It’s Time to Give West 14th Street the Rezoning It Deserves

The Apple Store

The Commissioners’ Plan of 1811, which laid out Manhattan’s iconic grid that sprawls beyond its chaotic downtown, designated 15 crosstown streets as major 100-foot-wide thoroughfares. The various major crosstown streets got subway stations and those below Central Park have developed distinct identities – home furnishing stores and chic apartments on 23rd, clothes shopping and tourism on 34th, office buildings on 42nd, ultra-luxury condos and world-class shopping on 57th.

By all rights, 14th Street should be just as grand. It sits above the L train, the city’s main vein of gentrification. Its adjacent neighborhoods have exploded in popularity, benefiting mightily from downtown’s ascendence.

Intersection of 14th Street and 9th Avenue

Intersection of 14th Street and 9th Avenue

But the crucial crosstown corridor, and especially its western half, has not fared well. The days of cheap apartments are long gone, but the cheap-looking tenements that once housed them remain, without any real character to speak of. Despite the exploding demand in the last decade or two, there’s been virtually no new construction.

Fourteenth Street had its first moment in the sun around one hundred years ago, as the city’s center was making its way uptown. Elevated trains, subways and a space crunch downtown were pulling Manhattan northwards, and tall commercial buildings popped up on Union Square and 14th Street around the turn of the century. But the center soon rocketed even farther uptown, first to 23rd Street and later up to 42nd and beyond, quickly leaving 14th Street behind.

The next building boom came in the 1950s and ’60s. Greenwich Village became very popular (drawing in, among others, Jane Jacobs) – along with the Upper East Side, one of the last places in Manhattan where new construction was still viable as the city was circling the drain – and builders met the new demand with massive, modernist brick buildings. The Victoria at 7 West 14th Street, by prolific white brick architect Philip Birnbaum, was the largest of these, providing more spartan and affordable accommodations than the grand pre-war apartment houses, but at a density more commonly found on the avenues of the Upper East Side.

It’s hard to say whether this sort of construction would have continued throughout the rest of the ’60s and into the ’70s, as the city’s desirability plummeted. But in any case, the zoning code did not allow it. Builders rushed to file permits before the new 1961 code took effect, after which the dense apartment blocks were no longer allowed.

But by the ’80s, demand for living on 14th Street had certainly reemerged (if it ever left). Development, though, was still not allowed. The Zeckendorf Towers on Union Square East were built in the late ’80s, but only after a politically fraught rezoning that was not to be repeated. Other than that, only one developer managed to assemble enough air rights out of the mid-rise tenements of West 14th Street to build a large scale project – Basile Builders and their Chelsea Verde at 125 West 14th Street, finished in 2001 between Sixth and Seventh Avenues.

Today, demand for new office space in the Meatpacking District is off the charts. The Meatpacking District, once the butt-end of 14th Street, has become a high-rent tech anchor. Google paid $1.9 billion for the old Port Authority building at 111 Eighth Avenue, and new office space in the area rents for well over $100 a square foot – prices more commonly associated with Central Park views uptown. The western end of the street has established itself as one of a select few submarkets in the city where new office construction pencils out without tax breaks. And the L train’s capacity west of Union Square is essentially unlimited, after the hordes from Brooklyn headed to destinations east of Broadway change for the 4/5/6 and N/Q/R.

Residential demand is similarly high. Condos at DDG Partners’s 345 Meatpacking have sold for upwards of $1,500 per square foot, with penthouses surpassing the $3,000/SF mark, and there’s likely much more room for upward growth in rents and condo prices.

To capitalize on this demand, the city should upzone West 14th Street and the broader Meatpacking District. Any rezoning would have to be carefully tailored to local conditions, as the area is ground zero for West Side NIMBYism, but compromises should be possible.

Old tenements

Old tenements on the north side of 14th Street

The lowest-hanging fruit is the north side of West 14th Street between Seventh and Eighth Avenues. This strip is a solid block of some of the least attractive pre-war tenements in the city – largely denuded of their cornices and other frills, and nowhere near monumental or charming enough for such a key corridor. The whole block face could be upzoned to the highest densities possible (floor area ratios of up to 12 for apartment buildings, and 15 for offices), after which developers would gradually wait or buy out the tenements’ remaining residents and redevelop them.

