Construction Update: The Hudson Yards

7-Line Station and Hudson Boulevard

As spring has sprung, the pace of construction has picked up at Related’s Hudson Yards development, and the formwork for 10 Hudson Yards is beginning to command local prominence. Besides progress at Coach’s future headquarters, activity is also occurring across the rest of the site, and the rest of phase I will soon begin to rise.

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

The intricacies of 10 Hudson Yards’ cantilever over The High Line are obvious, as extensive formwork is now in place over the elevated park. As the Coach Tower ascends beyond the complicated lower floors, the pace of its construction should begin to speed up. The building is already looming over the end of The High Line, and by the summer, it will likely surpass 500 West 30th Street, beginning its short-lived domination of the local skyline.

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards at center; 500 West 30th Street at right, the AVA High line at left

Progress on the platform that will support several of the development’s towers is also evident, as is work on the right-of-way for Amtrak’s Gateway project, which will hopefully link New York to New Jersey with additional tunnels. Excavation equipment is well below street-level, and concrete pours for the tunnel’s foundation are evident closer to Tenth Avenue.

Amtrak Gateway Excavation

Amtrak Gateway Excavation

The scope of work at The Hudson Yards is enormous, though one piece of the puzzle is nearing completion; construction appears to be wrapping up on the new 7-line stop at 34th Street. The station is expected to open this year, along with the adjacent landscaped plaza, which will eventually be integrated into the ‘Hudson Boulevard,’ forming the neighborhood’s key pedestrian arterial.

Pavers for the new park-plaza-hybrid beckon pedestrian access, and clumps of dirt denote future hills for landscaping purposes. The 7-station’s surrounds underscore how even the ‘natural’ parts of Manhattan are man-made, though Hudson Boulevard certainly takes technology to a level that Frederick Law Olmstead could have only imagined.

Hudson Boulevard Pavers

Hudson Boulevard Pavers

Completion of the Hudson Yards’ first phase of construction is expected in 2018.

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

The Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

10 Hudson Yards

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 10 Hudson Yards | Architecture | Construction Update | Hudson Yards | Kohn Pederson Fox | Midtown | New York | Office | Related | Residential | Supertall

Vision: VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

Metropolis Magazine’s Living Cities competition has resulted in several interesting concepts, and yesterday, Curbed reported on AMLGM’s scheme for a mass of tubular towers over Queens. Another winning entry from the competition is NBRS + Partners’ vision for a development along The High Line, situated on the site now occupied by Related’s 500 West 30th Street.

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

NBRS’ page on the project gives a detailed overview of the intentions and ideas behind the structure’s design. Perhaps the most important take-away is the building’s versatility, as the ”expressive steel structure solution permits agility,” which “allows for flexible internal space planning, future proofing the base building against the pressures of demography, market and demand.”

Introducing the concept of ‘future-proofing’ is especially pertinent to the renewed debate regarding landmarking in Manhattan, as the vast majority of the city’s current building stock was not built with the distant future in mind, which is resulting in a myriad of issues across the region.

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

Designing structures that are meant to last forever should be considered and encouraged, as the vast majority of New York’s current stock was built for profit, not permanence. VIVO hits on this idea with the versatility of the tower’s exoskeleton, as the interiors can be transformed to accommodate any number of uses.

Besides the adaptability of NBRS’ vision, the building would also integrate The High Line, presenting an idea that has been touched upon but never fully embraced by developments adjacent to the park. Related’s towers at the Hudson Yards represent a step forward — with The High Line set to become an integral aspect of 10 Hudson Yards‘ lobby — but VIVO takes the park to the next level, pushing its ”vitality vertically to reach the New York skyline some 40 stories above.”

VIVO on The High Line

VIVO on The High Line, image via NBRS/Metropolis Mag

The vision for VIVO offers a forward-thinking take on vertical living that will hopefully be emulated in other sites, adjacent to The High Line or otherwise — and while 500 West 30th Street is now home to the Robert A.M. Stern-designed ‘Abington,’ opportunities for projects that truly push the envelope along The High Line remain.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | NBRS + Partners | New York | Renderings | Residential | VIVO on The High Line

Revealed: SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Plans for the first phase of the Richard Meier-designed Teachers Village in Newark have been closing in on completion, but it appears that something slightly larger is on the horizon, in the form of SoMA Newark. RBH Group, which is the firm behind the Meier project, has posted new renderings of their greater plan, and — assuming the scheme is actually built — the collective change will result in the complete rebirth of the city.

