111 West 57th Street’s Crane Finally Coming Down in Midtown, Manhattan

111 West 57th Street. Rendering by Hayes Davidson

Our last update on 111 West 57th Street covered the removal of the exterior hoist on the northern elevation of the 1,428-foot Midtown supertall. Now, the construction crane is rapidly being disassembled from the southern face of the world’s most slender structure. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by JDS DevelopmentProperty Markets Group, and Spruce Capital Partners, 111 West 57th Street features a height-to-width ratio of 24:1 and will yield 60 units designed by Studio Sofield and marketed by Douglas Elliman Development Marketing. The project is located on Billionaires’ Row between Sixth and Seventh Avenues, almost perfectly aligned with the center line of Central Park.

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

Recent photos show the progress of this long-awaited milestone in the project’s construction. So far it looks like workers are closing in on the halfway mark of the disassembly. Each piece of the tower crane is lowered onto West 57th Street in front of the ground floor by the low-rise podium and restored fenestration of the Steinway Building.

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

The top half of SHoP’s design with its feathered profile can now be properly appreciated from the east and west along 57th Street.

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

The view from Central Park also shows the elegant setbacks that culminate in the ornamental crown. Since our last update, the glass panels have filled in the gap where the hoist was attached.

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

It won’t be too long before the crane is fully disassembled, which should happen by the beginning of summer. The terracotta and bronze cladding on the eastern and western profiles continues to brightly shine and reflect the sunlight with its Art Deco-inspired details.

111 West 57th Street. Photo by Michael Young

111 West 57th Street should likely be completed sometime by the end of this year.

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TFC Horizon
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17 Comments on "111 West 57th Street’s Crane Finally Coming Down in Midtown, Manhattan"

  1. Every time I see 111 West 57th Street, I’m just in awe. So, so, so, so beautiful. And now with the crane coming down, we can finally almost fully appreciate it, especially with its symbolic steps. Boy, I do feel so fortunate that I have been able to witness the triumphant rise of this instant architectural landmark/icon. Wow.

  2. David : Sent From Heaven. | June 1, 2021 at 9:22 am | Reply

    The building is so tall that it excites me, and your photos made me see its beauty that the surrounding buildings look very short: Thanks to Michael Young.

  3. David in Bushwick | June 1, 2021 at 10:44 am | Reply

    It will be interesting to find out if this building and the Nordstrom Tower sway and groan as much as 432 Park Avenue with its miserable, bickering tenants.

    • Mr. Galikanokus | June 1, 2021 at 11:25 am | Reply

      Just knowing how miserable those rich people are over in 432 Park Ave gives me strange sexual powers.

    • Some sway is good, which helps relieve stress on very tall structures. Similar to airplane wings, which also aren’t totally rigid. I suppose the buyers are notified of likely swaying.

      • The 800-ton, tuned mass damper installed at the summit will not only limit the actual amount of sway but also the rate in change of sway speed to below the threshold of human detection. So, whether buyers / occupiers know of the existence of sway or not, they won’t be aware of it.

    • Randall Cummings | June 1, 2021 at 1:45 pm | Reply

      Those affluent don’t spend much time there anyway. And they might consider medication eg for flying that is utilized often.

    • edward adrion | June 5, 2021 at 9:35 am | Reply

      When I worked in the World Trade Center in the 90’s it would sway 3 feet….the water in the toilets would slosh around like you were on a cruise ship!

  4. I like how the building website has language options for Spanish, German, Russian, Chinese and Arabic. Let’s just call it Globalist Oligarch Towers and remember what it was like when America was still a nation, and not a gigantic airport arrivals lounge on sale to the highest bidders.

    The three floor penthouse for $66M is pretty sweet though. I wonder if we’ll find out who buys it.

  5. It’s already growing on me, but the height-to-width ratio still bothers me.
    I nominate Michael Young for a Pulitzer in journalistic photography.

  6. Strange & beautiful, now that the cranes are down. What century is this?

  7. Not to put too fine a point on it, finally.

  8. Empty Stick buildings are a blight on the skyline

  9. The Exxon Valdez of Buildings..

  10. Josh Steakley | June 3, 2021 at 3:40 am | Reply

    I think it’s awesome and I have been watching this building for a long time and I wish I could afford to get a look at the top looking down.

  11. edward adrion | June 5, 2021 at 9:33 am | Reply

    WOW….look at those crowded NYC streets!…..I wish it was so desolate when I worked there….my 30 minute walk from Penn Station to Rock Center would have taken just 20 minutes!!….god, I sure hope NYC makes a comeback!….Need new Republican leadership!…..but that’s not going to happen

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