Revealed: Vernon Tower, 31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

The first permits are up for a new building at 31-43 Vernon Boulevard in Queens, which straddles the border between Astoria and Long Island City. The site has been dubbed ‘Vernon Tower’ by PACS Architecture, which is the firm designing the project, and the site’s developer is Michael Heletz of Vernon Tower LLC.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

31-43 Vernon Boulevard is located directly off of Astoria’s Socrates Sculpture Park, and the development will have unobstructed views of the Manhattan skyline; while the location may be less than prime, the vicinity is quickly becoming a hot-spot for construction. At the very least, the views offered from Vernon Tower will be comprehensive and permanent.

Aesthetically, 31-43 Vernon Boulevard falls into the ‘average’ category. The building’s facade will be simple, and its form will enhance a street-scape that was formerly barren; the development’s positive impact on the surrounding neighborhood is more important than its looks, and it will be a net-benefit for Astoria.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, image from PACS Architecture

The DOB filings indicate the development will span 66,300 square feet in total, with 1,409 square feet to be dedicated to ground-floor retail. The remainder of the building will be residential, with 79 units spanning Vernon Tower’s six floors; the project will stand 61 feet tall. PACS’ page on the site has conflicting information on the number of apartments, noting the development will have 105 units.

31-43 Vernon Boulevard

31-43 Vernon Boulevard, via Google Maps

Construction is set to begin on 31-43 Vernon Boulevard this spring, though no completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 31-43 Vernon Boulevard | Architecture | Astoria | New York | PACS Architecture | Queens | Renderings | Residential | Vernon Tower

Revealed: 27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue

The first renderings are up for a new project at 27-07 43rd Avenue, in Long Island City’s Court Square neighborhood; the mixed-use building is being developed by LIC Place LLC — with Amir Hagani the name attached to the corporation — and Gene Kaufman is the architect of record.

27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue, equipment on-site

The on-site image is black, white, and not exactly all-encompassing, but the rendered design looks significantly more promising than Kaufman’s typical work in Manhattan. 27-07 43rd Avenue’s form is going to be straight-forward and basic — two qualities Kaufman definitely excels at — and as long as the facade isn’t garish, the final product may actually result in a positive contribution to the surrounding neighborhood.

Permits indicate the development will span 57,173 square feet, with ground floor retail to be topped by 50 residences. Floors two through nine will have six apartments each, while the penthouse level will have two units, as well as a rooftop terrace.

27-07 43rd Avenue

27-07 43rd Avenue, equipment on-site

27-07 43rd Avenue’s surrounds are currently booming; the number of projects rising in adjacent blocks is verging on prolific, and includes 42-12 28th Street, 41-21 24th Street, and 41-42 24th Street, to name a few. Court Square is quickly coalescing into a coherent neighborhood, and the surge of new residential development will transform the currently desolate street-scape into something vibrant, walkable, and attractive.

27-07 43rd Avenue

Project Description

Completion of 27-07 43rd Avenue is expected in the spring of 2016.

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Posted in 27-07 43rd Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Court Square | Kaufman | Long Island City | New York | Residential

Revealed: Packard Square West

41-21 24th Street, Packard Square West -- rendering

The first renderings are up for a new residential project dubbed Packard Square West, located at 41-21 24th Street in Long Island City. The site’s developer is Joseph Ciampa, and the architect of record is Fakler, Eliason, & Porcelli AIA; neither of the aforementioned have functioning websites.

41-21 24th Street’s aesthetics look to be characterized by the color red, and not much else. The posted design isn’t exactly detailed, but the building will likely be rentals, distinguished by a bright-brick facade and exposed floor-plates. While not all rentals are stunning, the rendered appearance of Packard Square West leaves much to be desired.

41-21 24th Street, Packard Square West

41-21 24th Street, Packard Square West — excavation beginning

Permits for Packard Square West indicate that the development will measure 64,219 square feet, with all of the space devoted to residential use. The building will stand eleven stories tall, rising 100 feet above street level; the project will have 88 units in total.

In terms of location, the development is situated in a booming neighborhood, as construction is accelerating throughout Court Square; across the street, Perkins Eastman designed a 421-unit tower that is also rising.