While Teacher’s Village will likely result in positive changes for the surrounding neighborhood, the up-swing in Newark is clearly just beginning. Bringing Richard Meier into the project could have an avalanche of positive benefits, and the starchitect’s brand should provide the necessary pull to begin attracting additional young professionals back to the city.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s residential district, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Per RBH’s page on the project, the group working on the scheme includes “Richard Meier & Partners Architects, LLP, landscape architect Field Operations, engineers ARUP USA, Inc., and LEED consultant Viridian Energy & Environmental, LLC,” as well as others that joined “as the concept matured and the first phase development known as Teachers Village emerged.”

Clearly, RBH has a comprehensive team working on its vision for Newark, and the quality of the new renderings — as well as Richard Meier’s involvement — gives credence to the idea that a massive transformation for the city is on the near-horizon. Indeed, RBH has acquired 79 different parcels encompassing 23 acres, which have collective development rights of over fifteen million square feet.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark in 2025, image from Richard Meier & Partners

Converting Newark into a ‘Living Downtown’ is an equally important part of RBH Group’s vision for the city, with the SoMA plan bringing a significant amount of mixed-use space to the neighborhood, which will truly re-activate the old Downtown. Per renderings, the enormous office buildings are clearly the most obvious aspect of the plan, but the amount of residential space will also be significant, resulting in an active and vibrant streetscape.

Newark has a tremendous amount of potential and promise, and its recent revitalization is only beginning to accelerate; Teachers Village will open this year, but other major projects currently underway include new office buildings for Prudential, and a host of smaller residential developments. The Wall Street Journal recently reported on the gradual and sometimes rocky transition the city is facing, while still highlighting its upwards potential.

SoMA Newark

SoMA Newark’s landscape today, image from Richard Meier & Partners

The SoMA scheme would boost Newark’s vertical profile significantly, and looks to include at least one potential ‘supertall’ standing over 1,000 feet. Altogether, the plan would add three major office towers, in addition to several slender residential skyscrapers. Collectively, the high-rises could even push Downtown Newark’s height past Jersey City and Downtown Brooklyn — though the apparent goal of a 2025 completion date leaves room for alterations before all aspects are constructed.

SoMA Newark in 2015

SoMA Newark in 2015, image from Richard Meier & Partners

As prices in central locations continue to escalate into the stratosphere, the spread of development is inevitable, and pressure on New York’s peripheral nodes is finally reaching a boiling point. Imminent changes in Journal Square have so far been the best example of vertical potential, but in the near future, the growth of Newark could be even more significant. With a major airport nearby, and excellent accessibility to regional transit, the city’s renaissance is only just beginning — and as the SoMA plan illustrates, Newark may soon regain both regional and national stature.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Hotel | Newark | Office | RBH Group | Renderings | Residential | Richard Meier | SoMA Newark

In Contract: The Hudson Spire Site

Hudson Spire + The Hudson Yards -- image originally from Related

Following The New York Post’s report that Tishman Speyer expressed interest in the site of the conceptual Hudson Spire, Massey Knakal’s page on the listing has just been updated; the lot is now in-contract, indicating a buyer has been found.

Per the Post’s scoop, it would seem likely that Tishman Speyer has indeed acquired the Hudson Spire site; what’s most interesting about Tishman’s involvement is their apparent desire to acquire Sherwood’s adjacent parcel, as well. Combined, the assemblage could support a tower of approximately 2.5 million square feet, making it one of the largest buildings in New York City.

Tishman Speyer’s involvement with the Hudson Spire is particularly intriguing given the firm’s recent history with the Hudson Yards; Speyer actually won the original bidding process for the railyards, before the deal collapsed and Related was awarded the project. The old concept renderings for Tishman’s railyards vision come from Montroy Andersen DeMarco.

