Renderings Revealed: 41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street's pinnacle, image by KPF

After last week’s post on the latest DOB filings at 41 East 22nd Street, a tipster passed along additional documents, complete with renderings, that reveal the full scope of the project. The site’s developer is Continuum — headed by Bruce Eichner — and the architects are Kohn Pederson Fox and Goldstein Hill & West.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, image by KPF

While the previous drawings were comprehensive, the new renderings offer significantly clearer details on the skyscraper, which will become the tallest building between Midtown and Lower Manhattan. Plans may have undergone slight revisions since the included images were conceived in November, but they appear to be very similar to the most recent DOB filings. The tower will eventually stand 60 stories and 777 feet tall.

41 East 22nd Street

Different angle of the project, image via KPF

Per the tipster, the concept for 41 East 22nd Street has undergone a series of evolutions, and the tower has gained height during the design process. KPF’s hand is evident, and the scheme bears similarities to the firm’s similarly glassy and jagged creations at Related’s Hudson Yards development.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street’s base, image via KPF

Perhaps the tower’s most striking element — besides its sheer height — is the cantilever, arching over neighboring buildings to the west. The ‘champagne glass’ has clearly been refined, but the base definitely resembles a stem, fluting upwards into the structure’s residential floors.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, base diagram

Glass dominates the vast majority of the exterior, but the amenity-laden base is actually clad in masonry; the new drawings note that the “design [is] pending confirmation,” but as the renderings make clear, there will be a marked contrast between the podium’s facade and the rest of the building.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, profile diagram

Despite the stone exterior, the base will still have enormous windows looking out onto 22nd Street, and the lobby of 41 East 22nd Street will be an experience unto itself. With One Madison located down the block, the neighborhood offers ample competition in terms of condominium product, but it would appear that Eichner’s 81-unit development is poised to take the super-luxe crown for all of Lower Manhattan.

Roof Diagram -- image by KPF

Roof Diagram — image by KPF

While no completion date has been announced, demolition of the existing structures is now underway.

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Posted in 41 East 22nd Street | 43 East 22nd Street | Architecture | Bruce Eichner | Continuum Company | Flatiron | Goldstein Hill West | Kohn Pederson Fox | Midtown | New York | Renderings | Residential

Revealed: 180 Myrtle Avenue

180 Myrtle Avenue -- image by Dattner Architects

The first renderings are up for 180 Myrtle Avenue, which is being developed by John Catsimatidis’ Red Apple Group; the firm is behind several buildings in the immediate vicinity, including 218 Myrtle Avenue and 81 Fleet Place. Images for the project come from Dattner Architects, which is behind the site’s design.

Permits for 180 Myrtle Avenue were partially approved last week, indicating construction is about to begin; the development will total 170,312 square feet, including a 500 square foot community facility, and 10,485 square feet of ground-floor commercial. The remainder of the building will be divided between 191 units.

Dattner’s page on the development indicates a discrepancy with regards to the DOB filings, noting the project will measure 239,000 square feet; that number is likely the accurate figure, given the source.

180 Myrtle Avenue

180 Myrtle Avenue — image by Dattner Architects

180 Myrtle will be a significant positive for the neighborhood, which is on the periphery of Downtown Brooklyn. Aerials of the site depict its surrounds, which are relatively desolate and dominated by ‘towers-in-the-park’-style public housing. Combined with adjacent sites at 81 Fleet Place and 218 Myrtle Avenue, Red Apple Group’s push to construct pedestrian-friendly development will hopefully spark several beneficial changes in the vicinity.

180 Myrtle Avenue

180 Myrtle Avenue & surrounds — image by Dattner Architects

Twenty percent of the units at 180 Myrtle will be dedicated to affordable housing, but the bigger story is the revitalization of the street-scape; Robert Moses transformed the neighborhood and isolated its residents, and while problems with the existing public housing must also be addressed, Dattner’s plan will help restore some sense of urban normalcy. Most importantly, the ground-floor retail will provide new options for both existing residents and future newcomers.

180 Myrtle Avenue will stand fifteen stories in total, and completion is expected in 2015.

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Posted in 180 Myrtle Avenue | Architecture | Brooklyn | Dattner Architects | DoBro | John Catsimatidis | New York | Red Apple Group | Renderings | Residential

Construction Update: 505 West 19th Street

505 West 19th Street -- eastern foundation

Excavation work is now complete at 505 West 19th Street, which HFZ Capital is developing. The site will soon house a pair of High Line-straddling buildings, which will be linked by a one-story connection underneath the elevated park, and the project’s architects are Thomas Juul Hansen and Goldstein Hill & West.

