Revealed: SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Plans for the first phase of the Richard Meier-designed Teachers Village in Newark have been closing in on completion, but it appears that something slightly larger is on the horizon, in the form of SoMA Newark. RBH Group, which is the firm behind the Meier project, has posted new renderings of their greater plan, and — assuming the scheme is actually built — the collective change will result in the complete rebirth of the city.

While Teacher’s Village will likely result in positive changes for the surrounding neighborhood, the up-swing in Newark is clearly just beginning. Bringing Richard Meier into the project could have an avalanche of positive benefits, and the starchitect’s brand should provide the necessary pull to begin attracting additional young professionals back to the city.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s residential district, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Per RBH’s page on the project, the group working on the scheme includes “Richard Meier & Partners Architects, LLP, landscape architect Field Operations, engineers ARUP USA, Inc., and LEED consultant Viridian Energy & Environmental, LLC,” as well as others that joined “as the concept matured and the first phase development known as Teachers Village emerged.”

Clearly, RBH has a comprehensive team working on its vision for Newark, and the quality of the new renderings — as well as Richard Meier’s involvement — gives credence to the idea that a massive transformation for the city is on the near-horizon. Indeed, RBH has acquired 79 different parcels encompassing 23 acres, which have collective development rights of over fifteen million square feet.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark in 2025, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Converting Newark into a ‘Living Downtown’ is an equally important part of RBH Group’s vision for the city, with the SoMA plan bringing a significant amount of mixed-use space to the neighborhood, which will truly re-activate the old Downtown. Per renderings, the enormous office buildings are clearly the most obvious aspect of the plan, but the amount of residential space will also be significant, resulting in an active and vibrant streetscape.

Newark has a tremendous amount of potential and promise, and its recent revitalization is only beginning to accelerate; Teachers Village will open this year, but other major projects currently underway include new office buildings for Prudential, and a host of smaller residential developments. The Wall Street Journal recently reported on the gradual and sometimes rocky transition the city is facing, while still highlighting its upwards potential.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s landscape today, image from Richard Meier & Partners

The SoMA scheme would boost Newark’s vertical profile significantly, and looks to include at least one potential ‘supertall’ standing over 1,000 feet. Altogether, the plan would add three major office towers, in addition to several slender residential skyscrapers. Collectively, the high-rises could even push Downtown Newark’s height past Jersey City and Downtown Brooklyn — though the apparent goal of a 2025 completion date leaves room for alterations before all aspects are constructed.

SoMA Newark in 2015

SoMA Newark in 2015, image from Richard Meier & Partners

As prices in central locations continue to escalate into the stratosphere, the spread of development is inevitable, and pressure on New York’s peripheral nodes is finally reaching a boiling point. Imminent changes in Journal Square have so far been the best example of vertical potential, but in the near future, the growth of Newark could be even more significant. With a major airport nearby, and excellent accessibility to regional transit, the city’s renaissance is only just beginning — and as the SoMA plan illustrates, Newark may soon regain both regional and national stature.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Hotel | Newark | Office | RBH Group | Renderings | Residential | Richard Meier | SoMA Newark

In Contract: The Hudson Spire Site

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards -- image originally from Related

Following The New York Post’s report that Tishman Speyer expressed interest in the site of the conceptual Hudson Spire, Massey Knakal’s page on the listing has just been updated; the lot is now in-contract, indicating a buyer has been found.

Per the Post’s scoop, it would seem likely that Tishman Speyer has indeed acquired the Hudson Spire site; what’s most interesting about Tishman’s involvement is their apparent desire to acquire Sherwood’s adjacent parcel, as well. Combined, the assemblage could support a tower of approximately 2.5 million square feet, making it one of the largest buildings in New York City.

Tishman Speyer’s involvement with the Hudson Spire is particularly intriguing given the firm’s recent history with the Hudson Yards; Speyer actually won the original bidding process for the railyards, before the deal collapsed and Related was awarded the project. The old concept renderings for Tishman’s railyards vision come from Montroy Andersen DeMarco.

