Permits Filed: 30 Hudson Yards

Rendering of 30 Hudson Yards, as seen from the 7 station, via Related

The official groundbreaking for 30 Hudson Yards, Related’s North Tower, happened at the end of 2012, when construction began on the $700 million platform over which part of the tower will rest. And soon, work on the actual tower may commence, with architect KPF filing permits this morning under the structure’s official name, 500 West 33rd Street.

Financing arrangements for the tower are in the works, and the construction loan will close in mid-2015, at which point the tower will begin to go vertical.

Time Warner, which will own their own space will be the anchor tenant at the tower at 10th Avenue and 33rd Street, occupying space up to the 38th floor, with the choicest perches still up for grabs.

30 Hudson Yards, as viewed from 33rd Street and 10th Avenue, via Related

30 Hudson Yards, as viewed from 33rd Street and 10th Avenue, via Related

In related news, the first part of the “Hudson Boulevard” park and mid-avenue thoroughfare, between 10th and 11th Avenues, should open by the end of the year, according to the Wall Street Journal. The initial segment will stretch from West 33rd Street to West 39th, and will contain a pedestrian promenade in the center and north- and southbound streets on the edges.

The tower at 30 Hudson Yards will contain around 2.6 million square feet of office space, plus another million in retail in an adjacent podium.

The companion tower of 30 Hudson Yards, known as the South (or Coach) Tower at 10 Hudson Yards, started to go vertical last year. Its tenants – which include Coach, L’Oréal and SAP – are expected to move in by July 2015.

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Posted in 30 Hudson Yards | Architecture | Hudson Yards | Kohn Pedersen Fox | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Office | Related

Revealed: 60 West 37th Street

60 West 37th Street, pre-demo at left, rendering by Peter Poon at right

The first renderings are online for another Peter Poon-designed hotel, this one coming to 60 West 37th Street. Hidrock Realty is the site’s developer, and demolition of existing parking garages is now complete. A tipster pointed out Gace Engineering’s page on the project, which also reveals that Embassy Suites will be the occupant.

As YIMBY reported in March, permits indicate the tower will span 195,360 square feet, split between 313 rooms; the building will stand 42 stories tall, making it one of the larger budget-minded hotels to come to Midtown Manhattan in recent years. Gace’s site gives slightly different figures of 165,000 square feet and 41 floors, but the difference is trivial, and the DOB filings are likely accurate.

60 West 37th Street

60 West 37th Street, renderings by Peter Poon

Design-wise, the renderings don’t look infuriating, but given the frequent discordance between depictions and reality – especially when it comes to budget hotels — anyone holding their breath is likely in for disappointment. The tower spans from 36th Street through to 37th, giving Poon the perfect opportunity to wreck two street-walls instead of just one.

Beyond the tower’s unfortunate form, its use along 36th Street will detract further, as the site’s rear-end will hold a two-story parking garage. Both sides of the new Embassy Suites will deaden the surrounding street, and 60 West 37th Street is another instance of new development blighting an established neighborhood due to outdated zoning, which prohibits land being put to its highest and best use.

A completion date for 60 West 37th Street has not been announced, but with demolition of existing structures finished, verticality appears imminent.

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Posted in 59 West 36th Street | 60 West 37th Street | Architecture | Embassy Suites | Hidrock Realty | Hotel | Midtown | New York | Peter Poon | Renderings | Uncategorized

Changing NYC Workforce Means Changing Office Needs

Related's Hudson Yards towers, image by Related/Oxford and Visualhouse

A slew of super-sized office buildings are set to rise in Manhattan over the next several years, punctuating the city’s skyline with new spires of glass. Towers with over 10 million square feet of class A space – at the World Trade Center, Hudson Yards and Midtown proper – are either under construction or looking for tenants and financing.

With tenants lined up at for the first two office buildings at Hudson Yards and nearly half of the space committed at One and Four World Trade Center, these glittering giants are going for the globe’s elite corporations. Marquee tenants desire marquee buildings. Ten million square feet of Class A office space is set to rise in New York in the next few years, most of it underwritten by billions of dollars of public investments and tax abatements.

But as much as the city’s future competitiveness rests with satisfying the office needs of Fortune 500 companies, it also depends on attracting and nurturing startups in high-growth industries like tech, media, and design. These firms require a different sort of office space, and they’re finding it in less traditional buildings outside of Midtown’s office district.