Tishman Speyer's Hudson Yards

Tishman Speyer’s Hudson Yards vision, image from Montroy Andersen DeMarco

Given the failed Tishman proposal for the Hudson Yards, the firm’s acquisition of Hudson Spire makes sense, and could result in an ultimate one-upping of Related, as the air rights available are enormous. With egos at play, anything is possible — and when it comes to profitability, which is the ultimate motivator for any developer, building tall in today’s market provides the most lucrative results.

In the context of the Hudson Yards’ recent past, the Tishman takeover of the Spire site is not surprising; while Related’s 30 Hudson Yards may become the railyards’ most notable structure, Speyer now has the option to overshadow competing developments with the neighborhood’s defining icon, especially if the resultant tower is mixed-use. 

With the demand for supertall and super-luxury residences continuing to soar, it certainly seems possible that that sour grapes could ultimately ferment into Manhattan’s tallest building. While uncertainties regarding the assemblage remain, the waiting game will soon be over.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Hudson Spire | Hudson Yards | Massey Knakal | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Supertall | Tishman Speyer

Revealed: URL Staten Island

Urban Ready Living Staten Island -- image via Ironstate/Concrete

The first renderings are up for Ironstate‘s Urban Ready Living development in Staten Island, which will be located in the borough’s Stapleton neighborhood — just to the south of St. George — on the site of a former U.S. navy base. The project’s architects include the Dutch firm Concrete, as well as Minno Wasko, and its total cost is $150 million.

Urban Ready Living Staten Island

Urban Ready Living Staten Island — image via Ironstate/Concrete

While Staten Island has been removed from the latest wave of development ensconcing the city, that is beginning to change. URL Staten Island is a positive step for Stapleton, and will hopefully set the tone for other new developments in the borough’s smattering of transit-friendly locales. Proximity to ferry access is key, given the ease of commuting to Manhattan and the relatively low cost of living in Staten Island, which could drive additional construction if Ironstate’s project is a success.

Aesthetically, Concrete looks to have done a great job in designing URL Staten Island to mesh with its surrounds. The development is located directly on the waterfront, and per Ironstate, “[hundreds] of thousands of square feet will be dedicated to residential and retail purposes, intertwined with open spaces and pathways designed to encourage pedestrian activity and public gathering.”

Urban Ready Living Staten Island

Urban Ready Living Staten Island — image via Ironstate/Concrete

The actual buildings are relatively simple, and per Concrete, they will provide “affordable, compact yet spatial, partly furnished rental apartments,” with approximately 900 units in total. Residences will be located above the development’s 30,000 square feet of retail space, and the project will also include 600 parking spaces, which is a necessity given URL Staten Island’s relatively suburban location. Crain’s has additional details, revealed during the project’s groundbreaking last summer.

Urban Ready Living Staten Island

Urban Ready Living Staten Island — image via Ironstate/Concrete

Activating the Stapleton waterfront will be crucial if the neighborhood is to be turned into an example for dense, walkable, and pedestrian-friendly development, and merging the private and public spaces with extensive open areas is the best way of ensuring that URL Staten Island is a success.

Completion of URL Staten Island is likely by 2015.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Concrete Architects | Ironstate Development | Minno Wasko | Renderings | Residential | Retail | Staten Island | URL Staten Island

Revealed: 446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street -- image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

While yesterday’s renderings of HAP’s Karim Rashid-designed 329 Pleasant Avenue generated a significant amount of discussion on both sides of the aesthetic fence, the firm’s plans for 446 West 167th Street are slightly more subdued, as depicted in today’s fresh reveal. The project is rising in West Harlem near New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia Medical Center, and the architect of record is Daniel Goldner.

Permits indicate that 446 West 167th Street will stand eight stories tall, with a total of 39 units; the development’s square footage will be divided between the residential space and additional components, with an ambulatory care center to be located on the first floor, and a ‘community facility’ set to occupy space on the second level. In total, HAP’s building will have 33,149 square feet, with the majority — measuring 25,968 square feet — to be divided between the condominiums.