The site has come a significant way since last August, when excavation was just beginning. Both components will stand ten stories tall, and Curbed recently posted a series of renderings for the site, which also came with the information that the western tower will only have eight residences, compared to 27 inside its eastern counterpart. Permits indicate the entirety of the development will measure 100,480 square feet, with ground-floor commercial taking up 7,839 square feet of the total.

505 West 19th Street

505 West 19th Street, rendering via Thomas Juul Hansen

Per the official website, the project’s exterior “recalls the elegance of classic modernism while respecting the visual language and history of The High Line,” and the towers “rise up and seem to float above the refined glass and dark metal podium.”

505 West 19th Street

505 West 19th Street — western foundation

The description looks to be spot-on, though the final product will ultimately tell the tale; given the price-point of approximately $2,500 per square foot, 505 West 19th Street’s ultimate appearance should not disappoint.

Thomas Juul Hansen’s work on the project further cements the notion that buildings along The High Line are trending towards a more conservative take on contemporary architecture, as other developments like Sherwood’s 500 West 21st Street and the Tamarkin-designed 508 West 24th Street are also part of the collective ‘throwback’ movement.

505 West 19th Street

505 West 19th Street

Completion of 505 West 19th Street is expected in 2015.

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Posted in 505 West 19th Street | Architecture | Chelsea | Construction Update | HFZ Capital | New York | Residential | The High Line | Thomas Juul Hansen

Permits Filed: 55 West 17th Street

55 West 17th Street

The first permits are up for a new development at 55 West 17th Street, which Toll Brothers City Living is developing; The Real Deal reported on the site’s sale last October, when it was bought for $68.5 million. Morris Adjmi is listed as the architect of record.

Despite the lack of drawings or renderings, the filings give the first detailed look at what will likely house a host of high-end condominiums; the development’s total scope is 91,714 square feet, which includes 5,231 square feet of ground-level retail. The remaining 86,483 square feet will be split between 55 residences, averaging nearly 1,600 square feet apiece.

Toll Brothers has a penchant for high-end design, and the company’s current roster of projects includes Portzamparc’s fantastical ‘fortress of glassitude’ at 400 Park Avenue South, as well as the more traditional 1110 Park Avenue, designed by Barry Rice. Adjmi’s past designs have proven appealing to a high-end clientele, explaining the architect’s involvement at 55 West 17th Street, which will likely target the boutique luxury segment of the market.

55 West 17th Street will rise nineteen floors, and stand 200 feet in total; the Schedule A has additional specifics. The second and third levels will have six units each, with the number of residences per floor shrinking as the tower rises; duplexes begin on the 13th story, the 17th floor will be occupied by a single unit, and the penthouse will span the entirety of the top two levels.

55 West 17th Street

55 West 17th Street

No completion date has been announced, but the market in the neighborhood is increasingly lucrative; Walker Tower is located two blocks to the west, and that development has set astronomical price milestones. Given the demand for units in the vicinity — and the fact that demolition permits for the existing six-story building on-site were filed and approved in February — construction appears to be imminent.

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Posted in 55 West 17th Street | Architecture | Chelsea | Flatiron | Morris Adjmi Architects | New York | Residential | Toll Brothers

Revealed: 2415 Albemarle Road

2415 Albemarle Road -- via Google Maps

The first permits have been filed for a new building at 2415 Albemarle Road in Brooklyn, which Hello Living is developing; previous images — via Curbed — featured vague glimpses of the design, but the project’s brochure has been updated to include an actual rendering. Zambrano is listed as the architect of record.

2415 Albemarle Road

2415 Albemarle Road — image via Hello Living

Per Hello Living’s page on the site, 2415 Albemarle Road will have 44 condominiums; the DOB filings indicate the development will span 34,857 square feet, rising 12 stories and 121 feet, and the project will be entirely residential.

2415 Albemarle is located to the southeast of Prospect Park, in Flatbush, and the development will be a marked improvement to a site that is currently vacant. While the project’s design is far from starchitect-quality, it’s still a push in the right direction for Flatbush, which is just beginning to emerge as a desirable neighborhood.

Compared to the surrounding buildings, 2415 Albemarle is relatively good looking, though the frame of reference is not exactly beneficial. The development’s aesthetic looks to be inspired by Miami Beach circa 1995, with perforated balconies breaking up an otherwise bunker-like appearance.

Nevertheless, the intended price-point — per Curbed, approximately $250,000 per unit — is relatively affordable, which should be commended; not every budget-friendly development can resemble Via Verde, in the Bronx, though an effort to emulate Dattner’s genius would still be appreciated.

No completion date has been formally announced, but the late-2015 timeframe would appear most likely.

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Posted in 2415 Albemarle Road | Architecture | Brooklyn | Hello Living | New York | Renderings | Residential | Zambrano Architects

Construction Update: The Hudson Yards

7-Line Station and Hudson Boulevard

As spring has sprung, the pace of construction has picked up at Related’s Hudson Yards development, and the formwork for 10 Hudson Yards is beginning to command local prominence. Besides progress at Coach’s future headquarters, activity is also occurring across the rest of the site, and the rest of phase I will soon begin to rise.

