Revealed: 405 East 60th Street

405 East 60th Street today, image via Google Maps

The first renderings for 405 East 60th Street on the Upper East Side have been posted on SLCE’s website; the building will be developed and occupied by Ronald McDonald House — which serves pediatric cancer patients — though plans have been on-hold for several years.

405 East 60th Street

405 East 60th Street — image via SLCE

The Ronald McDonald House is currently located at 405 East 73rd Street; the charity’s move will be minor, keeping it on the Upper East Side. RMH’s website has additional details on the organization’s mission, but maintaining proximity to treatment facilities is crucial. At both its former and current location, patients are close to thirteen treatment facilities, providing access to some of the best healthcare in the world.

While the eastern edge of the Upper East Side has traditionally been a nexus for healthcare, local NIMBYs would rather scuttle plans for state-of-the-art facilities; the battle over Memorial Sloan Kettering’s new cancer treatment center was vigorously opposed by neighborhood activists, though Kettering’s facility was ultimately approved. Besides MSK’s new building, another outpost for New York Presbyterian will soon rise at 445 East 68th Street.

Renderings of the new Ronald McDonald House depict a 16-story structure that will be fairly simple, with aesthetics characterized by large, floor-to-ceiling windows. 405 East 60th Street traversed ULURP early last decade, and the site has all the allowances needed for the new development, though DOB permits were disapproved in 2008. Nevertheless, those documents revealed the new RMH will have slightly over 90,000 square feet of space, with 74 units.

405 East 60th Street

405 East 60th Street — image via SLCE

Recent filings – approved on the 14th — indicate the existing 405 East 60th Street will see “facade and roof repairs,” possibly as a pre-cursor to demolition. No completion date for the re-development has been announced, but per SLCE, construction was initially planned for 2010.

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Posted in 405 East 60th Street | Architecture | Hospitals | New York | Ronald McDonald House | SLCE | Upper East Side

Permits Filed: 151 East 78th Street

The former 151 East 78th Street -- image via Google Maps

Plans are moving forward for a 16-story residential development at 151 East 78th Street. The site comprises two townhouses — bought back in 2012 — as well as the former Ackerman Institute, which spans 149-151 East 78th Street. Renderings appeared late last year, and permits for the new building indicate the developer is Spruce Capital, while the architect is the highly-acclaimed Peter Pennoyer.

The first images paint a classically-inspired picture, and though the glimpse is limited, the structure will be clad in traditional brick and limestone, blending seamlessly with its Upper East Side surroundings. Though the development will be visually similar to existing neighborhood buildings, its prices will likely be far higher, given the spacious layouts and state-of-the-art finishes.

151 East 78th Street

151 East 78th Street — image via Spruce Capital

Besides the enhancement of the street-wall, the facade’s aesthetics appear to be stand-out, and should guarantee that units fetch top-dollar. Plans for 151 East 78th Street include fourteen units in total; all residences will be full-floor or larger, including a maisonette and three penthouses.

151 East 78th Street

151 East 78th Street — image via Spruce Capital

Permits indicate the project will total just over 58,000 square feet; that translates into an average of approximately 4,000 square feet per unit. 151 East 78th Street is clearly aiming for super-luxury status, which is warranted by the location, and its ambitions will be assisted by the design. No completion date has been announced, but demolition of the existing structures is underway, and sales are about to begin.

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Posted in 151 East 78th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Peter Pennoyer | Residential | Spruce Capital | Upper East Side

Demolition Imminent: 1711 First Avenue

1711 and 1713 First Avenue -- image from Google Maps

Demolition permits have been filed for the existing structure at 1711 First Avenue, signaling the end to a saga that began in 2009, when initial plans for a tower were filed. Minuit Partners acquired the site for $8.5 million back in 2011, and after a lawsuit against the old owners, apparently things are back on track.

Though there have been no recent permits for the building, the 2009 filings revealed a 21-story and 46-unit residential tower. The architect of record was Daniel Goldner, but the old plans are likely dead. The new developer is Anbau Enterprises, which seems to lean towards historically-minded designs; Goldner’s work is decidedly contemporary.

The Schedule A from the original proposal indicated that the project would cater to the boutique luxury segment of the market; floors three through ten were to have three units each, and floors 11 through 21 were to have two residences per level. Additionally, the ground floor was to have slightly over 3,000 square feet of retail space.

With development rights of over 70,000 square feet, the future tower could definitely go taller, though the previous plans stretched the air rights quite efficiently. Any additional height would likely require most units to be full-floor, and it seems unlikely that the surrounding neighborhood would warrant ultra-luxury construction.

The assemblage also includes 1713 First Avenue, and 354 East 89th Street; permits for the former’s demolition have also been filed.

