Queens

27-21 27th Street

Five-Story, Eight-Unit Residential Building Planned At 27-21 27th Street, Astoria

Property owner Alan Richer, doing business as an anonymous LLC, has filed applications for a five-story, eight-unit residential building at 27-21 27th Street, in Astoria, three blocks from the 30th Avenue stop on the N and Q trains. It will measure 5,726 square feet, which means units will average a rental-sized 716 square feet apiece. Some will be duplexes, according to the Schedule A. Astoria-based Christopher Papa is the architect of record, and an existing two-story townhouse must first be demolished.



42-25 Queens Boulevard

Mixed-Use Development Planned At 42-25 Queens Boulevard, Sunnyside

Astoria-based landlord John Ciafone is planning to construct a mixed-use development at 42-15 – 42-25 Queens Boulevard, in Sunnyside, according to DNAinfo. The site is located just three blocks from the 7 train’s stop at 40th Street. The project would include commercial and/or community space on the ground floor, and residential units above, some of which may be designated affordable. Existing single-story buildings must first be demolished; a pub as well as a cinema have already vacated their spaces.


44-26 Purves Street, photo via TCSB

35-Story, 270-Unit Residential Tower Rises At 44-26 Purves Street, Long Island City

Excavation kicked off this past summer for the 35-story, 270-unit mixed-use building planned at 44-26 Purves Street, in Long Island City, and now the structure is finally rising, with concrete and rebar now to the second floor, per The Court Square Blog. Brause Realty and the Gotham Organization are developing, while FXFOWLE is designing. The project will also have 2,600 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. Completion is expected in late 2017, per on-site signage.


54-15 101st Street, rendering by Think Architecture and Design

Revealed: Affordable Passive House Rentals for Seniors, Corona

The eco-friendly form of construction known as passive house is still rare in New York City. It saves building owners more money in the long run by cutting down on energy costs. But construction costs developers more up front, because passive house demands a special kind of ventilation system, several additional inches of insulation, and extra thick windows. Few affordable housing developers are willing to take on the challenge, but HANAC—an organization that builds senior housing throughout Queens—has decided to make its low-income project in Corona a passive house building.

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