Permits Filed: 265 Van Brunt Street

265 Van Brunt Street -- image via Google Maps

The first permits are up for a new residential development at 265 Van Brunt Street, in Red Hook. The DOB filings — which come with a notice at the bottom that they are ‘for zoning review only’ — were submitted on behalf of Cheever Development, and OCV Architects is designing the project.

265 Van Brunt Street has a storied recent history, which begs the question of whether local NIMBYs will seek to preserve the current one-story garage on site; it served as a heroin mill as recently as 2011.

Clearly, the garage’s redevelopment will be beneficial to the neighborhood, and permits indicate the development’s total scope will measure 18,327 square feet, with the entirety of the new building to be dedicated to residential space. 265 Van Brunt Street — which also has an address of 102 Visitation Place — will have 19 units in total, spanning three floors.

Other than a fling with illegal activities, the existing structure has no notable attributes, though the surrounding neighborhood is certainly of interest; unfortunately, it was devastated during Hurricane Sandy, when it became part of New York Harbor. Per The New York Times flood map, the entire block was submerged, with the surge rising up to six feet above street level.

NY Times Flood Map, 265 Van Brunt Street

Flooding at 265 Van Brunt Street, outlined in dark blue; map via the New York Times

Indeed, with regards to surrounding buildings, “garden-level apartments [were] depopulated, and even the ones that have been cleared of mud and sodden belongings [reeked] dankly of mold.”

The design of 265 Van Brunt Street will have to take flood-mitigation measures into account, given the location’s extreme vulnerability to storm surge events. Nevertheless, the resurgence in Red Hook is promising, and hopefully Cheever’s development signals a larger push for new, storm-resistant housing.

With regards to the above, the planned three-story height of 265 Van Brunt may be unwise, given the entire first level will be prone to flooding; the city has been negligent in establishing new zoning standards for neighborhoods impacted by Sandy, where additional height to avoid future flooding should be highly encouraged. It is impossible to move a flood zone, but designing buildings that can withstand future events with minimal impacts should be a top priority.

No completion date for 265 Van Brunt has been announced, but demolition permits for the existing garage were filed on the 17th, so progress is evidently imminent.

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Posted in 265 Van Brunt Street | Architecture | Cheever Development | Construction Update | New York | OCV Architects | Red Hook | Residential

New Renderings: The Kestrel, 33 Caton Place

The Kestrel, at 33 Caton Place -- image by DJ Associates

A tipster has submitted new renderings of 33 Caton Place, which has been dubbed The Kestrel; yesterday, Brownstoner reported that Halstead Property Development Marketing has been tapped to handle marketing and leasing. The building was designed by DJ Associates Architect PC and Luca Andrisani Architects, and the developer is Sam Boymelgreen.

Permits indicate the development has 116,843 square feet of space, which is divided between 126 residences; that translates into an average apartment size of approximately 900 square feet, and the project is a mix of studios, one, two, and three-bedroom units. The Kestrel stands eight stories tall.

The Kestrel

Living room rendering — image by DJ Associates

The new renderings reveal a dynamic facade, characterized by a mix of masonry and metalwork; the building’s exterior will also be dotted with small balconies. After the sixth floor, the setback will yield to several terraces.

Aesthetically, The Kestrel looks appealing, though the quality of the metalwork will determine the final grade of its appearance. The project’s green roof is plainly visible in the latest rendering — unlike the previous reveal — with grass sprouting above the building’s top floor. While the vegetation may have been slightly dramatized, a green roof is a good thing regardless of the height of the grass.

The Kestrel

The Kestrel — 33 Caton Place

Completion of 33 Caton Place is expected this year, with leasing set to begin next month.

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Posted in 33 Caton Place | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | New York | Residential | The Kestrel | Windsor Terrace

Revealed: 223 North 8th Street

223 North 8th Street today -- via Google Maps

Renderings are up for 223 North 8th Street, a new 95-unit development in Williamsburg. The architect of record is IBI Group Gruzen Samton, and the developer is Westbrook Partners. The images are from Alexander Briseno’s Behance portfolio, which has a trove of information on additional projects, as well.

223 North 8th Street

223 North 8th Street, viewed from North 9th Street — image via IBI Group Gruzen Samton

Buzz Buzz Home first reported on 223 North 8th Street back in August, when a plan exam for the project was filed; now that renderings are up, it appears that designs have been finalized, though initial construction permits were disapproved back in November.

223 North 8th Street will total 72,000 square feet, translating into an average unit size of approximately 750 square feet. That likely indicates an abundance of studio and one-bedroom apartments, which is ideal for the young professionals who are increasingly dominating Williamsburg’s demographic profile.