What few affordable apartments are left in this part of town wouldn’t last long anyway, as landlords can easily use vacancy decontrol rules to raise rents to market rates after the current tenants leave, so there would be no major loss of affordable housing. With mandatory inclusionary zoning, the number could even increase. Or better yet, the city could have developers pay into a fund that it would use to build an even larger number of below-market units in cheaper neighborhoods uptown and in the outer boroughs.

837 Washington Street

837 Washington Street

The Meatpacking District would be a bit trickier, since it has more attractive buildings and is a landmark district, but growth is possible there too. The area is ripe for a façadist building boom, whereby developers submit plans to build modern structures within and on top of the old low-slung warehouses. Their horizontality and large footprints, combined with attractive but not historic architecture, make them ideal candidates for redevelopment along the lines of Morris Adjmi’s 837 Washington in the Meatpacking District, or the Hearst Tower on West 57th Street.

But unlike 837 Washington, future façadist towers should be allowed to rise to much higher densities – two or three times the floor area ratio of five of the torqued Washington Street tower. Indeed, there’s plenty of pre-war precedent for these densities in this part of town. The gargantuan Port Authority terminal has an FAR of 13, while the circa-1930 tower on the northeastern corner of 14th Street and Eighth Avenue has an FAR of nearly twenty. If New York City is to rein in its spiraling rents, it cannot limit developers to densities that are a fraction of what was being built nearly a century ago.

Tower on the corner of 14th Street and Eighth Avenue

Tower on the corner of 14th Street and Eighth Avenue

The Landmarks Preservation Commission should also be told to ease up on height-related concerns, to avoid the time- and money-consuming back-and-forth that ensued between the developer and the LPC that resulted in a slightly bulkier building but little else.

The city of Toronto offers a compelling model here. All development is discretionary in Canada’s largest city, and in exchange for the right to build tall towers, the city often asks developers to preserve pre-war structures and integrate them into the bases of new buildings.

The desirability of West 14th Street and the Meatpacking District has soared, and now it’s time for the demand to be matched by new supply. With the area’s high design sensibilities, iconic architecture is virtually guaranteed, so long as the city allows it.

Just as 14th Street bloomed with new office buildings 100 years ago and new apartments 50 years ago, today’s demand should also translate into new construction. This corner of the city has already become popular with tourists during the day and bridge-and-tunnel clubgoers at night, and now it’s time to cater to New Yorkers who both live and work in the neighborhood.

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Posted in 14th Street Rezoning | 345 Meatpacking | 837 Washington Street | Architecture | Downtown | Greenwich Village | meatpacking | Midtown South | New York | Residential

Revealed: Plaza Renovation at 1250 Broadway

Most New Yorkers may recognize the office tower at 1250 Broadway as the entrance to Koreatown, but owner Jamestown is well on its way to repositioning the black-and-white modernist skyscraper as a tech hub. To that end, the landlord is embarking on a $3 million renovation of the building’s plaza and lobby, and shared renderings of the project with YIMBY.

The makeover involves a new glass curtain wall at the tower’s base and a new stainless steel canopy, as well as replacing “the existing stone metal cladding at the corner of the building with new ‘white glass’ primary façade material,” per a press release.

Jamestown bought 1250 Broadway in 2008, and while it doesn’t have the stereotypically pre-war aesthetic of other tech-y buildings — like Chelsea Market, soon to undergo a major expansion — it has still attracted a fair number of firms, showing that a prime location on Silicon Alley and a dearth of older buildings with affordable rents will lead to companies stepping outside of their comfort zone.

Varonis Systems just tripled their space for a total of 46,000 square feet over three floors, while Rocket Fuel and Piksel, among others, also count themselves as tenants.

The renovation of 1250 Broadway should wrap up in the fall. The new design is by Moed de Armas & Shannon Architects, who are also heading up the redesign of nearby Herald Center at 1293 Broadway.

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Posted in 1250 Broadway | Architecture | Construction Update | Jamestown | Koreatown | Midtown | Midtown South | New York | Office

Construction Update: 855 Sixth Avenue

855 Sixth Avenue

Full renderings may be lacking, but construction at 855 Sixth Avenue has begun in earnest, where the Durst Organization is erecting a 41-story mixed-use tower (with the help of some foreign EB-5 investors looking for a slice of the American dream), as YIMBY previously reported.