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street — image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

For better or worse, the plan for 446 West 167th Street lacks the pink and blue balconies that will cling to the exterior of 329 Pleasant Avenue; instead, Goldner’s design is contextual, and takes visual cues from its pre-war neighbors. The street-wall will be kept intact, and the facade will be characterized by neutral tones; overall, 446 West 167th Street will be a relatively tame addition to Washington Heights.

HAP’s page on the development discusses the project’s target demographic, which is students and professionals looking to live near their work; in their own words, “the apartments [at 446 West 167th Street] were specifically conceived for first time home buyers.”

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street, image via Google Maps

No completion date has been formally announced, and there is a stop-work order currently in effect for the site; despite this, construction permits were issued on March 3rd, and vertical progress is likely imminent.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 446 West 167th Street | Architecture | Daniel Goldner Architects | HAP | Harlem | New York | Renderings | Residential | Washington Heights

Vertical Potential: 111 Washington Street

Old plan for 111 Washington Street, image by Pinkstone Capital

While 111 Washington Street has been a vacant lot for quite some time, the team at Massey Knakal has crafted new renderings of the site’s potential, which is enormous. The project has development rights of 362,301 square feet, which have been amassed by years of gradual acquisitions; the assemblage takes air rights from four adjacent lots, as well as 105 Washington Street. The above image is of the old plan; proof of its age is the presence of the Deutsche Bank Building‘s silhouette, as that tower was fully demolished in early 2011.

111 Washington Street

111 Washington Street — image by Massey Knakal

The presented vision is a minor departure from the site’s former plan, which depicted a slightly atypical glassy box; the previous developer was Pinkstone Capital, which designed the tower using an in-house team. Permits for the old iteration were filed in February of 2013, though they are obviously no longer relevant given the expected changes to 111 Washington.

Besides the Pinkstone plan, images via Selldorf Architects may have also presented an alternative plan for 111 Washington, though the exact location of the rendered tower remains unknown; that design also matched the tower’s permitted size, and its louvered facade would have been an innovative and remarkable addition to the Lower Manhattan skyline.

Selldorf Tower

Selldorf Tower, which may or may not have been slated for 111 Washington Street

Ultimately, the delay in construction may result in a starchitect-quality design, especially given the lot’s $260 million asking price. The overriding trend in the Financial District — and really, across all of Manhattan — has been to build as tall as possible, with the recent reveal of Fisher Brothers’ 22 Thames Street likely heralding a taller eventuality at 111 Washington Street.

Indeed, the current plans for 22 Thames Street stretch approximately 360,000 square feet of air rights roughly 900 feet into the sky; 111 Washington has nearly the same square footage, and its location is equally prime to the Fisher Brothers project. While nothing formal has been revealed, the Massey Knakal rendering is likely shorter than what will eventually be built, if nearby projects are any indication of the site’s potential; given the sky-high price-tag for the assemblage, something that takes full advantage of the air rights and maximizes views would definitely be warranted.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 111 Washington Street | Architecture | Downtown | Massey Knakal | New York | Pinkstone Capital | Renderings | Residential | Selldorf Architects | Selldorf Tower

Construction Update: 30 Park Place

30 Park Place

The new Four Seasons Hotel and Residences at 30 Park Place is making rapid vertical progress, and the Robert A.M. Stern-designed building is now passing its shorter neighbors. Silverstein is developing the 67-story skyscraper, which will soon become the tallest residential tower in Lower Manhattan.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place

As of the last update, from one month ago, the tower was it its fourth floor; now that superstructure work has passed the podium levels, the building has begun to shoot upwards. 30 Park Place is now rising at the rate of two floors per week, with the simplified floor plans aiding the speed of construction.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place

The most recent permits indicate that the 937-foot tower will have 179 hotel rooms and 159 condominiums, with residences starting on the 24th floor; a mechanical level will separate the building’s components. Construction should continue at the current pace for the remainder of the tower’s rise, which means that 30 Park Place could potentially be topped-out before the end of 2014.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place

