the firm’s first development in New York City, at 404 Park Avenue South, aka Huys. Project architect Piet Boon was conferenced in, and the ensuing discussion focused on the intricacies of converting an historic property into something modern, and unique, while still maintaining pre-war bones.

YIMBY in bold.

Let’s start with a brief overview of the project’s history.

[Lesley] We had an office building to start with, and we decided — when the Gansevoort went up next door to us — to convert. Before that there was nothing next to us; no buildings. So we decided to redevelop the building into apartments, and we thought to ourselves — which theme are we going to bring to the project? Because we could have done what everybody does, but we wanted to do something different. So we went with Dutch design. We are Dutch developers, and we wanted to make a difference; that was getting Piet Boon involved with the project, getting Piet Oudolf — who did The High Line — into the project, and getting everybody who is involved in the way of art, and everything, to be Dutch. From the numbers on doorways, to the lamp in the lobby.

Huys

Huys, at 404 Park Avenue South

It’s pronounced ‘House,’ right?

[Lesley] Yes. Stadt Huys is the old Dutch spelling for City Hall. And that’s where Huys came from.

Huys

Living room

What year did you originally buy [404 Park Avenue South]?

[Lesley] We bought this 12 years ago, as an investment. On the ground floor, there will be a bank; we will deliver that space around the first of June. We created 58 apartments in the building, as well as a rooftop, fitness space, a children’s play room, and a media room in the basement.

Huys

Rooftop view of the Empire State Building

And sales are almost complete; I saw the penthouses just came on the market?

[Lesley] 92% sold at the moment. The biggest penthouse has already been taken. That has 3,000 square feet, and went for $10.5 million. So we’re very happy with that; it shows that there is a demand for what we’re delivering, since it’s something new to the market, and things have gone very well. But we are very dedicated to the quality of the building.

Huys

Huys at 404 Park Avenue South — glimpse outside the external elevator

It seems like you kept most of the original building.

[Lesley] Yes, we tried to honor the original, but we did it in a way that made a difference. If you look at the facade, it’s totally different, but you don’t have a feeling that you have a completely different build. And what I like about it is that we did a very big development in Amsterdam called The Bank, and we transformed a monumental old building into a very modern, futuristic structure. We made it totally new, and put modern features in. And that’s what we like to do.

When you came into the project, what were the biggest challenges you had to deal with regarding converting the old building?

[Piet] I think the biggest challenge were the windows; we were so lucky that we were able to cut out the old windows. If you’re looking at an office, the windows are always very high, and we wanted to maintain that feel, but let in more light. And I think it succeeded because when you’re in the building now, you get a better view. Adding the grade to the windows also made a major difference.

Did the context of the neighborhood play into the design; 400 Park Avenue South is decidedly more modern, so did that factor into anything?

[Piet] Well we didn’t know whether 400 Park Avenue South would even rise at the time we began to work on Huys, so that didn’t factor into the design; at least, we were unsure if the Portzamparc scheme would be used. We tried to respect the surroundings, and our chief changes were within; the box windows are the most obvious change to the outside. We added texture to the exterior — our building is very, very beautiful.

Huys

Huys

How would you say you one-up competitors in nearby buildings?

[Lesley] We strive for a particular look and feel — architecturally speaking — so there can be no comparison. Quality-wise, also; we try to really focus on the materials. Piet Boon has a certain style which works perfectly for this building.

What are some unique features you put into the apartments that comparable developments do not have?

[Piet] The layout is very important, and using the daylight; we also made the ceilings as high as possible. I think the door-frames are also very beautiful; they are high and wide. I think all the details — I mean if you’re in the building, you can sense the effort and the work we put in.

Huys

Living room, with Juliet balcony

So this is your first major project in New York?

[Lesley] Yes.

Huys

Looking down on Park Avenue and 28th Street from a Juliet balcony

And do you have any other developments coming up?

[Lesley] We’re looking at a few buildings, but we aren’t there yet. We definitely have thoughts on where and how we want to proceed.

Would your next project be another conversion?

[Lesley] We like to do conversions, because that’s where we can make a difference. Hopefully we can get to it — we still have a building in Miami, in South Beach, and also Chicago. But developing — we would like to do that in New York.