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Posted in 1711 First Avenue | Anbau Enterprises | Architecture | Construction Update | Daniel Goldner Architects | New York | Residential | Upper East Side

Permits Filed: 203 East 92nd Street

203 East 92nd Street -- site layout, image from the DOB

Fresh permits are up for Related’s new project at 203 East 92nd Street, which will stand 36 stories tall. The architect of record is Handel, and the structure will be mixed-use; lower levels will be occupied by offices and a school, while the tower portion will contain 308 residences. The City Planning Commission granted approval to the plans this past August.

203 East 92nd Street

203 East 92nd Street, viewed from the East — image from the DOB

Renderings were also attached to the latest filings, and indicate a fairly typical design; the facade will be a mix of masonry and glass. The images conceal the building’s irregular octagonal shape, which will add a touch of flair to an otherwise reserved concept. Certainly, 203 East 92nd Street will be far more attractive than surrounding towers; aesthetically, the neighborhood suffers from a blight of post-war buildings.

203 East 92nd Street

203 East 92nd Street — viewed from the South, image from the DOB

203 East 92nd Street saw a fair deal of controversy after Related announced intentions to develop the site, which housed Ruppert Playground; neighborhood NIMBYs opposed the project without any solid ground, and consequently, plans are now moving ahead.

Per The Wall Street Journal, initial plans were for a 49-story tower; evidently those have been shelved in favor of Handel’s shorter building. Foundation work has been approved and work should be underway shortly, though no completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 203 East 92nd Street | Architecture | Handel Architects | New York | Related | Residential | Upper East Side

Vertical Expansion: Philip House

Philip House -- image from Redundant Pixel

Philip House, at 141 East 88th Street, is seeing a vertical expansion, and YIMBY sat down with architect Alan Rose to discuss the approximately 13,000 square foot addition. The new space atop the existing roof will allow for five new penthouses, and the one unit currently on the market is listed for $11.5 million.

YIMBY in bold.

How did you create the space?

The addition began with two water towers on either end with Palladian arches, and two penthouses [originally] built for staff. The old units will be demolished, making way for new ones between the water towers. Actually, the arches match the water towers.

What were the challenges with adding to a pre-war building?

There was one major issue; because the structure is residential, the load for floors is 40 pounds per square foot. Adding floors is difficult because the columns were not designed for the additional load, so we had to utilize light construction techniques; luckily contemporary materials fit the bill, so there’s lots of metal siding and glass. There is a certain cache to traditional architecture, but nowadays it is not really traditional — we wanted to be consistent with the pre-war details, but we still wanted to focus on glass. The siding is steel.

Philip House

Philip House — image from Redundant Pixel

Going forward, what are some techniques you see future developments using that can take advantage of ‘light’ construction?

Pre-fab is going to be very big, and it will make things much more affordable. We’re just starting to work with pre-fab walls and floors, and modules; the change is enormous.

Do you see these methods being used on luxury construction?

No — while pre-fab is impressive, I think we see it applied to more mundane things, like dormitories. There’s a certain attraction in the upper market to uniqueness, and pre-fab does not cater to that.

Philip House

Philip House — image from Redundant Pixel

And what about the penthouses at Philip House do you like most?

Well, there will be five new units, with three duplexes. Those are impressive, but the sense of scale is very important, and if you look at the addition, it relates more to a house than a building. The penthouses sit above the mass of the old structure, and really have an intimate sense about them, despite being located atop [Philip House].

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Posted in 141 East 88th Street | Architecture | New York | Philip House | Residential | Upper East Side

Demolition Imminent: 445 East 68th Street

Existing buildings to be demolished -- image from Google Maps

Medical development typically flies under the radar, but the scope of New York’s hospital boom is now becoming apparent; yet another expansion is underway, at 445 East 68th Street. Permits have been filed and approved for the demolition of an existing 12-story residential building, which will make way for a 15-story expansion of New York Presbyterian Hospital.

While the new building will only be 15 floors, it will stand 341 feet tall; the incorporation of ample light and space is crucial for modern medicine, as light is an effective tool for sterilization — and the patient experience will also improve.

NY Press reports that the development will be located on York Avenue, spanning the block between 68th and 69th Streets. Two buildings will be demolished to make way for the new structure, which was initially supposed to house both an ambulatory care center and a maternity hospital, totaling over 560,000 square feet.

DNA Info reports that while the ambulatory care center will still be built, the maternity portion has been put on-hold; the new structure will still contain the same amount of space, with the option to build-out the interiors of the maternity ward when funding is secured.

The Upper East Side is currently a hotbed for medical development; Memorial Sloan Kettering is building a 1.2 million square foot cancer center, while Cornell’s medical campus will be located nearby, on Roosevelt Island.