Tishman Speyer's Hudson Yards

Tishman Speyer’s Hudson Yards vision, image from Montroy Andersen DeMarco

Given the failed Tishman proposal for the Hudson Yards, the firm’s acquisition of Hudson Spire makes sense, and could result in an ultimate one-upping of Related, as the air rights available are enormous. With egos at play, anything is possible — and when it comes to profitability, which is the ultimate motivator for any developer, building tall in today’s market provides the most lucrative results.

In the context of the Hudson Yards’ recent past, the Tishman takeover of the Spire site is not surprising; while Related’s 30 Hudson Yards may become the railyards’ most notable structure, Speyer now has the option to overshadow competing developments with the neighborhood’s defining icon, especially if the resultant tower is mixed-use. 

With the demand for supertall and super-luxury residences continuing to soar, it certainly seems possible that that sour grapes could ultimately ferment into Manhattan’s tallest building. While uncertainties regarding the assemblage remain, the waiting game will soon be over.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Hudson Spire | Hudson Yards | Massey Knakal | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Supertall | Tishman Speyer

New Renderings: 111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

New renderings are up for JDS and PMG‘s future skyscraper at 111 West 57th Street, revealing the building’s steeply stepped vertical profile. The images are via SHoP, which is designing the tower.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

111 West 57th Street will dominate the immediate vicinity, as the renderings make clear; even One57, which stands just over 1,000 feet tall, will appear underwhelming when compared to SHoP’s creation. The skyscraper may or may not be dubbed ‘The Steinway Tower’ given the structural legacy that will be incorporated into the base of the new building.

The terracotta facade will be 111 West 57th’s defining feature, and bronze accents will further enhance its appearance; while the building’s form is contemporary, the creative adaptation of historically-minded materials transforms SHoP’s modern vision into something quintessentially Manhattan, and the design captures the essence of soaring verticality.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street, image via SHoP

The tower was discussed in a recent talk at The Skyscraper Museum, which is available on Youtube; the presentation features additional images and vantage points of the building.

111 West 57th Street

111 West 57th Street diagram, via Arch Record

Diagrams of 111 West 57th Street posted on Architectural Record give a glimpse of the tower’s internals, and indicate that the top penthouse will stand approximately 1,100 feet above street level; a mass-damper will rest above, with the remainder of the crown simply that — an aesthetic exclamation mark atop the Midtown skyline.

Completion of The Steinway Tower is expected by 2016.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 111 West 57th Street | 57th street | Architecture | JDS Development | Midtown | New York | Property Markets Group | Residential | SHoP | Supertall

Change of Plans: 80 South Street

80 South Street; Calatrava scheme at left, Morali's plan on right

Plans for 80 South Street are changing once again, as Howard Hughes is looking to become involved with the site; the current owner is Cord Meyer, but Hughes is looking to take a controlling interest in the project.

While the New York Post speculated that Howard Hughes’ interest in 80 South Street was due to the issues encountered at the company’s other Seaport tower, atop the Fulton Fish Market, YIMBY has learned that is not the case, and that Hughes intends to proceed with both projects.

Per a representative from the firm, Hughes has a 100% commitment to move ahead with both the current work at the Seaport and the mixed-use project.

80 South Street has seen several plans over the course of the last decade, with an initial scheme designed by Santiago Calatrava falling through during the recession; over the past two years, Morali Architects has taken the helm of the tower’s design aspect, and the most recent iteration was to stand 1,018′ to its pinnacle.

Despite the apparent progress on the Morali plan, it appears that SHoP may be taking over at 80 South Street. The firm will soon have several projects on both the Manhattan and Brooklyn skylines, with a 1,350′ tower at 111 West 57th Street set to become one of the tallest buildings in the city.

Whether SHoP is involved at all with 80 South Street remains to be seen, but given the firm’s previous work with Hughes on mixed-use projects, the speculation is justified.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Downtown | Howard Hughes | Morali Architects | New York | Residential | Seaport | SHoP | Supertall

220 Central Park South Goes Supertall

220 Central Park South as of 3/21 -- photo by Andrew McKeon

EDIT: YIMBY received word that the latest filings have a clerical error, and that 220 Central Park South’s pinnacle will remain 950′.

The never-ending slew of permits from 220 Central Park South may finally be abetting as partial approvals are in place, but the latest plan exam confirms the tower’s height increase well beyond the initial figure of 920 feet; Vornado’s tower will actually stand 1,031 feet tall, placing the tower amongst the tallest in New York City, and officially giving the building ‘supertall’ status.

