Permits Filed: 606 West 57th Street

606 West 57th Street

A few months after TF Cornerstone won approvals for its massive, 1,000-unit-plus development on the Far West Side, SLCE Architects has filed for building permits for the apartment building at 606 West 57th Street.

The filing puts the building’s total construction area at a whopping 1.2 million square feet, on par with Midtown office towers rather than apartments. Of that, 952,938 square feet will be dedicated to apartments, plus another 40,000 square feet for retail space. The building will rise 42 stories, reaching 440 feet into the air, and will contain 1,028 apartments – meaning it will no longer be in the running for highest unit count in the city. SLCE is the architect of record, but Miami-based Arquitectonica is responsible for design.

606 West 57th Street

606 West 57th Street, image by TF Cornerstone

The tower wraps around a holdout structure on the southwestern corner of 57th Street and 11th Avenue, and will replace a Lexus and Acura car dealership. The area around far West 57th Street is currently in transition from a low-slung car dealership row to a high-rent residential neighborhood, capitalizing on 57th Street’s rising cachet and the revitalization of Columbus Circle three avenues to the west. TF Cornerstone also told YIMBY that they’re looking to see if there’s any community interest in retaining the mid-century neon vertical parking sign on the 57th Street frontage, preserving a bit of the strip’s history and avoiding a repeat of the Kentile controversy in Brooklyn.

Neon sign on West 57th Street, photo from Google Streetview

Neon sign on West 57th Street, photo from Google Streetview

The permit filing comes after newly-elected Upper West Side councilwoman Helen Rosenthal cut a deal with the developers to make the building’s “affordable” units more accessible to wealthier residents. In exchange for adding about 20 more units of below-market rentals, she allowed TF Cornerstone to up the lowest-priced units’ maximum income restriction from 40 percent of the area median income to 60 percent. She also negotiated a new income band, reserving some units for families making 175 percent to 230 percent of area median income – meaning a family of four must earn between around $147,000 and $193,000 a year to qualify for the lottery for those apartments.

Groundbreaking should occur in the fall, according to the developer.

Talk about this topic on the YIMBY Forums

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 606 West 57th Street | Helen Rosenthal | SLCE | TF Cornerstone

Construction Update: 40 Riverside Boulevard

40 Riverside Boulevard, photo by Colin Miller

Construction has made major headway at 40 Riverside Boulevard on the Upper West Side, which has now topped-out. Extell is the site’s developer, and Goldstein Hill & West is the architect of record.

40 Riverside Boulevard

40 Riverside Boulevard, photo by Colin Miller

Permits reveal a total scope of 527,350 square feet, which will be mostly residential, divided amongst 274 apartments. 40 Riverside Boulevard will also include a 7,846 square foot commercial component and 2,926 square feet of community facility space; the tower stands 345 feet tall.

40 Riverside Boulevard

40 Riverside Boulevard, photo by Colin Miller

With cladding now rising, the project’s appearance continues to evolve, though it should be relatively attractive; larger buildings stand to the north — and will soon rise to the south — relegating 40 Riverside Boulevard to ‘filler’ status. Its location guarantees permanent visibility on the overall skyline when viewed from New Jersey, but eye-catching structures like Durst’s 625 West 57th Street will become focal points, drawing attention away from the 33-story tower.

40 Riverside Boulevard

40 Riverside Boulevard, photo by Colin Miller

While 40 Riverside Boulevard will complete the ‘Riverside South’ development initially begun by Trump, the site abuts the ‘Riverside Center‘ project, where construction is just beginning. As growth continues, new development will continue to transform a formerly barren location into a vibrant, walkable, and desirable neighborhood, bringing the southwest corner of the Upper West Side to its full potential.

40 Riverside Boulevard

40 Riverside Boulevard, photo by Colin Miller

Completion of 40 Riverside Boulevard is expected in 2015.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 40 Riverside Boulevard | Architecture | Construction Update | Extell | Goldstein Hill West | New York | Residential | Upper West Side

New Look: 207 West 75th Street

207 West 75th Street, image by JBS Project Management/Morris Adjmi

UPDATE: Per a reader’s tip, 207 West 75th Street is actually not Landmarked, and the site had to go through BSA review rather than the LPC, which grants special permits.

The proposal for a new building at 207 West 75th Street has seen revisions, though whether the project will be built at all following irrational NIMBY opposition remains to be seen. Morris Adjmi is the architect, and the developer is Felipe Coello of The Philippe at W 75ST NY LLC.

207 West 75th Street

207 West 75th Street, image by JBS Project Management/Morris Adjmi

Permits for the development were disapproved back in 2011, but indicate a total scope of 26,865 square feet, and the project would be entirely residential. The building would stand 14 stories and 176 feet tall, replacing an existing two-story low-rise that is occupied by a tanning salon.