There is rising concern that the city will not have enough flexible office space that meets the needs of startups, tech firms and creative businesses. City officials hope that it is these types of businesses that will propel the city’s economy through the 21st century, just as finance did during the second half of the twentieth.

These firms tend to shun the corporate Class A tower for more flexible spaces in Class B and Class C buildings. They are seeking space in Chelsea, Midtown South, Downtown, and Brooklyn, most often in pre-war buildings that are often cheaper and better suited to layouts preferred by high-growth industries.

“Tech companies are finding characteristics in pre-war buildings that they’re not finding in new office buildings,” says Vishaan Chakrabarti of SHoP Architects and Columbia University’s Center for Urban Real Estate. He notes that 85 percent of new, young companies are in older, pre-war buildings rather than Class A office towers.

Part of the reason is based on economics, but the preference for pre-war also reflects deeper changes in workplace culture: an aversion of the corporate aesthetic, an emphasis on collaboration, and a blurring of the lines between one’s “work life” and “social life.”

Tech and creative firms value collaboration, something that does not happen in sequestered offices on separate floors. Collaboration takes place in shared spaces, co-working stations, and other spaces intended to maximize “casual collisions of the workforce.” Pre-war buildings provide the opportunity to accommodate these arrangements in a way that is often difficult or impossible in corporate towers.

The preference for more collaborative spaces reflects foundational and long-lasting changes in the way people delineate their work lives from their social lives. It also reflects how the boundaries of the “workspace” have expanded to include our homes, our commutes, the café, and the park. It is no longer necessary to stay at one’s desk in order to work.

The workspace is now spilling out of office buildings and into neighboring parks, cafés, and even beer halls. As a result, neighborhoods matter, and young firms want 24-hour neighborhoods where jobs and housing are mixed together with restaurants, bars, and nightlife.

This type of working arrangement started with tech companies, but as Chakrabarti notes, “The reality is that most new young companies are tech companies,” including those in architecture. “I’d consider SHoP a tech company.” The upshot is that these new workplaces will become the new normal.

The move towards shared spaces means that companies need fewer square feet per worker than traditional office layouts. It also means that the single-purpose office district will become increasingly unattractive to newer firms.

 

55 Hudson Yards

55 Hudson Yards, image by Related/Oxford and Visualhouse

Growth in creative and technology firms is outpacing that in finance, and developers of Class A space may be beginning to get the message. As the website for 55 Hudson Yards proclaims, the building will feature “efficient and flexible workspace” for “a work/life integration that enhances employee performance.” 10 Hudson Yards will bridge over the High Line Park with a 60-foot public passageway through the building. One can imagine employees at Coach or L’Oreal bringing their laptops down to the park to collaborate on a new project.

But this space will surely be too expensive for the smaller firms that make up another important pillar of the city’s economy. There is an emerging consensus that the city’s focus must shift to growing the supply of Class B and C office space. The city actually lost 6.2 million square feet of Class B and C space since 2000, even as demand has heated up. The city’s Economic Development Corporation estimates that all the remaining space will be full by 2018. If more space doesn’t become available, the city risks missing out on the next wave of high-growth firms.

Seth Pinsky, former president of the city’s Economic Develoment Corporation and now with RXR Realty, recently said, “There needs to be affordable space for the small companies and start-ups we talk so much about attracting to the city,” noting that up to 15 million square feet of affordable space may be lost in the coming years.

And while some of this growth will happen in Manhattan, policymakers and developers are increasingly focusing on the Brooklyn-Queens waterfront for new job growth. While a developer needs at least $67/square foot to break even on a new development in Midtown South, only $46/square foot is needed in Downtown Brooklyn and Long Island City, according to the EDC.

Domino Redevelopment

Two Trees’ Domino Redevelopment, image by SHoP

Bellwethers include the Watchtower properties, with 1.3 million square feet of space, and the New Domino development’s 500,000 square feet of office space. Smaller conversions like 1000 Dean Street and 29 Ryerson Street, both in Brooklyn, will also be a critical component of any strategy to grow space for startups and creative firms.

The de Blasio administration is also rethinking the role of industrial zones along the Brooklyn-Queens waterfront. Planning commission chair Carl Weisbrod recently talked of industrial zones in Long Island City, musing whether “the city can manufacture space by going vertical for industrial use, allowing businesses to expand.” His idea of vertical manufacturing spaces sounds a bit like the type of space favored by tech and creative startups.