220 Central Park South

220 Central Park South — rendering by Neoscape

While the increase from the previous documents is a relatively minor 81 feet, the bump means that 220 Central Park South will stand slightly taller than the almost-complete One57, which measures 1,005 feet to its pinnacle. If the Robert A.M. Stern-designed building were to rise today, it would become the tallest residential building in New York City, but given the boom along 57th Street, it will rank behind 432 Park Avenue, 217 West 57th Street, and 111 West 57th Street.

Nevertheless, the latest update to the tower’s plan is a testament to the strength of the ultra-high-end market in Manhattan, and 220 Central Park South is the probable front-runner amongst the pack of ‘supertalls’ for the title of the city’s most expensive and prestigious development. Vornado’s tower has two primary advantages, which are its location and its views, and its address also guarantees that vistas will remain perpetually unobstructed.

220 Central Park South

Drawing on-site, photo by Andrew McKeon

Accompanying the latest permits is a new on-site drawing, which offers a zoomed-out look of the project; despite the lack of detail, it seems to indicate that the design has undergone some changes since the initial renderings leaked in January, via Curbed. A minor cut-out on the building’s eastern side will help enhance the views from Extell’s 217 West 57th Street, which is already cantilevering to avoid the visual impact of 220 Central Park South; the additional height of the Stern-designed skyscraper could have come from the re-configuration of that ‘missing’ square footage.

The new permits also indicate that 220 Central Park South will stand 65 floors, with 100 units in total, and completion is expected in 2016.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 220 Central Park South | 57th street | Architecture | Construction Update | Midtown | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Supertall | Vornado

Construction Update: 432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

The latest photos of 432 Park Avenue show the tower’s core about to breach the 800 foot mark; with 600 feet to go, the skyscraper is already making a significant impact on the skyline, and it’s difficult to imagine just how tall the building is going to be.

Curbed posted a set of new renderings yesterday, as well as the floor-plan for a new $74.5 million penthouse on the 87th level that has just come onto the market. Completion of the future 1,398-foot tower is expected in 2015.

432 Park Avenue

Viewed from Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

Looking up on the corner of 57th/Park

432 Park Avenue

Base retail, viewed from 56th and Park

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue viewed from the base of Citigroup Center

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 432 Park Avenue | 57th street | Architecture | CIM | Construction Update | Macklowe | Midtown | New York | Residential | Supertall | Vinoly

New Rendering: Hudson Spire

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards -- image originally from Related

Yet another rendering is out for the ‘Hudson Spire‘ development, and in an ironic twist, the fan-created image is better than anything official that has been released so far, showing the site within the context of its future neighbors. The reader-submitted illustration uses one of Related’s previously-released Hudson Yards renderings as its base.

Assuming the Hudson Spire does rise, the building will tower over all surrounding developments, dwarfing Related’s 30 Hudson Yards, which will stand 1,227 feet. The sales materials for the Hudson Spire site indicate that the skyscraper could potentially stand 1,800 feet tall, and a spire could bring the supertall’s total height to the 2,000 foot mark.

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards

Massey Knakal — which is the site’s broker — has a page with additional information on the project, which has an official address of 435 Tenth Avenue. The eventual tower will span the entire block between 34th and 35th Streets, and available air rights total 1.2 million square feet; the actual lot’s area is 37,026 square feet.

While the site’s potential is clear, the air rights and speculated size of the tower do not exactly match; even the Nordstrom Tower has approximately 1.3 million square feet of air rights, and it will likely fall short of the 1,500′ mark. It does seem that the concept design is geared towards selling the site rather than depicting something practical, but the site could certainly support an 1,800-foot tower.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Hudson Spire | Hudson Yards | Massey Knakal | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Residential | Supertall

Vision: The New York Skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The future of New York City can be hard to visualize; while renderings do a decent job of depicting the city’s evolving profile, accurate images are few and far between. YIMBY stumbled upon the Instagram of Adrien Berger back in 2013, and his drawings of buildings capture details that renderings often leave out; the following images are the first of many that will illustrate the future skyline in all its supertall glory.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020; Torre Verre, 111 West 57th, One57, 217 West 57th, and 220 CPS

The first set of images are drawn from the perspective of the San Remo, looking south; the changes encompassing the Central Park skyline will be dramatic, as 57th Street develops into one of the densest corridors on the planet. From right to left, the drawing includes 220 Central Park South, 217 West 57th Street, One57, 111 West 57th Street, the Torre Verre, and 432 Park Avenue.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020 — 432 Park at left

Each of the new towers will be enormous, but collectively, they herald a new era for Manhattan; for the first time, buildings standing over 1,000 feet will become a common sight in New York City, adding another dimension to the urban plane. The developments span across the entire island, from the World Trade Center all the way to Central Park.