Huys

Rooftop view looking north, up Park Avenue South

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Posted in 404 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Gramercy | Huys | New York | Piet Boon | Residential

Construction Update: Huys, 404 Park Avenue South

404 Park Avenue South

The redevelopment of 404 Park Avenue South — aka ‘Huys‘ — is nearing completion, and the first of the building’s decorative netting has been removed, revealing significant improvements to the underlying structure. Helmed by Piet Boon, the renovation transformed the tower into a set of 58 residences; the developer is Kroonenberg Groep.

Curbed reported that within Huys, the penthouses are asking between $6.75 and $10.5 million, and range in size from 2,400 to over 3,000 square feet. Permits indicate the entirety of the project measures 107,662  square feet, including a 5,130 square foot commercial component on the first floor.

404 Park Avenue South

404 Park Avenue South

While exterior changes have been focused on relatively minor details, the collective shift has given 404 Park Avenue South a whole new look; some windows bulge out of the brick facade, while others are inset within. The contemporary accents help to differentiate Huys from similar pre-war conversions in the neighborhood, and also enhance the contrast with 400 Park Avenue South, which stands directly across 28th Street.

404 Park Avenue South

400 and 404 Park Avenue South

Together, the projects represent the best of both kinds of development, with their architecture quality warranted by the rapidly rising cache of the part-NoMAD and part-Gramercy locale. The southern reaches of Park Avenue South have rapidly developed into a desirable neighborhood, with the rise of NoMAD a primary contributing factor.

Completion of 404 Park Avenue South is expected this year.

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Posted in 404 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Gramercy | Huys | Kroonenberg Groep | Midtown | New York | NoMad | Piet Boon | Residential

What the New York Skyline Gained in 2013

Lower Manhattan - One World Trade Center

2013 was a monumental year for New York City, and as the economy has continued to rebound — and prices have risen — the first non-government-backed effects are now visible across the skyline. Work is wrapping up on the Sandy-delayed One57, which is the city’s first residential skyscraper to pass the 1,000 foot mark. Besides Extell’s first supertall, the cranes for 432 Park Avenue are also poking above the Midtown plateau, upping the ante; for a brief moment in 2014, Vinoly’s vision in concrete and ten-by-ten foot panes will become the tallest residential building in the entire world.

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

Outside of Midtown — where work wrapped up on 500′+ buildings at 1717 Broadway, the Baccarat Tower, and 250 West 55th Street — Lincoln Square saw the addition of Glenwood’s 54-story 160 West 62nd Street, which will begin a marked transformation of a forlorn section of Amsterdam Avenue. Portzamparc’s other major tower, at 400 Park Avenue South, also topped-out, and the world’s tallest Holiday Inn — at 99 Washington Street — is also nearing its opening day.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

The common trait the above projects share is a sense of anonymity, lost in New York’s gargantuan scale. Even the tallest of the bunch — 1717 Broadway, at 750 feet — is nearly invisible, enveloped within the Midtown jungle. Its only identifying trait is night-time blue lighting; to most, it is just another boxy glass tower. Though the taller buildings generally have better designs, even the stunning 400 Park Avenue South is relatively ‘lost’ outside of a narrow view corridor; the fact that Manhattan can absorb so many new buildings with barely any visual impact is a testament to the island’s existing density, while also begging the question: Why not build taller, if everything is huge anyways?

A vast range of mid-rises were also completed in 2013, defining the bulk of new construction in Midtown and Lower Manhattan. In addition to 99 Washington, Kaufman’s repertoire included 237 West 54th Street, 312 West 37th Street, and 125 West 28th Street — all to be occupied by mid-range chains like Marriott and Hilton. Besides One World Trade Center’s spire, the Lower Manhattan skyline remained relatively constant, outside of its depths — its height concealed new concepts like 6 Platt Street, a hotel that masquerades as a prison.

6 Platt Street

6 Platt Street

On the far West Side, the AVA High Line and Related’s 500 West 30th Street are nearly complete. Both projects are relatively prominent on the sparsely-populated West Chelsea skyline, and will add to the neighborhood’s street-level pedestrian vibrancy. Exterior work is also wrapping up at the Whitney Museum’s Meatpacking expansion, designed by Renzo Piano.