Completion of Presbyterian’s new facility is expected to take 42 months, and the new building should open by 2017.

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Posted in 445 East 68th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Hospitals | New York | New York Presbyterian | Upper East Side

Construction Update: 45 East 60th Street

45 East 60th Street

Machinery is on-site and excavation is about to begin at 45 East 60th Street, which will host Stern’s third-tallest skyscraper in Manhattan. Developed by the Zeckendorfs, the tower will eventually soar 780 feet. The building will integrate a minor cantilever over its eastern neighbor, but the overhang will be minimal, and its vertical profile will barely be impacted.

With 45 East 60th Street and 220 Central Park South both underway, Stern may become the undisputed champion of luxury starchitecture; combined with 15 Central Park West, the trio of towers should become the most expensive buildings in the entire city. While the 57th Street supertalls may have height, Stern’s structures have the benefit of location.

45 East 60th Street will eventually hold 40 units, and completion is set for 2015.

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Posted in 45 East 60th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Zeckendorfs

Excavation Update: 337 East 62nd Street

337 East 62nd Street

Work has begun on a mysterious new project located at 337 East 62nd Street, which has absolutely no public information available. Excavation is well underway, and despite signage displaying a tentative completion date, there are no facts or figures anywhere online – except via permits from the Department of Buildings, which reveal that the structure will rise seven floors and contain 22 units.

Perhaps a partial explanation for the lack of details lies with W&L Construction, which is working on the project; the company was part of the corruption scandal that ensconced City Comptroller John Liu. The Epoch Times has the full story, which is replete with twists, turns, and Chinese gang connections – though W&L’s involvement was apparently limited to Liu’s campaign purchasing ads for the company in major Chinese newspapers.

In sum, it does not seem like W&L avails itself to transparency – at least not in the case of mayoral campaigns, or with regards to 337 West 62nd Street. On-site signage indicates the project will be complete by the spring of next year, though with excavation just beginning, that target seems optimistic. Nevertheless, at only seven floors, the final result should be relatively benign filler, even if the architect is Peter Poon.

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Posted in 337 East 62nd Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Peter Poon | Residential | Upper East Side | W&L Construction

Construction Update: Two Sutton Place North

Two Sutton Place North

Cladding is finally progressing upwards at Sheldon Solow’s 420 East 61st Street – aka Two Sutton Place North – which had stood naked for several months; now, the building is beginning to match the adjacent One Sutton Place North, and will soon be entirely covered in its 70s-esque facade.

Black glass has already had its day in New York architecture, which makes its choice for the facade of Two Sutton Place quite bizarre; though One and Two Sutton Place are twins, it’s rather odd to see new construction look so retro, even before completion. Besides the cladding, which is only noteworthy because it is passé, Two Sutton Place is a simple, inoffensive box.

While buildings facing the East River should be held to a higher design caliber given their location, which guarantees permanent prominence, One and Two Sutton Place are actually somewhat hidden, as Roosevelt Island sits between the buildings and Queens. Indeed, Roosevelt Island is actually easier to get to than 420 East 61st Street, as the entrance to the tram is closer to Midtown than Two Sutton Place is. The tower is literally adjacent to the Queensboro Bridge and FDR Drive.

Despite Two Sutton Place North’s removed location, prices will be expensive, as the neighborhood is still technically the Upper East Side. No details regarding the exact number of units have been released – and public information regarding anything about the tower has been sparse – but it is scheduled for completion in 2014, and rises 43 floors and 450 feet.

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Posted in 420 East 61st Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Residential | Sheldon Solow | Two Sutton Place North | Upper East Side

Demolition Update: 45 East 60th Street

45 East 60th Street

The old buildings have been cleared at 45 East 60th Street, the first milestone in the construction of a new 780-foot tower under development by the Zeckendorfs. Designed by Stern, the only public images so far are drawings, but they paint a very attractive picture – the design will draw from classic inspiration, typical for Stern, and justified by the building’s prime location.

No firm details beyond drawings and construction permits have been released, but it’s safe to assume that prices will break records. 45 East 60th Street has the best location of any residential skyscraper currently under construction in New York, situated between Madison and Park Avenues at the foot of the Upper East Side – the side street isn’t exactly quiet, but it’s a far cry from the rancor of 57th Street, where several taller towers are under construction. 45 East 60th will also offer panoramic views that will be mostly unobstructed, as the development is situated to the north of Midtown’s future supertalls.

Permits indicate the skyscraper will have a total of 40 units, a testament to the development’s uber-luxury potential – and now that demolition is complete, excavation can begin.

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Posted in 45 East 60th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Starchitecture | Upper East Side | Zeckendorfs

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