Perkins Eastman’s plan for 41-42 24th Street proves that rental developments in the neighborhood — while not necessarily ‘wow’-worthy — can still be attractive additions to the cityscape. Luckily, the height of 41-21 24th Street should limit its visual impact on Court Square, and its RedRum-inspired appearance will be invisible from most perspectives.

41-21 24th Street, Packard Square West

41-21 24th Street, Packard Square West — on-site signage

Excavation on Packard Square West is well underway, and per on-site signage, completion is slated for the fall of 2015.

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Posted in 41-21 24th Street | Architecture | Court Square | Joseph Ciampa | Long Island City | New York | Packard Square West | Queens | Renderings | Residential

Revealed: 42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street

The first renderings for 42-12 28th Street have been posted on-site; developer Heatherwood Communities is building the 58-story skyscraper, which will become the tallest residential tower in Brooklyn and Queens. The site is located in Long Island City’s Court Square neighborhood, and the architect of record is Goldstein, Hill, & West.

42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street

Going above what is typically posted to the sides of construction fences, the series of four images reveal the tower within its future surroundings; the aesthetic is simple and glassy, typical of new developments in Long Island City, though zig-zagging lines of a white material break up the facade’s monotony.

Above anything else, 42-12 28th Street’s defining characteristic will be its height, which will distinguish the structure from neighboring high-rises; rising 646 feet, it will stand only twelve feet shy of the soon-to-be un-monolithic One Court Square.

42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street

In terms of size, 42-12 28th Street will have 392,824 square feet of residential space — split between 477 units — and 5,878 square feet dedicated to retail. Zoning documents have additional information, covered previously on YIMBY.

42-12 28th Street

Aerial rendering

Completion of 42-12 28th Street is expected in June of 2017.

42-12 28th Street

Base of the project

42-12 28th Street

Excavation beginning

 

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Posted in 42-12 28th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | New York | Renderings | Residential

Interview with the Developer: Sam Charney

Developer Sam Charney

YIMBY sat down with developer Sam Charney, who recently departed from Two Trees to pursue his own slate of projects in Long Island City, heading Charney Construction and Development. Drawing from his positive working relationship with David and Jed Walentas, Charney’s own ambitions include a new 70,000 square foot project near MoMA’s PS1, with plans for two additional condo buildings on the near horizon.

YIMBY in bold.

I would imagine developing a project on your own has its positives and negatives, but the scope is smaller than what you typically worked on at Two Trees; what are some of the biggest changes you’ve dealt with since striking out on your own?

That’s correct;  my typical projects at Two Trees were over 100,000 square feet square feet and averaged over one hundred units. My current project at 11-51 47th Avenue in Long Island City is 70,000 square feet with 54 condominiums, ground-floor retail, and 21 parking spaces. There are definitely positives and negatives about being out on my own, but one of the greatest advantages so far has been working with my partner Ascent Development — the principals and I did our Master’s at NYU together so we’ve already been friends for ten years. There have certainly been some trying times taking a friendship to the business partner level, but I have always been a big believer in a ‘think tank’ atmosphere, and as long as we maintain a mutual respect for each other, I think we will always end up with the most productive outcome.

The major disadvantage thus far has been not having the amazing support staff I had at Two Trees. I was able to cultivate an extremely talented team of individuals over the last five years, and they were invaluable in making our projects the tremendous successes that they were.

11-51 47th Street

11-51 47th Avenue — image from Fogarty Finger

How will the building take the context of Jackson Avenue & Long Island City into account? PS1 is right around the corner, correct?

Yes, PS1 / MOMA is our neighbor and with arguably the most recognizable architectural icon in Long Island City right next door, we felt a real responsibility to create something special that will expand upon what is an already architecturally significant corridor. It takes a lot of thought to create something that is both aesthetically fresh and interesting while at the same time being reverent to our handsome and historic neighbor. I think our architect has done a wonderful job of creating a design that recalls the industrial past of the neighborhood while modernizing that aesthetic. The fact that we are a corner lot with frontage on three streets presents this very special opportunity to create an architecturally noteworthy building to compliment PS1, and hopefully become its own icon on the Jackson Avenue corridor for years to come.

Aesthetically, what are some of the project’s defining features — and what sets it apart from competing developments in the neighborhood? Who is the architect?