The challenge is that Class B and C office space often doesn’t command the rents necessary to cover the cost of adaptive redevelopment, not to mention new construction. “We get the sense that the marketplace is struggling to build new office space for these newer kinds of companies,” says Chakrabarti.

He suggests that the city step in to provide assistance to property owners in older commercial buildings to upgrade their facilities and broadband access. “There needs to be a new type of building, a ‘Class T’ building that gets away from the A, B, C classification.”

Others warn about losing valuable commercial space to residential use. The EDC predicts that another 12 million square feet of Class B and C space will be lost to residential conversions in the next 12 years. There is also talk that the de Blasio administration is considering whether housing should be allowed in the city’s industrial zones.

Jonathan Bowles of the Center for an Urban Future commented on Long Island City’s industrial zones, “I think that we ought to be looking; should that be preserved, tech companies in the next few years may be able to go there—or creative businesses.”

While the city must ensure that construction, transportation, and warehousing firms have a space in the city, there are definitely places where housing and jobs can coexist. Chakrabarti explains, “This isn’t just about housing, it’s about the ecology of people’s lives. We want to start building these communities where people can walk to work or bike to work.”

This was central to the plan at New Domino, and “At Domino, there’s an intent to build the ecology of an entire neighborhood.” (The fact that local politicians would more readily accept a density boost if it came in the form of office space probably didn’t hurt either.)

The city should also consider the live/work approach when reevaluating its plans for Midtown East. Both commercial and residential space should be included in new buildings, with a higher allowable density to ensure that enough new office space is still built. Conversions should not necessarily be discouraged, as more residents and uses would breathe new life into the neighborhood, with the Financial District offering a prime example of resurgent vitality due to similar conditions.

Housing is also a vital component at Hudson Yards, as is the pedestrian environment. The more employees arriving by bike or via The High Line, the more successful the neighborhood will be.

As the nature of the office market changes—preferences, workplace culture, the blurred lines between the office and the surrounding neighborhood—developers and policymakers must react. By focusing on growing startup-friendly buildings—especially in Brooklyn and Queens—the city can work to replace the exodus of manufacturing employment. And by rethinking established office districts as opportunities for additional residential development, the city can meet the needs of tomorrow’s high-growth firms.

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Posted in Architecture | Downtown | Midtown | New York | Office | Residential | SHoP | Uncategorized | Vishaan Chakrabarti

Construction Update: 135 West 52nd Street

135 West 52nd Street

Construction is making rapid progress at 135 West 52nd Street, where the former Flatotel is being converted into condominiums. Joseph Chetrit and David Bistricer are the developers, while CetraRuddy is the project’s architect.

135 West 52nd Street

135 West 52nd Street

The New York Times recently revealed renderings of the light fixture that will bisect the facade, which Thierry Dreyfus is designing; the feature will stand 423 feet tall, though permits indicate the structure will top-out 498 feet up. 135 West 52nd Street will have 109 condominiums in total.

135 West 52nd Street

135 West 52nd Street

YIMBY recently discussed the renovation with John Cetra, and the conversion will completely transform the 48-story building. Besides the tower of light, the entire exterior is in the process of re-cladding, as the old facade was in a state of extreme disrepair.

135 West 52nd Street

135 West 52nd Street

Aesthetically, the transformation will result in a significant improvement; despite its status as a work in progress, the new facade is already far more attractive than the old, and 135 West 52nd Street resembles an extremely tall and glassy wedding cake. The exterior appears to borrow from One Madison, though the former Flatotel’s built form is an obvious departure, and the tower is both shorter and wider than its 23rd Street cousin. Still, the resemblance is there.

135 West 52nd Street

135 West 52nd Street

Sales for the project have already launched, and completion of 135 West 52nd Street is likely by early 2015.

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Posted in 129 West 52nd Street | 135 West 52nd Street | Architecture | CetraRuddy | Chetrit Group | Construction Update | David Bistricer | Flatotel Conversion | Joseph Chetrit | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Residential

Nordstrom Tower to Become World’s Tallest Residential Building at 1,775 Feet

Nordstrom Tower, 3D Model and architectural diagrams

YIMBY has the latest drawings of Nordstrom Tower, courtesy of an anonymous tipster close to the project. Scoping documents also include the actual height numbers: 225 West 57th Street‘s facade will top-out 1,479′ above street level, while a surprise spire on top will cap the tower at 1,775 feet. Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill are designing the building.

