Long Island City

YIMBY suggestion for Queens Plaza-Queensboro Plaza connector via the proposed complex at 28-07 Jackson Avenue in Long Island City. Photos by the author unless indicated otherwise.

Tishman Speyer and H&R REIT Have Chance To Link Two Key Long Island City Subway Stations

Six of the seven subway lines that connect Queens to Manhattan converge at the foot of the Queensboro Bridge, where Queens Plaza meets Queens Boulevard, Northern Boulevard, and Jackson Avenue. There, the elevated Queensboro Plaza station handles the N, Q, and 7 trains, while the E, M, and R serve the underground Queens Plaza stop. The two stations face increasing pressure from steady growth in both Long Island City and the borough as a whole, as well as the impending overflow of Brooklyn commuters displaced by the L train shutdown. The need for a transfer connection between them has become more pressing than ever.

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11-51 47th Avenue

The Jackson at 11-51 47th Avenue Rises Ten Floors, With One More To Go

In YIMBY’s recent rundown of Long Island City development, we tallied seventeen structures of eight stories and above that have topped-out in the Court Square area within the past twelve months. It appears that The Jackson, which is taking shape at 11-51 47th Avenue, will be the next to join the list. The structure doubled in size between August 15th and the start of October, growing from five to ten floors, so we expect to see the remaining penthouse floor and the service bulkhead rise in the coming weeks. The 53-unit condo project is being developed by Charney Construction and Development, in conjunction with Ascent Development and Tavros Capital, while the industrial-inspired design was crafted by Chris Fogarty of Fogarty Finger.

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Long Island City skyline in 2016, with its expected 2020 silhouette overlaid on top. Photos and graphics by the author unless indicated otherwise.

Long Island City Rises: Tracking 2016 Skyline Progress and Looking Ahead

Last September, we gave our readers a definitive introduction to the city’s latest urban core, which was then just beginning its skyward ascent. Over the past year, we released dozens of updates regarding the myriad of projects coming to Long Island City, particularly those rising along the streets of the Court Square district. Today YIMBY revisits the growing community, looking at the progress that has been made over the past year, as well as what lies in store in the near future.

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Steel Haus foundations at 41-32 27th Street. Looking west. Photos by the author.

15-Story Steel Haus at 41-32 27th Street, Long Island City, Reaches Ground Level

The future 15-story residential building at 41-32 27th Street, called Steel Haus, has reached street level. The narrow building will sit upon an irregularly shaped plot on the northern fringe of the booming Court Square district, north of Queens Plaza. The 46-unit project, developed by the Hakimian Organization, will join a dense block of residential and office mid- and high-rises that have replaced a district of crumbling commercial properties over the past ten years. ESM Construction Corp serves as the general contractor.

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Luna LIC at 42-15 Crescent Street, Long Island City. Photos by the author unless noted otherwise.

A Detailed Look at the Recently Completed Luna LIC, Office-to-Residential Conversion at 42-15 Crescent Street, Long Island City

Office-to-residential conversions are usually expected of ornate, pre-war high-rises, or tall-ceiling industrial lofts. Such conversions are much more rare at mid-century office buildings, particularly ones that had no redeeming architectural value in the first place. Long Island City’s Luna LIC became one of the city’s only such projects when it opened its doors earlier this year. The nine-story office building was built in 1955 at 42-15 Crescent Street, at the foot of the Queensboro Bridge. Over the past few years, Meadow Partners redeveloped the property into an 11-story, 124-unit rental, and sold it to World Wide Group for a hefty profit. The architects at Avinash K. Malhotra Architects, also known as AKM Architects, opted for minimal intervention, rather than a total structural overhaul, which was sufficient to transform the poorly-aged eyesore into the latest addition to the growing residential community around Court Square.

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