Our architect is Fogarty Finger. The design partner we are working with, Chris Fogarty, has done a phenomenal job of articulating what we believe is the aesthetic people are looking for in today’s built world; the plan for 11-51 47th Avenue uses exposed raw materials and elements such as concrete, steel, and wood to evoke the industrial past of Long Island City, while also incorporating rounded glass walls and multi-paned windows to modernize the scheme. When Chris and I first sat down to discuss the project, he explained to me that if you asked today’s younger generation what their ideal apartment would look it, it would probably resemble a loft in Tribeca, Soho or the Meat Packing District; to that effect, the project will also have higher end appliances, fixtures and finishes than anything currently on the market in Long Island City.

After witnessing and playing a role in the Brooklyn Avenue boom under David and Jed Walentas over the past decade, I have learned that by building a quality product with finer finishes than your competitors you always ensure that your product stands out. It’s the reason my past two rentals, 25 and 30 Washington Street, achieved the highest rents per square foot in all of DUMBO, surpassing $70/PSF.

Who is the target audience of the LIC project? It seems like more families are moving to the neighborhood; do the apartments cater to that demographic?

Yes. Our project is 25% one-bedrooms, 50% two-bedrooms, and 25% three-bedrooms. With 75% of our apartments being family-sized residences, we are definitely catering to the emerging ‘young family’ demographic in Long Island City. In the past, the neighborhood was viewed as a cheaper alternative to Manhattan for the young professionals who worked in midtown. Now, all of those young professionals have fallen in love with the neighborhood. They prefer the relative calm of the waterfront, the parks and open spaces, and the exceptional train access. Now that this same demographic is in their late twenties and early thirties, they are having children and thinking about transitioning from rental stock into home ownership and growing their equity. Simultaneously, the retailers have taken notice and have begun to emerge and cater to this demographic. The ‘locavore’ and artisanal restaurants and shops that have become synonymous with the Brooklyn brand have begun to move in in full force. The energy and excitement is evocative of what we saw in Williamsburg over the past ten years and it’s electrifying to be playing a small part in it once again.

What are your thoughts on the City Planning fiasco at your alma mater’s project in Williamsburg; have you had to deal with anything similar at your LIC development?

Thankfully I haven’t. Our project is as-of-right so we don’t need any special permits or approvals from the city. I think in regards to the Domino Sugar Project, the city had every right to ask for things that they believe will improve the quality of the built world for its residents; the job of politicians should be to improve the lives of their constituency. That being said, this was a tricky negotiation because Two Trees held an as-of-right plan that the previous developer, CPC, had already gotten approved by City Planning. I think David and Jed did a wonderful job of creating a much smarter and more thoughtful plan for the site which re-connected street grids, created more public parkland, and had an overall greater architectural interest and integrity. It was admirable that they took the risk of going back through ULURP to create something they believed would benefit not only them, but the surrounding neighborhood. In the end, I think it was a very successful negotiation; both parties walked away a little unsatisfied, but I am very happy that the scheme that will most benefit New Yorkers ended up prevailing.

Domino Redevelopment

Domino Redevelopment — image from SHoP

Where do you see Court Square/LIC heading in five years? Do you see the increase in supply as sufficient to meet demand, or is the neighborhood’s popularity surging quickly enough that it will see sustained increases in pricing?

I think what’s happening in Western Queens right now is really special. Having spent my last ten or so years in Brooklyn, what I witnessed in regards to taste changing and people actually starting to prefer the borough over Manhattan was historically significant. I think now that Brooklyn is a preference, and prices reflect that, people are looking elsewhere. With land prices trading for roughly half of Williamsburg, and better transportation options, people are realizing the potential of the sleeping giant that is Long Island City. There is nowhere near enough condo stock in the neighborhood to meet demand, but I think developers are picking up on that, which is what’s driving land prices up. We certainly have picked up on it and it’s why we are in contract for two additional condo development sites at the moment.

Everyday I’m out in Long Island City, I’m surprised by yet another innovative restaurant, bar or gallery opening on some side street. Additionally, since Queens is the most diverse of all the boroughs – if not the most diverse place in the United States — some really interesting culinary options are popping up and will continue to do so as restaurants in the more historically ethnic parts of the borough such as Flushing and Jackson Heights open outposts in LIC. I think in five years, Vernon Boulevard and Jackson Avenue will have culinary scenes that rival those of Bedford Avenue in Williamsburg and Smith Street in Cobble Hill/Carroll Gardens.

Between the LIC waterfront and Court Square, which neighborhood do you think has the most potential?