The Whitney Expansion

The Whitney Expansion

Outside of Manhattan, the outer borough boom is just kicking into gear. 388 Bridge Street topped-out early in the year, becoming Brooklyn’s tallest building — a title it will soon lose to the neighboring Avalon Willoughby. Long Island City’s waterfront also saw major progress; TF Cornerstone’s ‘East Coast’ development is wrapping up, and the first two Hunter’s Point South towers are underway. Both DoBro and the western edge of LIC are finally developing into cohesive and vibrant neighborhoods.

Hunter's Point South

Hunter’s Point South

While 2013′s changes on the New York skyline were great, the impact of new construction in 2014 will be even larger — and detailed in a post tomorrow.

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Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | Hotel | Midtown | New York | Office | Residential | Supertall

Construction Update: 400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South has topped-out; the tower, which is being developed by Toll Brothers City Living, is now at its 42-story pinnacle.

Designed by Christian de Portzamparc, the building is a stellar example of contemporary architecture, and integrates well into its pre-war surroundings; despite the dramatic contrast in design, 400 Park Avenue South maintains a hefty street-wall presence, while simultaneously soaring into the sky.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

The varied ‘layers’ of the tower echo the ‘wedding-cake’ skyscrapers of pre-war Manhattan, though the intricacies of 400 Park Avenue South’s glass curtain wall – and its significantly more modern profile – provide obvious distinction. The vertical profile of Portzamparc’s creation offers a lesson in elegance that other architects would be wise to follow.

400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South – view from the Empire State Building

While the superstructure has reached the roof, cladding is still rising – and it has a long ways to go before wrapping around the entire structure. Already, the varied angles of the tower’s glass shatter any complete reflections, resulting in a funhouse-style appearance of the crystalline skyscraper.

Completion of 400 Park Avenue South is expected in 2014.

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Posted in 400 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Portzamparc | Residential | Starchitecture

Construction Update: 160 East 22nd Street

160 East 22nd Street

Toll Brothers City Living’s new building at 160 East 22nd Street is nearing exterior completion; since the last update on the project, it has topped-out, and most of the facade has now been installed. The building stands 21 floors and holds a total of 81 units, and the architect is Perkins Eastman.

160 East 22nd Street is at the forefront of the cantilever craze that is now sweeping Manhattan; the southern portion of the tower sits above two adjacent townhomes, and marks one of the most impressive overhangs in New York City to date, at 25 feet.

Besides the application of forward-thinking structural design, 160 East 22nd Street is fairly subdued in its facade, and melds modern and traditional elements into a visually coherent final product. Combining irregularly patterned windows with classic Indiana limestone works in the building’s favor, and harkens to the BKSK-designed 25 Bond Street, which is visually similar – though far shorter.

Completion of 160 East 22nd is expected in 2014.

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Posted in 160 East 22nd Street | Gramercy | Perkins Eastman | Toll Brothers

Construction Update: 400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

Toll Brothers City Living‘s 400 Park Avenue South is approaching topping-out, and now stands 37 floors tall. Construction has accelerated as the tower has grown, likely a byproduct of simpler layouts on higher floors; as the superstructure rises, the jagged peripheral shards of the ‘Fortress of Glassitude‘ shrink away from the main body, leaving the center mass to form the eventual pinnacle on its own.

The facade has also made progress, though the visual change is not as notable. The variety of angles that form 400 Park Avenue South appear to be cutting-edge in a literal sense, and the reflectivity of the glass will result in a sharp final product; even with much of the eastern cladding obscured, the exterior is a pleasant testament to legitimately luxury new construction.

Since the end of the recession, the surrounding neighborhood has boomed in popularity, morphing alongside New York’s rapidly rising technology sector; this has  spurred many new and extremely high-end development in a small radius surrounding Madison Square Park. One Madison, 10 Madison Square West, and Huys will also be completed soon, and all besides 400 Park Avenue South – which will have the most units by a wide margin – will be entirely condominium.

Designed by Portzamparc, 400 Park Avenue South will eventually rise 42 floors and 476 feet. The base will be occupied by retail, while the bulk of the tower will hold 363 residences, mixing condominiums on upper levels with rental units below. Construction should be finished by this time next year.

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Posted in 400 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Gramercy | Midtown | New York | Portzamparc | Residential | Toll Brothers

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