While Manhattan and Chicago have been the traditional homes of the skyscraper, New York is pulling away from its Midwestern second cousin in the super-tall department — and while cities in developing nations have temporarily taken the mantle for ‘supertall’ superlatives, Manhattan’s skyline may soon re-take the crown. Besides the towers rising along 57th Street, 175 and 200 Greenwich will add to the Downtown skyline, while the emerging Hudson Yards will create a new vertical forest on the Far West Side.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020 — draft

All told, there are approximately twenty towers of over 1,000 feet either proposed or under construction; New York is booming, and the market in Manhattan is entirely market driven, a feature that developing cities cannot boast. While NIMBYs have battled against new developments, the tide is turning, a point that Adrien’s illustrations drive home.

The Midtown skyline in 2020

The Midtown skyline in 2020, viewed from the Queensboro Bridge

All of Adrien’s prints — including a variety of other sketches — are for sale on his website.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Adrian Berger | Architecture | Illustrations | Midtown | New York | Renderings | Residential | Supertall

Construction Update: 432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue has continued its rapid ascent, and the core now stands over 750 feet above 57th Street; the tower now stands among the twenty tallest buildings in New York City. The architect is Vinoly, and the developers are CIM and Macklowe.

432 Park Avenue

Looking up!

432 Park Avenue

432 Park Avenue

As the tower continues to grow, its visibility has begun to increase significantly. The Midtown plateau has an elevation of approximately 700 feet, which 432 Park Avenue now exceeds; the skyscraper is becoming obvious when viewed from Central Park, per the below photos, and will soon dominate the skyline.

432 Park Avenue

Viewed from Central Park — photo via Andrew McKeon

Completion of the 128-unit and 96-story project is expected by 2015.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 432 Park Avenue | 57th street | Architecture | CIM | Construction Update | Midtown | Midtown East | New York | Residential | Supertall | Vinoly

Approved: 217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street's 1,550' massing diagram -- via the DOB

The Nordstrom Tower finally has all the approval permits necessary for verticality; besides the Art Students League’s overwhelming vote in favor of the air-rights transfer and cantilever, the development’s journey through the Department of Buildings also appears to be finished. Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill are designing the tower, while Extell is developing.

While the Art Students League vote was potentially up in the air, the DOB permits are more of a formality, given the tower is an as-of-right development. Though the ASL’s transfer of air rights seemingly confirms the vague renderings displayed during the tower’s journey through the Landmarks approval process, recent filings reveal the version that could rise to 1,550 feet, and 85 floors.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street — via the DOB

The zoning diagrams lack detail, but even without any textures, colors, or intricacies, the 1,550-foot version looks superior to the concept presented during the Landmarks process. Indeed, the drawings confirm that the model YIMBY posted back in October was accurate, though whatever does rise will likely have many changes.

217 West 57th Street

217 West 57th Street

Speculation that the presented version of 217 West 57th Street may not be final is reasonable, and the DOB drawings confirm that the tower’s design could still be up in the air. Per the latest diagrams, the tower smoothly glides to a pointed peak above the skyline; given the ante-upping design of 220 Central Park South across the street — and 111 West 57th Street, one block over — a design that is actually appealing seems much more likely than not.

Completion is expected by 2018.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 217 West 57th Street | 225 W57th | Adrian Smith and Gordon Gill | Architecture | Construction Update | Extell | Hotel | Midtown | New York | Nordstrom | Residential | Supertall | The Nordstrom Tower

YIMBY News

You have been reading YIMBY for 60 seconds.

That’s the time it takes to read our Saturday newsletter, which summarizes the week’s TOP 5 stories.