I think the area with the most potential is what I’d call Hunter’s Point East. The large rental towers on the water were the pioneers and created the required density that the retailers need. Vernon Boulevard is rapidly becoming a really exciting retail strip — in fact, I was talking with a broker earlier today who said it reminded her of San Francisco, because of the low-rise scale, and all the mom & pop stores and restaurants. I think that from Vernon to Jackson there are many pockets that will infill by 2020. Interestingly, Jackson runs from Hunter’s Point to Court Square — so as construction heats up in Court Square, the development pressure will come from both sides. This will result in Jackson becoming another major retail boulevard like Vernon. In this sense both sub-districts will help one another synthesize a powerhouse neighborhood, full of creative young professionals.

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Posted in 11-51 47th Street | Architecture | Charney Construction and Development | Court Square | Long Island City | New York | Renderings | Residential | Sam Charney | Two Trees

Permits Filed: 44-41 Purves Street

44-41 Purves on-site rendering; image from The Court Square Blog

A series of new permits have been filed for 44-41 Purves Street in Long Island City, which Curbed first reported on back in September of 2012; plans have evidently seen major alterations, and the latest filings with the DOB indicate an increase in the number of planned units. While The Criterion Group was previously listed as the developer, the lot changed hands, and Simon Dushinksy’s Rabsky Group is now heading the site’s construction.

The Court Square Blog posted on-site renderings last month, and the latest permits seem to corroborate the depicted design, though the details behind the project have seen changes. What was initially expected to be a development with multiple components has been consolidated, and 44-41 Purves Street will now stand 25 stories tall, with its 207,595 square feet split between 284 units; the building will be entirely residential.

44-41 Purves

44-41 Purves zoning diagram, image via the DOB

Zoning diagrams reveal the latest changes, which are corroborated by the latest work approval application; the documents were filed with the DOB at the end of March.

44-41 Purves

44-41 Purves site diagram, via the DOB

Given the similarities between the drawings within the zoning diagrams and the on-site renderings, it would seem that the design covered by The Court Square Blog simply lacked the relevant permits at the time it was put up; luckily, the DOB filings now seem to have caught up with what’s apparent on the ground. While the general Court Square vicinity is in the midst of a development boom, Purves Street in particular is seeing a significant amount of activity, and according to The Real Deal, another project is planned across the street.

44-41 Purves

44-41 Purves under construction; image from The Court Square Blog

Completion of 44-41 Purves Street — which also goes by its alternate address of 44-35 Purves Street — is expected in the winter of 2017.

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Posted in 44-35 Purves Street | 44-41 Purves Street | Construction Update | Court Square | Long Island City | New York | Queens | Rabsky Group | Residential | Simon Dushinksy

Revealed: 29-26 Northern Boulevard

29-26 Northern Boulevard, image via the SBJ Group

The slew of renderings from the Stephens B. Jacobs Group continues; the firm has released another set of images for a new tower that will soon rise at 29-26 Northern Boulevard, in Long Island City. The Real Deal reported on the site’s acquisition by Simon Baron Development last month, and the lot was bought from the Rabsky Group for $54 million.

YIMBY covered the initial permits last November; the plans were disapproved in January. The DOB documents list the SBJ Group as the architect of record, and per The Real Deal, Simon Baron Development will continue with SBJ’s initial plans.

29-26 Northern Boulevard

29-26 Northern Boulevard, image via the SBJ Group

Per the DOB filings, 29-26 Northern Boulevard will total 382,120 square feet. 13,579 square feet will be dedicated to ground-floor retail, while the remainder will be divided between 415 apartments. The building will stand 45 stories and 473 feet tall, making it one of the most prominent towers in the Court Square vicinity.

SBJ’s website indicates that 29-26 Northern Boulevard — which is a mouthful — has been dubbed ‘QE7′ by the developer, which is apparently a take on the design concept and the building’s location, which is near the Q, E, and 7 trains. Specifically, SBJ describes the project as an “urban vertical cruise ship,” with amenities that will include “a two-story fitness center on the 2nd and 4th floors with lounge, gym, spa, climbing wall, pool, and [an] outdoor 5v5 soccer pitch,” in addition to “a covered outdoor half-court basketball court [...] and a rooftop bar and lounge.”