Nordstrom Tower

Diagram of the Nordstrom Tower’s roof and spire, 1,775′ up

New York City’s skyscraper boom is entering unparalleled territory, and 225 West 57th Street could very well represent the crest of the current wave, assuming the tower is financed. The new height details will result in several superlatives: Manhattan will finally retake the ‘tallest roof’ in the United States from Chicago’s Willis Tower, which stands 1,451′, and 225 West 57th Street will become the tallest residential building in the entire world, surpassing both 432 Park Avenue and Mumbai’s World One Tower.

Nordstrom Tower

Nordstrom Tower, south elevation along 57th Street

Structural drawings indicate the curtain wall will be accompanied by steel fins and aluminum louvers, and the result should become a contemporary icon on the Manhattan skyline.  The talented Otie O’Daniel created 3D models of the tower based on the drawings and schematics, which give better insight into the building’s eventual appearance — though the images are not official renderings.

Nordstrom Tower

Nordstrom Tower — rendering by Otie O’Daniel

225 West 57th Street’s design has seen modifications since vague renderings were presented to Landmarks during the debate over the tower’s cantilever, which will rest over the historic Arts Students League. Additional protrusions have been eliminated, and the ultimate design appears to be far sleeker than the original proposal.

Even the cantilever appears to be well-integrated, adding additional heft to the stem of the actual tower, which rises after several setbacks in a style befitting the wedding cake-shape of Manhattan’s traditional skyscrapers. The result is aggressive, and the tower’s ultimate pinnacle will stand over 300 feet taller than any other manmade objects in Midtown, piercing the nascent plateau emerging around the 1,400-foot mark.

The Nordstrom Tower

The Nordstrom Tower

In terms of contemporary comparisons, the design looks to draw from Smith + Gill’s Trump International Tower in Chicago, which is also replete with setbacks and ends in a distinctive but far shorter spire; indeed, it almost looks like a merger between Trump and Willis, though the notched indentations at Nordstrom will be far less intrusive than the setbacks on the former Sears Tower.

Extell’s latest development will have a collection of superlative titles, but its (hopefully) imminent rise underscores the velocity of New York’s general ‘supertall’ boom, which is now the most impressive on the planet. In Midtown alone, other supertalls on the near-horizon include 111 West 57th Street, 432 Park Avenue, 53 West 53rd Street, 3 Hudson Boulevard, 30 Hudson Yards, and 35 Hudson Yards, all of which are already under construction or on their way.

Nordstrom Tower

Nordstrom Tower — rendering by Otie O’Daniel

While the Nordstrom Tower’s roof height will be the tallest in the Western Hemisphere, its pinnacle will fall one foot shy of One World Trade Center’s, which begs the question of whether Extell could simply add a few dozen feet to snatch the crown. Such a feat would not be unprecedented, and what ultimately signals resilience is continued progress; instead of deferring to the “Freedom Tower,” 225 West 57th Street should surpass it, returning the title of Manhattan’s tallest building to Midtown on a more permanent basis.

Completion of 225 West 57th Street is currently slated for 2018, and the most recent permits — which were partially approved on July 1st — reveal a total scope of over 1.2 million square feet.

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Posted in 217 West 57th Street | 225 W57th | 225 West 57th Street | Extell | The Nordstrom Tower

Construction Update: 605 West 42nd Street

605 West 42nd Street, photo by Colin Miller

Construction is chugging along at Moinian’s 605 West 42nd Street, which is now reaching into the sky; besides vertical progress, the first of the tower’s glass has also appeared, and has begun to wrap around the structure. Goldstein Hill & West is the project’s architect, which is over one-third of the way to its 60-story pinnacle.

605 West 42nd Street

605 West 42nd Street, photo by Colin Miller

The Commercial Observer recently reported that the Bank of China is providing Moinian with $550 million to complete construction of 605 West 42nd Street, which hopefully heralds additional funding for other major residential projects underway in New York City.