223 North 8th Street

223 North 8th Street — image via IBI Group Gruzen Samton

IBI Group’s design for the seven-story structure appears fairly standard, though the balconies detract from the building’s aesthetics; the cladding appears to be brick.

While no completion date has been announced for the project, the push for approval via the Department of Buildings likely indicates that construction is imminent.

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Posted in 223 North 8th Street | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | IBI Group Gruzen Samton | New York | Residential | Westbrook Partners | Williamsburg

New Renderings: Domino Redevelopment

Domino Redevelopment -- image from SHoP

New renderings have been revealed in an Environmental Impact Statement for Two Trees‘ Domino Redevelopment in Williamsburg, which will bring dramatic changes to the Williamsburg waterfront. The project is enduring the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure for a second time after Vinoly’s vision was tabled and the site traded hands; approval for the new SHoP-designed proposal seems likely, although several steps remain before construction can begin.

SHoP has several major projects in the works, but the firm’s plans for Domino will be especially high-impact. The site will have five structures overall, and each of the buildings will feature components arranged in creative ways; besides the old factory, which will be renovated and expanded, the actual towers will push and re-define new development in New York City.

Domino Redevelopment

Domino Redevelopment — image from SHoP

Domino’s skyscrapers will vary in height; the factory’s addition will bring it to 16 floors, and the shortest of the new buildings will stand 17 stories. All of the other towers will be over 40 floors, with the tallest — within ‘Site D’ — rising 565 feet.

Domino Redevelopment

Domino Redevelopment — image from SHoP

The entirety of the project will add over three million square feet of mixed-use space to the Williamsburg waterfront, with the bulk of the development dedicated to residential. Changes between the SHoP and Vinoly’s plans include a small decrease in housing units, and a major increase in office space; the revised scope calls for 2,282 apartments, and approximately 500,000 square feet of offices, in addition to 115,000 square feet that will be dedicated to retail and a health club.

Domino Redevelopment

Domino Redevelopment — image from SHoP

SHoP’s vision is a major improvement compared to the previous scheme, reducing parking by 644 spots, and adding an additional two acres of open space. Besides its better layout, the aesthetics and creativity of SHoP’s plan will be additional draws; for the first time, Brooklyn will have buildings on its skyline that are distinct and iconic.

The full plan’s build-out is unlikely until the 2020s, but once ULURP is completed, construction on the first 42-story residential tower can begin.

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Posted in Architecture | Brooklyn | Domino Plant | New York | Office | Renderings | Residential | SHoP | Two Trees | Williamsburg

Permits Filed: 73 Montrose Avenue

73 Montrose Avenue - image from Google Maps

New permits have been filed and approved for 73 Montrose Avenue in Williamsburg, which will be five stories tall and hold 36 units.

The neighborhood is not exactly prime real estate, but the continued influx of new development is improving conditions; major public housing projects exist in the vicinity, acting as a bulwark against full-on gentrification. Nevertheless, ‘East Williamsburg’ is slowly but steadily seeing improvements, and 73 Montrose Avenue is a step in the right direction; the lot’s former occupant was a liquor store.

73 Montrose Avenue

73 Montrose Avenue – image from Google Maps

73 Montrose will have 30,000 square feet of residential space – so units will average just over 800 square feet – and the building will also include a small community facility of 2,700 square feet.

The developer is listed as Joel Hirsch of Montrose Park LLC, and the architect is Ernest Keller. Given the project’s small scope, and the fact that permits are very fresh, completion is likely slated for the 2015 timeframe.

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Posted in 73 Montrose Avenue | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | New York | Residential | Williamsburg

Construction Update: 40 North 4th Street

40 North 4th Street

A new residential building at 40 North 4th Street is nearing opening day; permits indicate the 7-story low-rise will have 86 units. The lot was purchased as a distressed property back in 2010, per Brownstoner.

Much of Williamsburg remains undeveloped, but the area surrounding 40 North 4th Street is booming with activity; the property is located on Kent Avenue, which forms the arterial backbone of the waterfront.

The Williamsburg waterfront is notable for its rapid transition to luxury housing, and the boom will only begin to crest as the number of available development sites continue to drop. New construction away from the shore of the East River quickly scales down to shorter buildings like 40 North 4th Street, and the only major towers planned are at the Domino redevelopment.