29-26 Northern Boulevard

29-26 Northern Boulevard, image via the SBJ Group

While the laundry list of facilities seems to be comparable to the floating Queen Elizabeth, the location — adjacent to elevated train tracks — is a substantial departure from the high seas. Still, the development will be a positive addition to Court Square, and the vicinity surrounding the Dutch Kills park is seeing a mini-boom in its own right, with several projects rising in the adjacent blocks.

29-32 Northern Boulevard

29-32 Northern Boulevard, the remaining building on the QE7 site

No completion date for 29-26 Northern Boulevard has been announced.

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Posted in 29-26 Northern Boulevard | 29-32 Northern Boulevard | Architecture | Long Island City | New York | Queens | Renderings | Residential | SBJ Group | Simon Baron Development

Interview: Market Trends with Douglas Elliman’s Clifford Finn

Go East! Long Island City and Brooklyn are booming.

YIMBY sat down with Clifford Finn, Executive Vice President of Douglas Elliman’s new development marketing team, to discuss his thoughts regarding what’s up and coming in New York City, the latest happenings in NoMAD, and the continued ramifications of Hurricane Sandy. YIMBY in bold.

Have you heard anything about Journal Square, and do you see it becoming more like Downtown Jersey City or Long Island City? How quickly is it going to develop?

It’s interesting. You know, in the past, Jersey City was more of a suburban mentality; that goes for the people building there, and the audience that was going there. Although many Manhattanites found their way there, a wide audience was filling those buildings; it was a little bit different than crossing the other rivers. But that’s changing, because now everybody is looking there due to the increase in land costs. Brooklyn is not a huge discount to Manhattan anymore, and Long Island City is not far behind it; everybody is looking for the next great, convenient, commutable destination, and they are setting their sights back on Jersey City and the surrounding area.

Journal Squared

Journal Squared – image via Handel Architects

Moving back to Manhattan, YIMBY attended 1182 Broadway’s opening, which is a converted building in NoMAD; what are some features that make conversions in NoMAD stand apart from new developments in the neighborhood, and what’s special about The Centurian?

In the past, conversions of this type were typically larger buildings that go condo — like 10 Madison Square West. But for rent, you either had the Sixth Avenue high-rises and the few hot buildings off that corridor, or much older conversion stock that doesn’t have the luxury standard of today’s market. And I think what sets The Centurian apart from the rest is that it’s rental, but was built with a condominium sensibility and comparable finishes.

The Centurian

The Centurian — image from the Museum of the City of New York

It seems geared towards wealthy bachelors in technology.

Well, some units were; on the typical floor-plates before you get to the upper, larger apartments, we have two loft-style layouts that don’t have a formal bedroom. And then we have two [layouts] that have formal bedrooms, and they’re all similar in size. So I think it’s not just about singles; definitely couples too, and more established people. In that neighborhood, we’re seeing a cross-section of different types of people; it really speaks to a lot of audiences.

And do you think the broad appeal of NoMAD heralds its emergence as one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city?

I think that it’s one of them, because there’s a lot of similarities between NoMAD and neighborhoods like SoHo and Tribeca — but you have a park, and you’re more centrally located. It’s convenient to Midtown, Uptown, and Downtown, and it’s a great spot if you have to get out of the city quickly because it’s so close to the bridges and tunnels. You’re a little bit more centrally located, but you still have the flavor and feel that you’re not in Midtown.

1165 Broadway

A new building set for 1165 Broadway — image from Spector Group

Where would you say the neighborhood’s boundaries are? Because it’s still emerging.

Madison Square Park ends at 26th Street, so up to about 30th. I think once you cross 30th it gets much more Midtown-like. And then down to 23rd Street; below 23rd people consider it to be Flatiron. And it extends between Broadway and Park Avenue.

Sandy devastated sections of the city; do you see prices being affected in areas like the West Village and the Seaport, if measures to mitigate future events are not taken? If there is another event, do you think the double-whammy could result in a sustained drop in prices?

Not in the immediate future, I mean I myself live in a Zone 1 neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, and it didn’t affect the market for those neighborhoods at all.

But if there was another one?

I think it depends on if they get worse. I think that everybody feels like what happened was very inconvenient, but there was nothing truly devastating. I think the Seaport was much more affected, and that neighborhood is a little more sensitive to future impacts than the West Side. We have a lot of projects that are in flood zones, and plans have remained the same, it’s just that some components have been elevated. And that’s the way things need to be moving forward; you have to build for the tide to go through the property, and not disrupt the tower. We have to build to accommodate; I don’t think people are scared as long as they know that the issues are being addressed.