605 West 42nd Street

605 West 42nd Street, photo by Colin Miller

 

While the push for office development in Midtown West has been substantial, plans for Silverstein’s 520 West 41st Street demonstrate the neighborhood’s pent-up demand for new apartments, which is throttled by New York State’s limit on residential FAR, and zoning that encourages office rather than residential development.

605 West 42nd Street

605 West 42nd Street, photo by Colin Miller

As previously reported, 605 West 42nd Street will stand 656 feet tall, with a total of 1,189 units, making it the largest apartment building in New York City. Completion is expected at the end of 2015.

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Posted in 605 West 42nd Street | Architecture | Atelier II | Construction Update | Goldstein Hill West | Midtown | Midtown West | Moinian | New York | Residential

Revealed: 424 West 55th Street

424 West 55th Street

With the church-like whitewashed brick theater now gone, an excavator has made an appearance at 424 West 55th Street, as has an on-site rendering. As YIMBY previously reported, a seven-story, 17-unit apartment building will rise on the site (we’re betting it’ll be rentals, based on the PTACs pictured below the windows).

424 West 55th Street

424 West 55th Street

The structure will be unfortunately stout for its location, just a few blocks from the booming 57th Street corridor and Columbus Circle, thanks to the Special Clinton District. The site’s zoning only allows an apartment building with a floor-area ratio of 4.2, making it uncontextually small compared to some of the pre-war buildings around it.

An example of the zoning disconnect is a 12-story commercial building directly across the street erected a full century ago that’s nearly three times as dense as 424 West 55th is allowed to be. (And people wonder why housing costs in New York City are spiraling out of control.)

424 West 55th Street

424 West 55th Street

The designer listed on the building permit is Aufgang Architects, while the developer is the Arker Companies, which, according to the portfolio of residential projects posted on its website, mainly busies itself with affordable housing. Completion of 424 West 55th Street is slated for the winter of 2015.

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Posted in 424 West 55th Street | Architecture | Arker Companies | Aufgang Architects | Construction Update | Hell's Kitchen | Midtown | New York | Residential

Permits Filed: 11 West 37th Street

11 West 37th Street, image via Google Maps

The first permits are up for a new hotel at 11 West 37th Street, in Midtown. Michael Kang is the architect, and DOB filings list WL Group Construction as the developer, though The Commercial Observer reported that Sam Chang acquired the site for $8.5 million back in January.

11 West 37th Street will stand 18 stories tall, and the building will span 24,684 square feet, making it quite compact; the hotel will have 68 rooms.

Michael Kang’s portfolio does not signal a promising future for the site, which is located at the epicenter of the ugly hotel boom, at the edge of the Garment District. Sam Chang’s involvement also portends an unfortunate end-product.

The West 30s are being increasingly dominated by anti-urban hotels, with nearby projects including developments at 38 West 36th Street and 60 West 37th Street, which is just down the block from 11 West 37th Street.

11 West 37th Street

11 West 37th Street, aerial via Google Maps

 

Regardless of the site’s potentially unattractive future, the scope of the project will be very limited, so 11 West 37th Street’s impact on the streetscape and skyline is likely to be minimal. Once again, it is up to the city to discourage unattractive development; given everything that has been built in recent years, it would be prudent to abandon the notion that manufacturing will ever return to the Garment District. Clinging to false hope has resulted in the current wave of street-wall-defiling hotels, and the surge will continue until macro-level changes occur.

No completion date for 11 West 37th Street has been announced, but demolition permits for the existing low-rise are lacking, so construction is not quite imminent.

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Posted in 11 West 37th Street | Architecture | Hotel | Michael Kang | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Sam Chang

Revealed: 520 West 41st Street

520 West 41st Street, via the draft EIS

Preliminary renderings are up for Silverstein’s 520 West 41st Street via the project’s draft Environmental Impact Statement, which affirm the building’s status as one of the largest in Manhattan, given it will stand 1,100 feet tall. More impressive is the actual floor-count of approximately 106, which will surpass all other skyscrapers on the island.

520 West 41st Street

Massing diagram, via the draft EIS

The development’s scope is going to be a game-changer for the far West Side, and the massive injection of new retail space — totaling 300,000 square feet, if current plans are approved — would be a catalyst for walkability. The EIS notes that 520 West 41st Street will also include 175,000 square feet for corporate apartments, as well as 1.14 million square feet of residential space — split between 1,400 apartments — for a gross of 1.685 million square feet.