The tower will be predominately residential, with 375 luxury apartments (20 percent of which will be rented at below-market rates), but will also include a sizable office component and 57,000 square feet of retail space.

855 Sixth Avenue

855 Sixth Avenue

Because the large development site bleeds into the industrial M1-6 zone between Sixth and Seventh Avenues, the developer cannot build the entire site to its highest and best use – luxury residential – and will therefore be including a substantial 127,000 square feet of office space on the second through sixth floors (to put that in perspective, that’s not that much smaller than the Jeanne Gang-designed all-office “Solar Carve” tower going up on the High Line).

While the office space won’t be as profitable as luxury apartments – and office space hasn’t been more profitable than residential space anywhere in the five boroughs for longer than we’ve been around – Durst will likely have no problem finding tenants. Unlike the towers going up at the World Trade Center and on the Far West Side, 855 Sixth sits squarely within the Midtown South subdistrict, where tech and creative companies are eager to lease space.

855 Sixth Avenue

855 Sixth Avenue

The tower should add some heft to an area that’s been crying out for height to accompany the once-lonely Empire State Building. And the partial renderings that have been released show a clean façade designed by Cook + Fox (SLCE is the architect of record), mercifully bereft of the PTAC heating and cooling units that normally pockmark rental buildings in New York City, but which are unheard of in office towers.

855 Sixth Avenue

855 Sixth Avenue

Per on-site signage, completion of 855 Sixth Avenue is expected in April of 2016.

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Posted in 855 6th Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Cook + Fox Architects | Durst | Midtown | New York | Office | Residential | SLCE

Construction Update: 160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue

New permits have been filed for 160 Madison Avenue, which is already under construction; the documents reveal a minor height increase for the project, which has been upped from 379 to 452 feet. The architect of record is SLCE, and the developer is JD Carlisle. An insider tipped YIMBY that the development’s planned insides have also changed, and it will have rentals rather than condominiums.

160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue

The alterations to the tower’s plans are relatively minor, and the height increase means the building will eventually stand 41 stories tall — or 42, including the rooftop bulkhead. Construction has proceeded very rapidly over the past several months, and as of November’s update, the crane had only just been installed. Now, 160 Madison stands approximately one-third of its final height.

160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue

Unfortunately, the project’s impact on the neighborhood street-scape is already apparent; the podium offends the urban sensibilities of Madison Avenue, which has one of the best street-walls in Manhattan. The tower withdraws from the base after the first floor, and while the ‘tower-in-a-park’ motif would be acceptable in a far-flung location, it is extremely out of character for Midtown.

160 Madison Avenue will have a total of 319 units, and completion is expected in 2015.

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Posted in 160 Madison Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | JD Carlisle | Midtown | Midtown South | New York | Residential | SLCE

Interview with the Architect: Rafael Pelli

Rafael Pelli - courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

YIMBY sat down with Rafael Pelli — of Pelli Clarke Pelli — to discuss the firm’s latest work in New York City, the architect’s background, as well as technological progress and its relation to the future of new construction.

Besides diving into the process behind 475 Park Avenue South’s renovation, the currently-stalled 15 Penn Plaza was also discussed, as well as innovations driving supertall buildings, which Pelli Clarke Pelli has significant experience with.

YIMBY in bold.

So I imagine your interest in architecture developed because of your father [Cesar Pelli]?

Actually, I resisted it because of my father — growing up in the 60s and early 70s, you didn’t do what your parents did. I always resisted, although I love to draw; when I got out of college, I realized I didn’t want to be a historian, and I never wanted to write another paper in my life. So I just wanted to find something that allowed me to draw, and I tried a bunch of things. I worked for graphic designers, a photographer, and then between jobs I helped out my dad for a while, thinking ‘well I’ll just do this to make a few dollars,’ and — you know — probably not that coincidentally, though shocking to me, I loved it and it was really fun. So I spent three years after college sorting it all out, and then I went to graduate school.

So does your background in history factor into your designs at all?

I have no idea; somebody could say it does, but in the end, I think any artistic impulse from anybody comes from some sense of who they are, their various interests, and the way they look at the world, but I couldn’t tell you how it comes into play.

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South – courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

I really like the facade on 475 Park Avenue South; it’s a fun new take on glass, and shows just how versatile glass is becoming. How did you go about designing it, and what gave you inspiration for its unique attributes?