What about insurance companies?

It’s hard; again, I’m in a Zone 1 building, and our insurance premiums doubled. And that’s unfortunate, but if you have a house on the ocean, it’s a risk you take to be on the ocean. And it’s the same with living in these prime neighborhoods.

As prices in Manhattan rise, Brooklyn and Queens are becoming go-to destinations for luxury real estate. What do you see in the future for Downtown Brooklyn and Long Island City; will the impending development boom keep prices steady, given the amount of supply that will soon be coming online?

No, prices are climbing, and I think they’ll continue to rise. Everything that we’ve been touching has been climbing, and I believe that the bulk of the rental marketplace out there is really what isn’t being built in Manhattan, so it’s not like it’s in addition to anything going up in Manhattan — so there isn’t an abundance of new product. Those price-points won’t exist in brand-new developments on the island, so people have to go to Queens and Brooklyn for these buildings, and I don’t see supply hitting demand — at least in any of the studies we’ve looked at. And the discount, even with future conservative growth, is respectable.

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

CityPoint phase I and 388 Bridge Street

What about Harlem? It seems like people neglect it even though prices there are also increasing.

I think people focus on where the obvious discounts are, and when those go away, they set their sites on the next ones. It’s like Bushwick; is that the next one? No, now it’s Bensonhurst. It keeps moving farther out, and farther up; everything is cyclical. I think people were hot on Harlem a few years ago; people caught on, then the obvious discounts were gone, so the momentum shifted elsewhere. But now everything has elevated, and they are re-visiting Harlem, because what might have not seemed like a discount previously is now well-priced. I think we’re going to see a lot of movement in East Harlem in particular.

But what about all the public housing? Don’t you think that will prevent revitalization?

Yes and no. Anything that’s a destination — a building’s presence will overshadow that. I think people in New York City are accustomed to public housing being all around them. If you look at the West Side, you have the Amsterdam Houses by Lincoln Center; twenty or thirty years ago, you would never walk around back there. But now, it is completely surrounded on all four sides with extremely expensive luxury housing, and neighborhoods that didn’t exist back then. I think people are accepting, and if it’s a neighborhood on the verge, people are likely to take the discount. You don’t have to twist anybody’s arm to buy near the Amsterdam Houses today.

So, finally: If you could pick the top three neighborhoods to invest in today, which would they be?

I think one of the best — and I’m not just saying this because we have a building going up there — but I think Inwood is one of the very few sleeper neighborhoods still around, and I really like it. I still think, for different reasons, that FiDi is still comparatively undervalued. You’re starting to see the trickle-down effect from the Village and SoHo, as it heads Downtown. With North FiDi, especially; all those buildings on the border of Tribeca.

Like 56 Leonard?

Yes, 56 Leonard, 101 Leonard; they’re on Broadway, or Worth, or Leonard. They’re at the cross-roads of entering the Financial District, and we’re seeing those numbers shoot up. And as we see businesses populating the World Trade Center — plus the Fulton Center and the new malls — basically they’re going through the process of building an infrastructure that never existed Downtown, so that it can compete with other residential neighborhoods. It always catered to the business community, and I think the FiDi has been around for long enough as a residential destination that we’re just now seeing the makings of a true residential area in terms of amenities. So I like it for those reasons; it still has a lot of room to grow.

It would be difficult to pinpoint a neighborhood in Brooklyn, but I love Gowanus; I think it’s like a case-study.

56 Leonard

56 Leonard

Have you been there?

Yes, we’re working on projects there. The thing about Gowanus is that it’s the epicenter of many other neighborhoods. It’s between Carroll Gardens and Park Slope, which are two fabulous neighborhoods.

Isn’t it centered on a toxic canal?

For many years the canal was toxic and polluted, and not very attractive –

So it’s basically like Greenpoint-lite.

Yes, but that’s changing; it’s being cleaned-up and redeveloped. There is a population of young artists and creative types that have been living in that area, and it’s been one of those sleeper neighborhoods for a long time. And as pricing continues to escalate in adjacent established neighborhoods, Gowanus is on the verge of major change.

And why has it remained so undervalued; the pollution?

