ODA Reveals Hypermodern Expansion of Beth Rivka School at 489 East New York Avenue, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn

Rendering of the Beth Rivkah all-girls school expansion - ODA ArchitectureRendering of the Beth Rivka all-girls school expansion - ODA Architecture

The Beth Rivka School for girls will soon begin construction on a new 12-story building, designed by ODA Architecture. In a recent reveal, the New York-based architecture firm unveiled renderings of the forthcoming development that will incorporate a series of cantilevered floors, a playful mixed-material façade, and an unusual pair of spherical structures on the top levels of the building.

Located in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, the project was commissioned by the international Beth Rivka school system as an expansion of their existing all-girls school to better serve Brooklyn’s flourishing community of Chasidic Jews, and was first revealed by Dezeen.

The 213,000-square-foot building will now incorporate a pre-school, expanded office space, fitness areas, community facilities, a cafeteria, and a landscaped rooftop playground. The two-story “spheres of play” at the apex of the structure will contain column-free, open layout spaces imagined as informal learning spaces for future students.

Rendering of the Beth Rivkah all-girls school expansion - ODA Architecture

Rendering of the Beth Rivka all-girls school expansion – ODA Architecture

The development resembles a towering atrium, with classrooms and office spaces branching off at each level. At both edges of the structure, the architects have also incorporated large cantilevers to support several outdoor spaces beginning at the building’s sixth floor. Above it all, an elegant glass ceiling appears to bisect the rooftop park and bathes the interiors in a plethora of natural light.

Rendering of the Beth Rivkah all-girls school expansion - ODA Architecture

Rendering of the Beth Rivka all-girls school expansion – ODA Architecture

Rendering of the Beth Rivka all-girls school expansion - ODA Architecture

Rendering of the Beth Rivka all-girls school expansion – ODA Architecture

A completion date has yet to be confirmed, but the structure would rise adjacent to Beth Rivka’s existing elementary school, with the new building standing at 489 East New York Avenue, in Crown Heights.

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9 Comments on "ODA Reveals Hypermodern Expansion of Beth Rivka School at 489 East New York Avenue, in Crown Heights, Brooklyn"

  1. Amazing; it’s enchanting design that I find it from your rendering, it’s not disorderly detailed from my thinking. People have to talk about its beyond future architecture, I can’t put ordinal number from first to final. Only love scene onto a building and winding or zigzag make me excited, I was devoted to developer’s brainpower so thank you that you transport new beautiful show on public. And I don’t forget myself as I am a reader on your report, there are achieved renderings you have done. (Thanks to YIMBY)

  2. David in Bushwick | May 28, 2019 at 9:23 am | Reply

    Wow! The top rendering looks like Pacman meets a computer chip. It’s impressive how open the whole design is for a somewhat closed society. The money spent for this is also impressive.

  3. Wow, amazing design and how refreshing to see modestly dressed girls that add to the context and not make it disappear.

  4. HyperVigilant | May 28, 2019 at 11:54 am | Reply

    Isn’t this East Flatbush?

    • It’s nominally PLG. It once was called Pig Town around there because of hog farming. I t depends on what area you are talking about here. Flatbush is a name that covered a lot more ground until people started carving up new names to sell real estate. So yes but also.

  5. Kenneth Grant | May 28, 2019 at 1:06 pm | Reply

    The avant-garde design – and 12-story height – seem misplaced on a quiet residential block of two-story homes.

    • You can’t see the other side of the street but it’s much taller. Not 12 stories, but taller. This is really like the line of what the Great Depression wasn’t able to erase. So the buildings accross the street were all don after the 2 was extended right before the Great Depression and street grid was rationalized. The 2 story houses that remain were and are wood shacks that don’t conform to a street grid because there wasn’t one. It’s really where New York City ends. Back in the early 20th century, this area was known for it’s hog farms. Then later this area became somewhat industrial. Near Kings County Hospital especially, with is only a couple blocks away. That area was known for it’s large storage tanks for fuel. IT’s a fascinating little corner of Brooklyn. I used to live across the street from the school. There’s a lot of layers of failed or stunted versions of a new city there. This just adds to the weird mix of thoughts that you find there.

  6. Why don’t you add some more expenses onto education–really drive that tuition up!

  7. will there be a mandatory vaccinations office in the lobby? math tuition? or the old adage: 2+2=3 when I owe, and 5, when i have to collect :-)))

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