Well, at its core, it was a pretty simple job to replace the existing facade, which had brick piers and inset windows. But, the material of glass has an incredible range of possibilities, both technical and aesthetic. I think that we’re still kind of exploring it, and there’s a lot of possibility still inherent in the aesthetic potential of glass.

So [at 475 PAS] we tried to do a more contemporary sort of update on the traditional wall with simple rectangular windows, but instead of brick piers or glass piers, we played with the frit pattern — which is this kind of baked-on pattern –

Wait, what is this called again?

It’s called a frit pattern, because it’s actually not paint; it’s a ceramic material baked-on under super-high temperatures. It’s on the back of the glass, and we had to get a super-clear white glass so you would read it as black and white, because most traditional glass has more iron in it, and it kind of adds this greenish tint. And a lot of the buildings you see, they have this coloring; some of it is from the iron, and some is from the coatings that minimize the heat-load. So we had to work to get this super-white glass, and to get this pattern behind it, where we could create a sense of undulation.

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South – courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

It looks metallic, almost like Gehry’s 8 Spruce Street.

It resembles a kind of screen, or drapery — a metallic kind of billowing surface. All within a very flat plane — the reality is it needed to be flat – but I think it was remarkably successful and very handsome. And it’s subtle, it’s something that doesn’t — you have to stop and look at it.

Definitely – you don’t realize it’s glass, and when you walk past, it looks like metal. I had to stare and wonder – what is this? It’s confusing but in a good way, as it adds a layer of depth to a glass facade that you typically don’t see.

Exactly. It adds depth; and I think that’s something that really interests me. This needed to be pretty straightforward as a re-cladding, but it’s a very sophisticated wall. We tried to get the depth in another way — and it was a really fun design exercise, and it was beautifully done by the curtain wall fabricators, a company called Permasteelisa. They did a really good job; they’re one of the best. So it was about getting depth, and a bit of a structural quality — a fullness to it — in a building that will otherwise be very beautiful, crisp, clean, and simple for most people. But when people stop, and look up, and see it; then it will be more interesting. And I think that’s true for a lot of very beautiful things; for paintings, clothing. A lot of things seem simple on the surface and then as you look at them, you think – that’s a beautiful weave in that fabric, or that’s beautiful brushwork on that painting. But it’s kind of a subtle effect.

But that’s so much better, because glaringly obvious things are often ugly.

Well, sometimes those things can get — you know, you take them for granted after a while. The subtle things can be a surprise; you don’t necessarily see them every day, or wear them every day. You only see them when you’re really looking for them. And that can have a really nice kind of quality to it, which is different from doing the really obvious gestures. But we are really pleased with the way it’s coming out, and can’t wait to see it all done. And then the lobby is being renovated, and the plaza is being re-done; all these things will add to the feeling of this being a very new and contemporary building, although it’s actually an older building.

This is an issue technically – I mean that Bloomberg talks about, and the real estate industry talks about – as we have many hundreds of buildings which are from the 60′s and 70′s which are in need of substantial updating and maintenance, and facade replacement in many cases, and it’s beyond just solving the practical problems. It’s, “how do we make architecture out of it,” –

How do we make it nice.

Exactly. It’s an interesting aesthetic though. We do mostly ground-up new construction. It’s an interesting kind of architectural challenge and I think a lot of architects are going to be dealing with this, because there are so many older buildings, and a lot of them just aren’t being replaced. But then how do you make something beautiful out of it? How do you make something that adds to the richness and variety of the city? Older buildings — their brickwork sometimes, beautiful brickwork – this is doing it in a different way, but I think it still has some of that richness.

And [475 Park Avenue South] was brick before, correct?

It was — brick piers.

And was the facade falling apart? What was happening?

The facade had a lot of leaking in it, so it needed a replacement; it was a practical problem, and it led to a much more extensive and complete re-do than the owner had initially imagined, but he was very enthusiastic and incredibly supportive of this. And he really likes the aesthetic qualities of [the re-design], so he was very much a partner in this. And because we had these old-fashioned chamfered corners, which looked very dated, we were able to make the edge of this new sort of skin extend over it. So you have this thin edge.

Like the New York Times Building?

Right, a little bit like the New York Times. Which is a nice detail — again, something you don’t pay attention to until you get close, but then you see the thin edge of the wall sliding past the building itself, which is a nice quality.

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South – courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Is renovating more difficult than ground-up construction? This one has been in the works for a while.