Well because it had a very old stigma attached to it because of the canal, so people stayed away. But at this point we’re out of land, and it’s there, and it is a very good location — and the pollution is being addressed, and re-mediation has been ongoing for years, though it has not been obvious to people. But it’s really on the way. And Whole Foods is opening a Gowanus location, and I think that says a lot.

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Posted in 1182 Broadway | Clifford Finn | DoBro | Douglas Elliman | Downtown | FiDi | Gowanus | Jersey City | Journal Square | Long Island City | Midtown | New York | Residential | The Centurian

Construction Update: 42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street, image by Matthew Weiler

Excavation is now underway at 42-12 28th Street in Long Island City, which will soon become the tallest residential building in Queens. The project’s architect is Goldstein, Hill & West, and the site’s developer is Heatherwood.

While permits indicate 42-12 28th Street will eventually stand 58 stories and 596 feet, they do not account for the bulkhead levels atop the building; the zoning diagrams reveal that 42-12 28th Street will actually rise 646 feet and 8 inches to its pinnacle, making it significantly taller than any existing residential high-rises in Long Island City. Indeed, at 646 feet, the skyscraper will become the tallest apartment building in either Brooklyn or Queens, and will stand a mere twelve feet shorter than One Court Square, which has dominated the Court Square skyline all by its lonesome self for over two decades.

42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street, zoning diagram via the DOB

With 477 units, 42-12 28th Street will also add a significant number of new residents to the burgeoning Court Square neighborhood, which is seeing a surge in development. In terms of square footage, the building will have 5,878 square feet of retail, and 392,824 square feet of residential space.

Next-door, Heatherwood recently completed 42-17 27th Street — aka 27 on 27th, via Curbed — which has 142 units. Rockrose is another major participant in the area’s renaissance, and The Linc LIC — a 790-unit tower which was recently completed — will soon be joined by another skyscraper, at 10 Court Square.

Height-wise, 10 Court Square will still play second-fiddle to 42-12 28th Street, as the former will only stand 50 stories and 509 feet. The race upwards is just beginning in Long Island City, and the momentum in Court Square is going to become readily apparent as the skyline will be completely transformed over the course of the next decade.

42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street, viewed from 28th Street, image by Matthew Weiler

Given its scope and height, 42-12 28th Street will make a significant positive impact on the neighborhood’s street-scape and its skyline, helping the push towards the creation of an urban, livable, and walkable node in Court Square. While no completion date has been announced, permits were partially approved on March 4th, and construction is clearly underway.

42-12 28th Street

42-12 28th Street, image by Matthew Weiler

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Posted in 42-12 28th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Court Square | Goldstein Hill West | Heatherwood Communities | New York | Residential

Revealed: 41-42 24th Street

41-42 24th Street -- image via Alexander Briseno

Renderings are up for 41-42 24th Street, which will bring 421 units to a slice of Long Island City that remains desolate. YIMBY previously reported on the site’s permits — which were approved back in November — and the architect of record is Perkins Eastman, while the developer is the Worldwide Group. Graphic artist Alexander Briseno posted the images to Behance.

41-42 24th Street

41-42 24th Street — image via Alexander Briseno

Long Island City’s boom is rapidly accelerating; while TF Cornerstone’s East Coast LIC development has been leading the way in terms of new construction, the focal point of activity is pivoting back to Court Square. Considering the rapid progress at Hunter’s Point South, the waterfront is quickly approaching full build-out, so the shift makes sense.

41-42 24th Street

41-42 24th Street — image via Alexander Briseno

41-42 24th Street will have a significant positive impact on the surrounding neighborhood; its mass and bulk will add to the area’s pedestrian appeal, and the inclusion of ground-floor commercial space will further enhance walkability. Aesthetically, the project will create a street-wall where none existed before; the structure’s chief contribution will be additional density.

41-42 24th Street

41-42 24th Street — image via Alexander Briseno

Permits indicate that 41-42 24th Street will have total approximately 319,000 square feet, and  8,707 square feet will be dedicated to the commercial component.

41-42 24th Street

41-42 24th Street — image via Alexander Briseno

Construction firm Lettire’s website has additional information on 41-42 24th Street, and its planned completion date is 2015.

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Posted in 41-42 24th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Long Island City | New York | Perkins Eastman | Residential | World-Wide Group

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