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

The intricacies of 10 Hudson Yards’ cantilever over The High Line are obvious, as extensive formwork is now in place over the elevated park. As the Coach Tower ascends beyond the complicated lower floors, the pace of its construction should begin to speed up. The building is already looming over the end of The High Line, and by the summer, it will likely surpass 500 West 30th Street, beginning its short-lived domination of the local skyline.

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards at center; 500 West 30th Street at right, the AVA High line at left

Progress on the platform that will support several of the development’s towers is also evident, as is work on the right-of-way for Amtrak’s Gateway project, which will hopefully link New York to New Jersey with additional tunnels. Excavation equipment is well below street-level, and concrete pours for the tunnel’s foundation are evident closer to Tenth Avenue.

Amtrak Gateway Excavation

Amtrak Gateway Excavation

The scope of work at The Hudson Yards is enormous, though one piece of the puzzle is nearing completion; construction appears to be wrapping up on the new 7-line stop at 34th Street. The station is expected to open this year, along with the adjacent landscaped plaza, which will eventually be integrated into the ‘Hudson Boulevard,’ forming the neighborhood’s key pedestrian arterial.

Pavers for the new park-plaza-hybrid beckon pedestrian access, and clumps of dirt denote future hills for landscaping purposes. The 7-station’s surrounds underscore how even the ‘natural’ parts of Manhattan are man-made, though Hudson Boulevard certainly takes technology to a level that Frederick Law Olmstead could have only imagined.

Hudson Boulevard Pavers

Hudson Boulevard Pavers

Completion of the Hudson Yards’ first phase of construction is expected in 2018.

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

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Posted in 10 Hudson Yards | Architecture | Construction Update | Hudson Yards | Kohn Pederson Fox | Midtown | New York | Office | Related | Residential | Supertall

22 Thames Street Set to Become Downtown’s Tallest Residential Building

22 Thames Street, rendering from Fisher Brothers

While previous permits for 22 Thames revealed the height to its highest occupied floor, the elevation of the tower’s pinnacle remained a mystery; now, DOB documents confirm that the skyscraper will stand 960 feet in total, making it the tallest residential building in Lower Manhattan. Fisher Brothers and The Witkoff Group are developing the site, and the architect is Rafael Vinoly.

22 Thames DOB Plans

22 Thames elevation diagram via the DOB

Downtown’s race to the sky began with the new World Trade Center, but the latest round of residential towers is narrowing the gap; 22 Thames will stand just 17 feet shy of 150 Greenwich Street, located one block to the north. 150 Greenwich will still be far bulkier than 22 Thames — consequently, maintaining its prominence — but Vinoly’s latest addition to the skyline will be impressive in its own right.

22 Thames DOB Plans

22 Thames Approved, via the DOB

Per the DOB, 22 Thames will total 359,130 square feet, with retail occupying 11,435 square feet on the first two levels. The remainder of the 70-story building will be residential, with standardized floor-plates just shy of 6,500 square feet.

Perhaps the height of 22 Thames is most surprising because it will be rentals, unlike nearby skyscrapers at 56 Leonard and 30 Park Place; the market for buildings of significant height has been almost entirely dominated by product that can be bought and sold.

22 Thames Street

22 Thames Street – image from Fisher Brothers

The Financial District may soon provide proof of profitability for extremely tall rental developments, as 70 Pine Street — which stands 952 feet to its pinnacle — also happens to be undergoing a conversion to apartments. While the site is currently for-sale, 111 Washington Street could also yield a tower of similar proportions to 22 Thames.

22 Thames and 150 Greenwich

150 Greenwich looming over the site for 22 Thames Street

It seems that the Fisher Brothers’ latest venture in Lower Manhattan will provide a crucial litmus test on the demand for rental product at soaring heights, and if the condo boom is any indication, the development will be a major success. 70 Pine’s imminent lease-up will be an equally important indicator, and combined with 22 Thames, the towers could determine whether rentals in the Financial District begin to soar even taller.

22 Thames and 133 Greenwich

22 Thames Street at right, site for new Marriott at 133 Greenwich at left

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Posted in 22 Thames Street | Architecture | Downtown | FiDi | Fisher Brothers | New York | Residential | Vinoly | Witkoff Group

Rooftop View: One Morningside Park

Midtown View from One Morningside

Construction is wrapping up on One Morningside Park, located on the corner of Manhattan Avenue and 110th Street, and YIMBY recently ventured up to the top of the building for some photos of the views. GF55 Partners designed the project, and 110 Manhattan Equities LLC is the developer.