40 North 4th Street

40 North 4th Street

40 North 4th’s architect is Elena Kalman, and the developer is Matarese/Mandella LLC. Completion is expected in 2014.

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Posted in 40 North 4th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Residential | Williamsburg

Construction Update: 1 North 4th Place

1 North 4th Place

The facade on Douglaston Development’s 1 North 4th Place is now rising, and the 40-story tower is taking its place front and center on the Williamsburg waterfront. Designed by FXFowle, the latest of the Northside Piers towers will have 510 units, and – per the website - extensive amenity features, as the neighborhood’s “first highrise rental project.”

1 North 4th Place

1 North 4th Place

Though the tower is over 400 feet tall, 1 North 4th is removed from the heart of Williamsburg, so its impact is only noticeable within a few blocks of the East River. While 40 floors is somewhat large, it is nothing out of the ordinary for New York, which shows how short the Williamsburg skyline is.

The biggest change to come will be the SHoP-designed Domino redevelopment to the west of 1 North 4th Place, which will contain four towers that are over 500 feet tall. Combined, the projects will add over 2,700 new residential units to the waterfront, invigorating the only part of Williamsburg where pedestrians remain relatively scarce.

1 North 4th Place

1 North 4th Place

Completion of 1 North 4th is slated for 2014, and units will range from studios to three-bedrooms.

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Posted in 1 North 4th Place | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 282 South Fifth Street

282 South Fifth Street during demolition

Demolition is in full swing at 282 South Fifth Street in Williamsburg, which will soon give rise to a 13-story tower designed by Morris Adjmi Architects. YIMBY reader Paul sent in photos of progress, which has been significant – the site’s original occupant was a three-story bakery, which is now mostly debris.

282 South Fifth’s design actually bears some similarity to 432 Park Avenue, though on a much smaller scale – and without the 10 by 10 foot window panes. The buildings have similarly protruding facades, though unlike 432 Park, 282 South Fifth relates to the street through a large podium. Luckily 282 South Fifth’s base is the same height as neighboring buildings, thus maintaining the minimal street wall.

Regardless of the dissonance between the future facade of 282 South Fifth and the frontage of adjacent historic structures, the new building will be a major improvement compared to the old bakery. The space above the podium will be occupied by gardens and an outdoor cinema, as well; the design is certainly functional.

With deconstruction almost complete, excavation can soon begin. Completion has been tentatively scheduled for 2014, and 282 South Fifth Street will offer a total of 82 units.

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Posted in 282 South Fifth Street | Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | Morris Adjmi Architects | New York | Residential

Renderings Released: Northside Piers’ 1 North 4th Place

The terribly (and hopefully tentatively) named 1 North 4th Place, part of the development at Brooklyn’s Northside Piers, finally has new renderings. The images show the tower’s detailing, which isn’t terribly impressive. Developers in Brooklyn and Queens continue to build Miami-esque high-rises along the East River, and 1 North 4th certainly fits that mold.

Permits filed with the Department of Buildings show the building’s future height will be 398 feet, making it one of the tallest buildings in Williamsburg. The project will also contain 498 units. Ground has been broken, but photos from this past week show the site entirely flooded due to Hurricane Sandy’s storm surge, and no date for the resumption of construction has been set.

1 North 4th Place, Northside Piers New York
1 North 4th Place, Northside Piers, Image from Douglaston Development
1 North 4th Place, Northside Piers Brooklyn NYC
1 North 4th Place, Northside Piers Cul de Sac, Image from Douglaston Development

Posted in Architecture | Brooklyn | Construction Update | Hurricane Sandy | New York | Northside Piers | Renderings | Residential

New Hotel Coming to Williamsburg

Most of the development proposed for Williamsburg has been residential–a twist has finally been added, with an iconic hotel now proposed adjacent to the Williamsburg bridge. The design is the winner of a competition, and the new hotel is slated to rise 440 feet.

Image from Architects/Newspaper Blog via Oppenheim
Designed by Chad Oppenheimer, the new hotel is a stark departure from what characterizes the low-rise neighborhood at the moment, but that isn’t a bad thing. The design is certainly striking, and while three adjacent boxes would normally provide for blandness, that certainly isn’t the case here. The triangular windows are an excellent juxtaposition against the hotel’s three “domino” components, and the elements work together to create a building that is very sleek, modern, and fitting for the newly-chic neighborhood. 
Image from Architects/Newspaper Blog via Oppenheim
The hotel will certainly be rather prominent in the Williamsburg skyline when it is completed, as most new construction is still below 400 feet in height. You can see the Domino Sugar Factory in the rendering above, though–immediately to the right of the uppermost section of the new hotel–which will be where over 2,000 new residential units will soon be under construction. The immediate neighborhood is going to see tremendous development over the next decade, and this hotel project along with the multitude of other residential developments are a tremendous start. 

Posted in Hotel | Williamsburg

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