I think it’s been six years. Big buildings often take a long time. Existing buildings are often more complicated than new construction because as you start to renovate, you encounter things you didn’t know were there; you know, when you’re building it all new, you can adjust things to each other. But here, it’s having to adapt all these new pieces to the old building. So there’s a lot of care and due diligence and making sure everything is right. There was a lot of time and care taken to get it right.

Were there any major unforeseen issues you encountered when you started the renovation process?

There are always unforeseen issues when dealing with existing buildings, and this was no exception. It’s just a question of finding them — doing a lot of careful work. Like the old expression for tailors — ‘measure twice, cut once.’ For renovations it’s kind of like ‘survey five times before you build,’ because you want to make sure you know every single detail and every condition as well as possible. And then when you start disassembling the walls to put on new pieces, you still encounter new conditions. It’s more complicated dealing with existing construction, to marry up new pieces to existing construction; it’s still doable, it just has to be methodical and carefully done

Many people dislike office buildings built in the same time period as 475 Park Avenue South [the 60's-70's] – what are some qualities unique and good about these post-war structures, and is anything worthy of preservation? 

Well, the old buildings — particularly the pre-war buildings — have a level of craftsmanship in their construction that can be very charming, which is very hard to replicate with modern technology, or with a modern labor force. So I think the period of buildings that suffered the most are those from the 60′s and 70′s, when the technology wasn’t ready to replace [the craftsmanship]; buildings were being built to a newer aesthetic, without the same level of refinement. Often times the technological developments went hand-in-hand with the performance issues; the way we dealt with the energy crisis of the early 70′s was by tinting all the windows, and so you have a lot of buildings from that period with tinted windows, which are very dark. And they make these buildings very tough, and very foreboding from the outside. Now, they’ve found ways they can reduce the heat-load to the glass, while still having [panes] be very transparent; you let a lot more natural light into the building, they seem a lot less monolithic and insular from the outside, and that changes their image and expression. But the old buildings sometimes have a lot of charm – the nicer ones, the ones that were done carefully. Certainly there were some wonderful buildings built on upper Park Avenue, where there was more care and money put into them. The Seagram Building, Lever House, the old Olivetti Building; those are still some of my favorite buildings in New York. They have a sense of crispness. But there’s an equal level of detail in those buildings as some of the older pre-wars, simply in a more modern way.

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South – courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Because they’re in this expensive area.

Right, and it’s justified. Where that aesthetic didn’t do so well was when it was used for lesser buildings; then they just were very plain, tough-looking, and fortress-like.

Did context figure into designing 475 Park Avenue South? I know the neighborhood is a relative mish-mosh of styles, so did you take the surrounding buildings into account?

We did, in that even though it’s an all-glass building, we didn’t express it as a uniformly glass building – or as one object that looks completely unlike other buildings. In a way, we picked up some of the texture of the street in the scale of the windows; there are all these older, masonry buildings. So even though it’s a glass building, we contrasted the view window from the portions of the glass which cover up the structure and floor-slabs, so that it still has this kind of feel and texture and scale of the older buildings. But it’s still very contemporary. I thought it worked, and it’s nice to play off that scale. In that sense, it clearly looked to context and played off the things that were there.

15 Penn Plaza

15 Penn Plaza – courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

15 Penn Plaza is another huge project you’ve done in New York City; what were your thoughts behind that building, the evolution of the design… and when will it be built? Do you think it will be built in its current form?

I can’t say. I never try to predict the future; large building projects in the city always go through a lot of evolution, and they change over time, and even the same architect ten years later will look at it with a different eye, and see different possibilities. 15 Penn was a concept design which we did for the zoning approval.

So it wasn’t even a real proposal?

Well, it’s not a complete design; there’s a lot remaining to fully design that building. The final one that was approved was set close to Seventh Avenue, and it was a very developed concept from an urban standpoint, in terms of city planning. They wanted to know how the height and mass would interact with the city, what the set-backs would be like, and how it would affect the site. Really, how it affects the city from the outside — but as a worked-out building on the inside, there’s a lot to be determined, and that’s going to depend on the tenant. If this ends up being for a financial institution, it’ll be one kind of building; if it’s for a big software company, it’ll be another kind of building. And it’s going to evolve; it will be refined further depending on tenancy, and it’s hard to determine when the market will necessitate it being built.

