58-Story, 157-Unit Condo Tower Rises Above Street Level at 111 Murray Street, TriBeCa

111 Murray Street111 Murray Street. Photo via the YIMBY Forums by rbrome.

When YIMBY dove into the history of 101-111 Murray Street in TriBeCa earlier this summer, foundation work was underway for a planned 58-story, 157-unit residential tower. Construction on the project is now three stories above street level, as seen in photos posted to the YIMBY Forums by user rbrome. The latest building permits indicate the tower, to rise 800 feet, will encompass 479,278 square feet. The ground floor will host 2,088 square feet of retail, followed by residential units starting on the fourth floor. The apartments, condominiums, should average 2,356 square feet apiece. They will be accompanied by 20,000 square feet of luxury amenities. Fisher Brothers, Witkoff, and New Valley are the developers. Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates is the design architect while Goldstein, Hill & West Architects is serving as the executive architect. MR Architecture + Décor and Rockwell Group are designing the interiors, and Edmund Hollander Landscape Architects is designing the area around the base. Completion is expected in 2018.

111 Murray Street

111 Murray Street. Credit: Kohn Pedersen Fox / Goldstein, Hill & West Architects via Tribeca Citizen

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2 Comments on "58-Story, 157-Unit Condo Tower Rises Above Street Level at 111 Murray Street, TriBeCa"

  1. Working on 64-story in progress, nothing to compare the beginning and finish because it’s an elegance shape.

  2. This building is not bad! Not comparably the 56 Leonard “Zenga like” neo-brutalist destruction of NY Downtown, but my favorite is 30 Park Place, Real art-deco inspired white color elephant, 82 story and like a New version of famous Woolworth of Twenty First Century. While this one, 111 Murray is mirrored 50 West, also not a bad looking building at all. Everything is better than cruppy 56 Leonard, 60 stories monster, who’s architecture belongs to Thailand or Malaysia, but now we have already built it here, in our New York City, such a shame!

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