Central Park view from One Morningside

Central Park view from One Morningside

Most of One Morningside’s exterior is now complete, and the project has 54 units in total. While the penthouse has not yet hit the market, sales have been swift, and the building is close to sold-out; as of January, only 30% of units remained available.

Midtown panorama from One Morningside

Midtown panorama from One Morningside

As the photos show, the building is located in a neighborhood dominated by mid and low-rise structures, and its relative isolation allows for sweeping views over Harlem and The Upper West Side. The upper reaches of Central Park are prominent, as is the Midtown skyline; looking closely, 432 Park Avenue is beginning to edge into the distant horizon, which it will soon dominate.

Harlem view from One Morningside

Harlem view from One Morningside

While the Midtown skyline is relatively far away, One Morningside’s vantage point over Harlem is especially impressive, as the view offers a true sense of the neighborhood’s built form. Though the landmarked areas of Lower Manhattan are most frequently compared to European cities, South Harlem’s density is overwhelming and almost Parisian-like, given the overwhelming number of pre-war structures and lack of high-rises.

One Morningside

One Morningside, photo from this past January

Completion of One Morningside Park is expected later this year.

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Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | GF55 Partners | New York | One Morningside Park | Residential | Upper West Side

Revealed: 41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, via the DOB

41 East 22nd Street has flown under the radar for the past several months, but new images give a better look at what Continuum Company‘s tower will eventually look like, as the previous ‘renderings’ lacked most details. While the zoning diagrams are not encompassing of all perspectives, the accompanying information gives a more complete look at the development’s specifications. Goldstein Hill & West is the architect of record.

The skyscraper will rise 777 feet to its pinnacle, becoming the tallest building between Lower Manhattan and Midtown; 41 East 22nd will stand over 150 feet taller than its neighbor One Madison, which will lose a significant portion of its eastern views.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street, via the DOB

While the height of 41 East 22nd Street has been anticipated, the building’s form has remained somewhat more mysterious, and the design was initially compared to a champagne flute. The similarities are there, but the overall shape seems to be more ‘shard’-like, as the tower’s upper floors end in a beveled apex.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street site plan, via the DOB

With 60 floors, the building will be entirely residential. Permits indicate it will measure 372,684 square feet in total, and the Schedule A has the full run-down on floor-by-floor details; the basement will come with 16 parking spaces, and the first of the tower’s residences will be located on the sixth level.

The building will have 81 units, with full-floor residences beginning on the 49th level, and a 8,892 square foot duplex will span the 58th and 59th floors. Given the size of the upper-most penthouse — and its unparalleled views — it seems that the unit could contend for the title of ‘most expensive condominium below 23rd Street,’ though the recent transactions at both Walker Tower and One Madison will be difficult marks to beat.

41 East 22nd Street

41 East 22nd Street with One Madison in background, demolition progress this week

No completion date for 41 East 22nd Street has been announced, but demolition permits for the existing structures were issued yesterday, and the green netting of doom went up earlier this year; evidently, progress is now underway.

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Posted in 41 East 22nd Street | 43 East 22nd Street | Bruce Eichner | Continuum Company | Flatiron | Goldstein Hill West | Gramercy

Revealed: 75 First Avenue

75 First Avenue -- image via NO Architecture

The first renderings are up for an 8-story development at 75 First Avenue, in the East Village; the site’s developer is Orange Management, and the project’s designers are HTO Architects and NO Architecture.

NO Architecture’s Architizer page has additional information on the building, which apparently has to deal with byzantine fire codes; in their own words, “glass on the north facade is a gradient of glazing apertures, each floor changing the percentage of opening from low to high corresponding to more sought-after views above and more stringent fire ratings below.”

Beyond the innovative work-around of the fire codes, 75 First Avenue takes another step to minimize the appearance of mechanicals, and “roof HVAC bulkheads [will be] clad in a metal lattice framework for a vertical garden, adding desirable lushness and evaporative cooling to the roof deck.”

Integrating elements that are typically unappealing into a project’s design and turning them into beneficial attributes rather than simple afterthoughts is a hallmark of good design. The collaboration between HTO and NO appears to be promising, though 75 First Avenue is currently the subject of a stop-work order.

Permits indicate the development will span 34,055 square feet, with the bulk of the project dedicated to residential use. 8,456 square feet will be given to ground-floor retail, while the remaining 25,599 square feet will be divided between 27 units. 75 First Avenue will stand 80 feet in total.

75 First Avenue

A slightly older plan for 75 First Avenue — image via NO Architecture

Orange Management’s website gives a 2015 completion date for 75 First Avenue, and given the relatively small scope of the development, that would seem to be a likely bet.

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Posted in 75 First Avenue | Architecture | Downtown | East Village | HTO Architects | New York | NO Architecture | Orange Management | Residential

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