The 2020′s!

Could be! Buildings get built, but they take time, and then they respond to the conditions of that time. I’m sure it’ll evolve in ways I can’t fully anticipate right now, but what we have today is just an elegant concept. I think it would be a beautiful skyline presence as a tapered form, but in a more contemporary way. But there’s still a lot of work to do.

This is so fun because I normally ask people ‘what would you do with a supertall,’ and you have actually designed and built supertall buildings, which is very cool. We have these innovations with concrete — I mean you see One World Trade Center, which is like a fortress, and now you have 432 Park Avenue, which is basically an enormous core — and they allow for these new extruded and extreme forms. Do you see yourself incorporating these technological innovations into future designs?

We’re always looking at innovations, and they’ve allowed us to build buildings more resistant to earthquakes, more resistant to wind-loads. More secure. Sometimes those are things that aren’t visible; you don’t necessarily see them. A lot of things happen inside buildings that aren’t visible on the outside, though sometimes they are clearly expressed. We definitely look at new technologies and what they allow us to do; it’s not just that you can go taller, you can also go slender. Part of that is simply the advances in software which allow you to more robustly understand and fully analyze the structural issues at a very high height, because the mathematics largely existed, but they were immensely complex. There’s always a level of carefulness – you can’t afford to make a mistake. So I think analytical tools are as important for the new generation of structures as the actual building technology developments themselves.

So you definitely appreciate the slim aesthetic of the 57th Street towers, like 432 Park and SHoP’s 111 West 57th, which will be the skinniest in the world. Do you see yourself potentially doing a supertall and super-skinny building?

Oh sure. That would be — we’d like to try something that we’ve never done before. So it’s nice to vary those kinds of scales and proportions. We’ve done so many supertall buildings, but I love designing tiny things, too — there’s a joy in designing that comes with scale. But it would be interesting to design a tall, slim tower.

I wonder from a city perspective, how many super-slim towers can cluster together before they really start changing the sense of the city. I mean, the city has always had that characteristic — and I’m not one that would ever call for height limits — I just wonder about the density of tall towers, and how they will transform the city from an urban standpoint. I mean it’s got to be an interesting phenomena; some of the skyline buildings are now going to be residential, which is very different from what we’re used to.

Last question: Where do you see the future of architecture in New York heading? Is it a direction you like, and what would you like to see more of?

Architecture is being transformed by the inherent potential of digital technology in ways that are both obvious, and in many ways, more subtle. Some of the building we’re doing here at 475 Park Avenue South is not obvious, but those kinds of patterns, and the ability to study all those patterns; it becomes a lot easier through all the digital imaging technology. The printing techniques on glass are easier through this technology. I think, clearly, the kinds of formal expression you see in Frank Gehry buildings, and other architects who are playing with much more expressive forms — this is helped enormously by digital technology, which is able to design it, document it, and then build and fabricate it. And it’s firms like SHoP that have really taken that to an incredible level — a degree of really using that technology to build a building. And the idea in big buildings historically was to try to have as much replication as possible; so you come up with a single unit size of glass for the tower, or two sizes of glass for the tower, and you repeat them five hundred times — so when fabricating a building, you’re not designing twenty-thousand different pieces of glass.

But now, you can have twenty-thousand different sized pieces of glass; through digital fabrication techniques you have the potential to build buildings that are much more customized to each individual component than was ever possible before. So it allows for different forms, it allows for different expressions, it allows us to study a range of different possibilities. It’s clearly changing the profession in ways big and small.

Posted in Architecture | Midtown | New York | Office | Pelli Clarke Pelli | Rafael Pelli | Supertall

Renovation Update: 475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South

After years of delay, the first of 475 Park Avenue South’s new facade has been revealed – and it is well worth the extremely long wait.

Designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli, the new facade looks like metal from afar, almost echoing the cladding on Gehry’s 8 Spruce Street. The renovation’s genius comes through when the building is viewed from up close; the exterior is, in fact, entirely glass.

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South

475 Park Avenue South flips the traditional glass building on its head, representing another advance for contemporary architecture in Manhattan. The re-clad shows just how versatile glass can be, and that ‘glass boxes’ need not be so; technology is at the point where glass can mimic other materials, and this is where 475 Park Avenue South excels.