A new teaser website for the building is also up; while no new renderings have been released, it does have a penthouse view, captured in the below screen-grab. With the highest residences in the building located over 900 feet above street level, the vistas will be impressive and unobstructed — though the rapidly-rising 56 Leonard will eventually intrude on the panorama, albeit in a positive way, since the Herzog & de Meuron-designed tower will be an architectural marvel.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place, penthouse view — image via the official website

Completion of 30 Park Place is expected in 2015.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place — via YIMBY reader JPH

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 30 Park Place | 99 Church | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Hotel | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Silverstein

Permits Filed: 350 East Houston Street

350 East Houston Street -- image via Google Earth

The first permits are up for the development site at 350 East Houston Street, which uses several addresses; the lot is wedged between 2nd Street, Houston Street, and Avenue C, and the filings were registered under ’11 Avenue C.’ The Real Deal reported on the lot’s sale back in 2012, after it was bought by Hakimian for approximately $8 million; Rotwein & Blake Associated Architects is designing the new building.

350 East Houston will total 41,421 square feet; 4,550 square feet will be dedicated to commercial space, while the remainder of the building will be residential, with a total of 45 units. The development’s mixed-use nature makes sense, as the location is prime for street-front retail, despite its relative removal from the nexus of Houston Street foot traffic.

350 East Houston Street

350 East Houston Street — image via Google Maps

The site is currently occupied by a Mobil gas station, and its redevelopment will be beneficial to the surrounding neighborhood, reducing automobile traffic while eliminating a mostly-vacant lot. Indeed, gas stations are becoming increasingly rare across Manhattan, and slightly to the west, a BP will soon be redeveloped at 300 Lafayette Street.

No renderings or drawings of 350 East Houston have been released, and permits are awaiting approval; fortunately, demolishing the existing gas station should prove relatively simple. Despite the lack of any public information, construction appears imminent, and the building will eventually stand nine stories tall.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in 350 East Houston Street | Architecture | Downtown | East Village | Hakimian | New York | Residential | Rotwein & Blake Associated Architects

New Renderings: Manhattan West

Manhattan West -- image via Brookfield

Brookfield has posted a slew of new renderings to the Manhattan West website, and the images reveal additional details about the development’s ground-level components. The site’s architect is SOM.

The residential skyscraper will stand 60 stories, and will apparently have 800 units; that number is significant, and in terms of scope, the structure will approach the city’s largest apartment buildings on 42nd Street. The glimpse into the base reveals the lobby’s soaring ceilings, which are atypically enormous; the tower’s full design was unveiled in January.

Manhattan West

Manhattan West — the residential tower’s base, via Brookfield

A plaza will be located adjacent to the residential tower, and while mid-block open spaces are traditionally hallmarks of anti-urban design, the overall density of Manhattan West should ensure that the space is well-used; indeed, creating open pedestrian areas along the development’s ground-level will be key to activating the neighborhood, and ample retail will further enhance the site’s appeal.

Manhattan West

Manhattan West — image via Brookfield

Additional renderings depict the base of the office towers, as well as the rooftop of the site’s hotel component, which had previously gone unseen. While the actual hotel is still invisible, the glimpse of the outdoor space is promising, even though it looks to be a mid-rise building.

Manhattan West

Manhattan West — the hotel rooftop, image via Brookfield

While the site’s new buildings will be the most important aspect of the development, the transformation of 450 West 33rd Street will also be significant, as the building occupies a crucial intersection between Manhattan West and Related’s Hudson Yards. Demolishing the structure — or turning it into the base of a mega-tower — would probably be better options, but the planned re-clad will give the structure some element of pedestrian-friendliness, as the street-level will open up to retail.

Manhattan West

The renovated 450 West 33rd Street, image via Brookfield

Construction on the decking that will cover the open pit currently on-site is underway, though no completion date for the overall plan has been announced.

Subscribe to the YIMBY newsletter for weekly updates on New York’s top projects
Follow the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

For any questions, comments, or feedback, email newyorkyimby@gmail.com

Posted in Architecture | Brookfield | Manhattan West | Midtown | Midtown West | New York | Office | Renderings | Residential | SOM

YIMBY News

You have been reading YIMBY for 60 seconds.

That’s the time it takes to read our Saturday newsletter, which summarizes the week’s TOP 5 stories.