Local NIMBYs against the original proposal were led by a former TV host. While the notion that a 14-story building is ‘tall’ is difficult to comprehend, community ravings against 207 West 75th Street look even more ridiculous when the proposal is compared to the structure next-door, which is already far taller.

207 West 75th Street

207 West 75th Street & 215 West 75th at left, image by JBS Project Management/Morris Adjmi

Opposition hinged on the building being a ‘sliver,’ which was a red herring for neighbors that simply wanted to block new development. Adjmi’s initial scheme was both attractive and contextual, and would have blended perfectly into its surrounds. As expected, the NIMBY swarm reportedly live inside 215 West 75th Street, which will lose its lot-line window views once 207 West 75th Street is built.

The new design has seen slight revisions to the upper levels, where penthouse glass has been reduced, but the overall height has seen a slight increase. The proposal’s appearance is about the same — and if/when it is built, it will become a positive addition to the Upper West Side – but despite the alterations, plans apparently remain on-hold.

207 West 75th Street

207 West 75th Street, image by JBS Project Management/Morris Adjmi

Located inside a historic district, the Plans for 207 West 75th Street show how the Landmarks BSA process can be used by NIMBY groups to grandstand based on selfish personal interests — in this case, the loss of ‘views’ that were never guaranteed to begin with.

207 West 75th Street

207 West 75th Street, image by JBS Project Management/Morris Adjmi

No completion date for 207 West 75th Street has been announced, but JBS Project Management’s page on the site — which is where the new images come from — indicates a 36-month completion time-frame.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 207 West 75th Street | 215 West 75th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Morris Adjmi Architects | New York | Residential | The Philippe W 75 LLC | Upper West Side

Rooftop View: 732 West End Avenue

View over the Hudson River

YIMBY recently toured 732 West End Avenue, and the views from the building’s rooftop are impressive. The development stands 16 stories tall, and has 14 units in total; construction was controversial due to the neighborhood’s NIMBY politics, despite the fact that the resulting structure is contextual, and actually stands shorter than the adjacent tower. The site’s developer is Sackman Enterprises, and the architect is William Nicholas Bodouva + Associates; TOWN is handling marketing and sales.

732 West End Avenue

Hudson River Panorama — zoomable photo at link

While 16-story buildings would be dwarfed in Midtown or the Financial District, the relatively low-rise surrounds result in unobstructed western views, and the building’s vistas over the Hudson River are comprehensive.

732 West End Avenue replaced two townhomes, and the resulting outcry resulted in a new historic district, stretching between 70th and 109th Street along West End Avenue. Efforts to halt practically all new development on the Upper West Side have been successful, and it seems that 732 West End will be one of the last new structures to rise along the thoroughfare.

732 West End Avenue

Looking out over West End Avenue

As constricted supply yields ever-rising prices, many of the neighborhood’s existing residents will likely be displaced by wealthier newcomers. Eliminating new development may preserve old buildings, but it does not preserve populations — which is often the actual goal of landmarking.

732 West End Avenue

732 West End Avenue at center

732 West End proves how irrational local NIMBYs can be, as the building fits perfectly into the streetscape; contrary to popular opinion, the Upper West Side does have an abundance of under-utilized land, and contextual new development — like Sackman’s project — is definitely a good thing.

The building is nearly complete, and work is now wrapping up on interiors.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

 

Posted in 732 West End Avenue | Architecture | New York | Residential | Sackman Enterprises | Upper West Side | View | William Nicholas Bodouva + Associates

New Renderings: Riverside Center’s Portzamparc Plan

Riverside Center -- image by Christian de Portzamparc

While Portzamparc’s master plan for Riverside Center may or may not have fallen by the wayside, new renderings from the architect’s website give a better glimpse of the scheme, which promises to revitalize a slice of the Far West Side with several new buildings, with the overall aesthetic reminiscent of the nearly-completed 400 Park Avenue South.

Riverside Center was approved by the City Council at the end of 2010, and the overall development will be transformative; what had been desolate parking lots and storage facilities will soon become soaring residential skyscrapers, with extensive neighborhood amenities located in the project’s pedestrian sphere. In addition to 2,500 units and a 250-room hotel, the plan envisioned approximately 250,000 square feet of commercial space, as well as a new school, a cinema, a 2.76-acre public park, and additional affordable housing.

Riverside Center

Riverside Center — image by Christian de Portzamparc

The Portzamparc master plan ultimately won the support of neighborhood politicians, but it appears that changes for part of the project are likely imminent; part of Riverside Center was parceled off to Dermot, and the resulting monstrosity — which has now commenced construction — offers a decided departure from the initial vision.