In designing the facade, Pelli Clarke Pelli has created a modern interpretation of the trompe l’oeil; obviously 475 Park Avenue South is not painted, but the glass results in a similarly skewed effect, adding a layer of dynamism that few projects possess.

The building’s owner is Charles Cohen, and 475 Park Avenue South – which has 400,000 square feet of space – was built in 1969.

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Posted in 475 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Office

Construction Update: 160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue

The crane is now up at 160 Madison Avenue, which will soon give rise to a 31-story tower; the architect of record is SLCE. The site’s developer is JD Carlisle, and the building has undergone a number of changes since Ismael Leyva designed the initial iteration.

160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue

Excavation at the site is now complete, and foundations are being poured; the forms in the lower levels already show the shape of the eventual tower, which will rise at a diagonal to the street. The lone rendering, which was posted on-site, doesn’t show the tower in any level of real detail, but the interruption of the street-wall along Madison Avenue is a definite negative.

160 Madison Avenue

160 Madison Avenue and the Empire State Building

Once finished, 160 Madison will hold 225 condominiums and stand 371 feet tall; while the exterior may be lackluster, at least units will have relatively high ceilings. Besides the residential, there will be an 11,000 square foot retail component. Completion of the project is expected in 2015.

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Posted in 160 Madison Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | Midtown South | New York | Residential | SLCE

Construction Update: 309 Fifth Avenue

309 Fifth Avenue

Work is wrapping up on The Dylan, which is a new 35-story residential building at 309 Fifth Avenue. The design went through several revisions before Urban Development Partners ultimately decided on the final version, which turned out to be a simple, angular glass box by SLCE. The only major problem is the treatment of the Fifth Avenue street wall, which is significantly recessed – 309 Fifth leaves a notable absence in a stretch that remains dominated by pre-war architecture that conforms to typical Manhattan urbanity.

Besides the problems with the street wall, the glass facade is standard, lacking the personality to be either good or bad – the design is typical for the Midtown South location, and 309 Fifth Avenue is surrounded by blocks sprouting similarly benign towers. At the very least, residential buildings like 309 Fifth are several grades better than the hotels of Kaufman and Poon – though all of the aforementioned are changing the face of the neighborhood at a rapid pace.

The Dylan has a total of 165 units, and the official website has all the details on the property, where studios start at just over $3,000.

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Posted in 309 Fifth Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 304 Fifth Avenue

304 Fifth Avenue

Across the street from the almost-complete 309 Fifth Avenue – aka The Dylan – is yet another new building at 304 Fifth Avenue. According to filings with the Department of Buildings, the developer is The Development Corp of NYP, which has a fairly non-informational website that seems to list port properties rather than anything that would be in Manhattan.

Despite an apparent lack of information, architect Sung Ho Shin’s website has a rendering of a 15-story tower that seems to have been an old proposal for the site – the tight boundaries limit creativity given the project’s unworthy location for starchitecture. Still, the latest permits at the DOB indicate a downward adjustment in 304 Fifth Avenue’s height, which has been reduced to 13 stories and 163 feet. Bricolage is apparently the architect, but their site also lacks any designs.

Going on the information that is available, the original design looked straight out of the 1980s, and it seems unlikely that the new plan will deviate in a major way – though 304 Fifth Avenue’s planned use has also changed since the original plans, shifting from residential to commercial.

Construction is well underway, and the first floor is currently being fabricated – no formal completion date has been announced, but given the scope, 2014 would be a reasonable assumption.

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Posted in 304 Fifth Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Office

Construction Update: 400 Park Avenue South

400 Park Avenue South

Work on Toll Brothers’ 400 Park Avenue South has accelerated in recent weeks, and the tower has risen five floors since the last update, from late June. 400 Park Avenue South now stands 14 stories tall, a fraction of its future 42-story height, but tall enough to begin impacting the cityscape. Gramercy has few buildings that exceed twenty floors, so 400 Park Avenue South will achieve prominence shortly.

Besides progress on the building’s superstructure, cladding is now arriving on-site, and facade installation should begin shortly. Designed by Christian de Portzamparc, 400 Park Avenue South’s glass is sure to be stunning, cementing the ‘fortress of glassitude’ as a Gramercy icon.

Completion of 400 Park Avenue South is anticipated for 2015, when all 365 units will be ready for occupancy.

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Posted in 400 Park Avenue South | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Portzamparc | Residential | Starchitecture

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