520 West 41st Street

520 West 41st Street, via the draft EIS

While the height of 520 West 41st Street will be impressive, the most notable aspect of the tower is its sheer size, which also presents a turning point New York development has long needed: as ‘supertall’ technology continues to advance, buildings of 1,000′+ will no longer be restricted to the uber-rich. This means that mass-market towers that cater to all demographics are on the near-horizon, yielding new opportunities for satiating demand, and constructing supply where it is most needed.

Indeed, 520 West 41st Street will have more units than the combined total of every other residential supertall either proposed or under construction in New York City. Even the project’s affordable component — which will total approximately 280 apartments — will have more units than projects like 432 Park Avenue and 217 West 57th Street.

While all-super-luxe skyscrapers are not a bad thing, the scope of Silverstein’s tower proves that 1,000′+ buildings can help solve the affordability crisis.

With approximately 106 levels, the ‘floor-count’ at 520 West 41st Street will be unprecedented amongst residential towers in the United States. The development will also have the most apartments of any building in New York City. Alternate visions for the site presented attractive and forward-thinking possibilities, but the EIS scoping documents push the kind of density and verticality that Manhattan sorely needs.

520 West 41st Street

520 West 41st Street, via the draft EIS

The site is just a short walk from 10th Avenue and 41st Street, which was supposed to hold a station for the 7-line extension, begging the question of that improvement’s ultimate completion. Funding was apparently lacking, and while the full build-out of the platform was cancelled, awarding nearby developers additional FAR in exchange for cash to complete the project should be considered; as-is, the far West Side is two long blocks removed from subway access.

Construction on 520 West 41st Street is tentatively slated for 2017, and completion is expected by 2020. The building will open its doors to a West Side that is significantly more attractive than today, and the view to the site’s south will be unrecognizable, as the entire first phase of Related’s Hudson Yards will be complete — in addition to projects like 3 Hudson Boulevard, and developments that have not yet been announced.

Buildings like Silverstein’s proposal at 520 West 41st Street are precisely what New York City needs, and by building taller, denser, and to 21st-Century standards, developers will ultimately be able to meet the needs of city residents.

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Posted in 514 Eleventh Avenue | 520 West 41st Street | Architecture | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Renderings | Residential | Silverstein | Supertall

New Details: 3 Hudson Boulevard

3 Hudson Boulevard, image by Neoscape

A tipster sent along the link for 3 Hudson Boulevard’s new website, which has all the details for the soon-to-be supertall, as well as views from the top of the tower. The project’s architect is FXFOWLE, and Moinian is developing; a recent report indicated that the project has secured a ground loan, which means that construction is now imminent.

3 Hudson Boulevard will stand 1,050 feet to its pinnacle, and will contain a mix of uses; tenants have the option of turning the entire building into offices, but given the incredible demand for elevated residences, condominiums on the upper floors would appear to be likely. The tower will total 1.8 million square feet, and the fact sheet has additional specifications.

The tower’s impact on the skyline will be significant, given its location on 11th Avenue, which guarantees permanent visibility from New Jersey — at least pending an eventual redevelopment of the Javits Center. While the largest buildings at Related’s Hudson Yards development will be taller, those towers will be located to the southeast; the skyscraper is directly to the north of 55 Hudson Yards.

3 Hudson Boulevard

View from the 60th floor looking south, image via Moinain

Views will be impressive, and the tower’s perspective over the Midtown skyline will be particularly noteworthy; the build-out of the rest of the neighborhood will enhance the vistas with additional architectural icons.

3 Hudson Boulevard

View from the 60th floor looking east, image via Moinian

Besides its elevated profile, 3 Hudson Boulevard will also contribute to the pedestrian sphere, and the project will front directly onto the new Hudson Boulevard and Park. Renderings reveal the fountains and landscaping that will define the tower’s interaction with the subway station, and the end result will greatly enhance a portion of Manhattan that is currently barren, creating a walkable and pedestrian-friendly environment.

3 Hudson Boulevard

3 Hudson Boulevard — plaza next to 7-line stop, image by Neoscape

Completion of 3 Hudson Boulevard is expected in 2018.

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Posted in 3 Hudson Boulevard | Architecture | FX Fowle | Hudson Yards | Midtown | Midtown West | Moinian | New York | Office | Renderings | Supertall

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