Rather than the rendered towers of crystalline glass, the Dermot building would become a blocky and ungainly addition to the Far West Side. While neighborhood context is admittedly minimal — given the surrounds were only built in recent years — nearby developments include Durst’s BIG-designed Pyramid, and the market for attractive architecture is clearly there.

Riverside Center

Riverside Center — image by Christian de Portzamparc

Luckily Dermot’s building is being held up by a crane dispute, though it would seem unlikely that the delay will result in a design change. Nevertheless, the latest renderings via Portzamparc show the true potential of Riverside Center, and hopefully the architect’s scheme is utilized in the development of subsequent parcels.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Dermot | Extell | New York | Portzamparc | Renderings | Residential | Riverside Center

Rooftop View: One Morningside Park

Midtown View from One Morningside

Construction is wrapping up on One Morningside Park, located on the corner of Manhattan Avenue and 110th Street, and YIMBY recently ventured up to the top of the building for some photos of the views. GF55 Partners designed the project, and 110 Manhattan Equities LLC is the developer.

Central Park view from One Morningside

Central Park view from One Morningside

Most of One Morningside’s exterior is now complete, and the project has 54 units in total. While the penthouse has not yet hit the market, sales have been swift, and the building is close to sold-out; as of January, only 30% of units remained available.

Midtown panorama from One Morningside

Midtown panorama from One Morningside

As the photos show, the building is located in a neighborhood dominated by mid and low-rise structures, and its relative isolation allows for sweeping views over Harlem and The Upper West Side. The upper reaches of Central Park are prominent, as is the Midtown skyline; looking closely, 432 Park Avenue is beginning to edge into the distant horizon, which it will soon dominate.

Harlem view from One Morningside

Harlem view from One Morningside

While the Midtown skyline is relatively far away, One Morningside’s vantage point over Harlem is especially impressive, as the view offers a true sense of the neighborhood’s built form. Though the landmarked areas of Lower Manhattan are most frequently compared to European cities, South Harlem’s density is overwhelming and almost Parisian-like, given the overwhelming number of pre-war structures and lack of high-rises.

One Morningside

One Morningside, photo from this past January

Completion of One Morningside Park is expected later this year.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | GF55 Partners | New York | One Morningside Park | Residential | Upper West Side

Permits Filed: 8 West 70th Street

8 West 70th Street -- image via PBDW

New permits are up for a long-stalled project at 8 West 70th Street, which is being developed by Congregation Shearith Israel; the building has faced an ongoing battle from local NIMBYs. The architect of record is Platt Byard Dovell White, and the firm’s website has renderings of the planned design.

The tenacity of the neighborhood NIMBYs is evident from their website opposing the development, which looks to have been made in 2003; it has been continually updated with incoherent ramblings and frequent typographical and grammatical errors, but the ultimate motive against the Congregation’s mixed-use expansion appears to be the potential loss of views from a neighboring structure, at 18 West 70th Street. Opposition to the development hinges on it being an “inappropriate condominium tower,” when in reality it will only stand nine stories tall, and will in fact be significantly shorter than typical buildings on West 70th Street.

8 West 70th Street

8 West 70th Street — image via PBDW

A presentation by Grubb & Ellis has ample photographic evidence of the decrepit old structure that the new 8 West 70th Street will replace; it also includes images of the ‘views’ to be blocked, which are already obstructed by rooftop equipment atop Congregation Shearith Israel. The motives behind the neighborhood opposition are obviously selfish, and entirely centered on preserving perspectives that were already partially obstructed; how any nine-story development in New York City could be considered a tower is insane, especially in a neighborhood as dense as the Upper West Side.

8 West 70th Street

8 West 70th Street pre-demolition, via Google Maps

PBDW’s design for the new 8 West 70th Street is aesthetically superior to many surrounding buildings, and despite its ‘contemporary’ design, it will fit into its pre-war surrounds with ease. The expansion will enhance the street-wall along West 70th Street, while also providing Congregation Shearith Israel with much-needed space on the structure’s lower floors.

The previous new building permits were disapproved in June of last year, but indicated that 8 West 70th Street would have 41,565 square feet in total; 21,551 square feet will be split between four residences, with the top two floors to be dedicated to a duplex. Each of the other units will span an entire floor, as well, with additional details available on the project’s Schedule A.

8 West 70th Street

8 West 70th Street — image via PBDW

While the Upper West Side generally lacks ultra-luxe developments outside of its southern bounds, 8 West 70th Street could be a contender for some of the most expensive residences in the neighborhood. No completion date has been announced, but given the new filings, construction appears to be imminent.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 8 West 70th Street | Architecture | Congregation Shearith Israel | New York | Platt Byard Dovell White | Residential | Upper West Side

Revealed: 175 West 60th Street

175 West 60th Street, viewed from the north

Major headway is occurring on the next phase of the Fordham Lincoln Center redevelopment, as work continues on Glenwood’s new tower at 175 West 60th Street. Given that foundations have now been poured, verticality should be imminent; the architect of record is The Stephen B. Jacobs Group, and the firm has released the first full reveal of the project.

