50 Hudson Yards’ Stone and Glass Façade Nears Final Levels in Hudson Yards, Manhattan

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

Façade installation is progressing on Foster + Partners‘ 50 Hudson Yards, a 1,011-foot commercial supertall in Hudson Yards. Developed by Related Companies and Oxford Properties, the 58-story office skyscraper is the final structure in the first phase of Hudson Yards and is to be the largest structure by volume, yielding 2.9 million square feet. The site is bound by West 34th Street to the north, Tenth Avenue to the east, West 33rd Street to the south, and Hudson Boulevard to the west.

Recent photos show the state of the glass and stone curtain wall since our last update in mid-February, when the tower had just finished topping out. The façade is now roughly three-quarters of the way to the flat parapet.

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards (center). Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards (center). Photo by Michael Young

Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards (center). Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards (center). Photo by Michael Young

The safety cocoon netting is being taken apart, while several portions of the metal-framed crown are being welded into place. The fireproofing of the columns, beams, and girders is rapidly taking shape and only several floors below the pinnacle remain to be enclosed in the envelope. It’s possible that the entire curtain wall could be completed by sometime this summer.

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards (right). Photo by Michael Young

Stepping back from 50 Hudson Yards reveals the building’s massive scale and presence, despite its location tightly wedged between Bjarke Ingels Group’s 66 Hudson Boulevard, aka The Spiral, and Kohn Pedersen Fox’s 30 Hudson Yards. Nonetheless, the supertall ranks among the tallest buildings in the city and one of the largest by square footage.

Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

One notable observation was the installation of some of the tall ground-floor glass panels that will frame the main entrance across from the 7 train entrance. Sidewalk barriers and fencing still surround the full-block complex, but this is clearly visible from the escalators and nearby pedestrian plazas.

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

50 Hudson Yards. Photo by Michael Young

So far, 50 Hudson Yards has signed on major tenants such as BlackRock and Facebook, which are preparing to occupy 1.2 million square feet of office space inside the building. Facebook is also planning to occupy an additional 300,000 square feet divided across Kohn Pedersen Fox‘s 30 and 55 Hudson Yards.

50 Hudson Yards is aiming for LEED certification and is expected to finish construction and open sometime next year. A finalized date has yet to be publicly disclosed.

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10 Comments on "50 Hudson Yards’ Stone and Glass Façade Nears Final Levels in Hudson Yards, Manhattan"

  1. I love the way the groups of glass square off and extend slightly from the facade. It gives nice visual interest to an otherwise monolithic tower. Nice job.

  2. David : Sent From Heaven. | April 5, 2021 at 11:16 am | Reply

    The construction of the building looks grand and elegant, human hands are really awesome; which I mean completely assembled: Thanks to Michael Young.

    • DAVID: Could you response to my application to your school of architectural criticism? I’m always enamored by your thoughtful, and quick witted comments, and want to learn from the master.

      I can’t sleep from apprehension. Please consider my application.

  3. Peanut Gallery | April 5, 2021 at 1:22 pm | Reply

    The quality of this building looks amazing up close. I really hope that the 10th Ave side isn’t treated like an afterthought here. It’s a great opportunity to warm the street up and make the area more welcoming. Right now the buildings are so tall and lacking noticeable setbacks that it feels like there is a huge wall blocking separating Hudson Yards from the rest of the city.

  4. I love this building. Even though it is a gigantic boxy tower, it still has a lot of character, which is mostly accomplished with the nice stone grid. Speaking of which, I also appreciate the use of stone instead of some more modern materials, such as aluminum. All of this makes 50 Hudson Yards a fantastic skyscraper. Nice!

  5. Hudson Yards is becoming the biggest city in the world

  6. Is it still financially solvent?

    NYC has 20% empty office space .

    • Related is actually bankrupt now, and all its shareholders are homeless. They are giving up everything they own to finish this one project, not for money, but for love of architecture.

      • Funny, Michael. Yeah, they will be just fine. BlackRock and Facebook have already taken more than half the space in this building. Once companies have sorted out their post-pandemic space needs, top-quality space like this will fill up soon enough. My guess is 2-3 years.

  7. One of the few buildings that looks much, much better than the renderings. I wish that were also true of its neighbor, The Spiral. Great photography here!

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