175 West 60th Street

175 West 60th Street — image via the SBJ Group

175 West 60th Street will eventually stand 48 stories and 533 feet tall, with 256 units in total. The building will be slightly shorter than its neighbor at 160 West 62nd Street,but it will still be visually prominent on the Upper West Side’s relatively short skyline; the new Fordham-adjacent cluster will add significant density to the immediate vicinity, which has long been under-utilized.

175 West 60th Street

175 West 60th Street

The lower stretch of Amsterdam Avenue has long been neglected; recently, Gale Brewer killed plans to re-develop two dilapidated schools in the neighborhood — one of which is across the street from 175 West 60th Street — which would have been replaced with new and modern facilities at the base of residential towers. Nevertheless, progress is still occurring, however piecemeal.

175 West 60th Street

175 West 60th Street

In terms of square footage, permits indicate the vast bulk of the tower — which measures 289,908 square feet — will be dedicated to the residential portion, with the ground-floor retail confined to 664 square feet. That translates into an average unit size of slightly over 1,100 square feet.

Per the on-site signage, completion of 175 West 60th Street is expected in the spring of 2016.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 175 West 60th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Fordham University | Glenwood | New York | Residential | SBJ Group

Permits Filed: 203 West 79th Street

203 West 79th Street -- image via Google Maps

The first permits have been filed for a new 16-story building at 203 West 79th Street; the architect of record is Morris Adjmi, and the project’s developer is Anbau Enterprises.

203 West 79th Street will stand 174 feet to its pinnacle, and the filings indicate the structure will be mixed-use, with an emphasis on ultra-high-end residential. The building will measure 67,265 square feet in total, with 5,088 square feet to be dedicated to retail space; the remainder of the site will be residential.

With only 24 units, residences will average nearly 2,600 square feet each, which is on the large and ’boutique luxury’ side of things; the Upper West Side is sorely lacking in almost any new housing, and the redevelopment of 203 West 79th Street will be very beneficial to the neighborhood, where many derelict structures from the past remain due to over-aggressive landmarking.

Carlton House — which will be cleared to make way for Adjmi’s building — is a definite example of one such structure. The building only stands five stories tall, and air conditioners protrude from the facade. Improving the neighborhood’s aesthetics and its tax base will result in a win-win for both New York City and the Upper West Side.

No completion date has been announced.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 203 West 79th Street | Anbau Enterprises | Architecture | Construction Update | Morris Adjmi Architects | New York | Residential

Permits Filed: 1047 Amsterdam Avenue

1047 Amsterdam Avenue -- via DNA Info

A slew of documents have been filed with the DOB for 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, which will add two residential structures to West 113th Street. Per Curbed, The Brodsky Organization is developing the towers, while the architect of record is Handel. The site is located adjacent to The Cathedral of Saint John the Divine.

1047 Amsterdam Avenue

1047 Amsterdam Avenue — site plan, via the DOB

1047 Amsterdam Avenue will measure nearly 331,000 square feet in total; the bulk of the space will be dedicated to residential, with permits indicating the tower will hold 428 apartments, spanning 15 floors. Approximately 1,500 square feet of space will be occupied by a community facility, as well.

St. John’s has run into controversy over its plans, though the church has committed to preserving the undeveloped portions of its land following the construction of 1047 Amsterdam Avenue. The new building will sit over the quarry pits previously used for the cathedral’s stone, which could mean St. John’s will remain perpetually unfinished.

Rising 149 feet in total, the residential tower will be quite close to the cathedral, and will nestle into the northern end of the site, along 113th Street. Given Handel’s track record, the development should be contextually sensitive, and early renderings look to confirm that notion. While not totally similar, the first glimpse does bear some semblance to 170 Amsterdam Avenue, and 1047 Amsterdam Avenue’s exterior should be similarly appealing, and unique.

1047 Amsterdam Avenue

1047 Amsterdam Avenue — massing diagrams, via the DOB

Per DNA Info, Brodsky’s 99-year lease will generate $5 million for St. John’s per year, allowing the cathedral to remain open. The development will have two components — with a visual gap, so the church’s transept remains visible — and the buildings will be connected by stairs. No completion date has been announced.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 1047 Amsterdam Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Handel Architects | New York | Residential | St. John The Divine | The Brodsky Organization | Upper West Side

YIMBY News

You have been reading YIMBY for 60 seconds.

That’s the time it takes to read our Saturday newsletter, which summarizes the week’s TOP 5 stories.