Tribeca

388-390 Greenwich Street

Citigroup In Contract To Acquire Their 39-Story, 2.7-Million Square-Foot Headquarters At 388-390 Greenwich Street, TriBeCa

In early 2015, renderings were revealed of the planned renovations at Citigroup’s headquarters at 388-390 Greenwich Street, in TriBeCa, and now the company is in contract to acquire the the 39-story, 2.7-million square-foot office complex. According to Real Estate Weekly, Citigroup will purchase the properties from SL Green Realty Corp. for $2 billion. The renovations include connecting the tower portion at 388 Greenwich to the 10-story structure at 390 Greenwich. The transformation will include a new façade on large portions of the existing buildings, a single lobby that serves both sections, plaza renovations, a rooftop terrace, and amenities like a fitness center. The sale is expected to close in December of 2017 and renovations should be complete by 2019.



11 Hubert Street

Plans For Five-Story, 20,000 Square-Foot Mansion Revealed At 11 Hubert Street, TriBeCa

Maya Lin Studio and Bialosky + Partners Architects are designing a five-story, 20,000 square-foot mansion at 11 Hubert Street, in TriBeCa, TribecaTrib reports. The building would be clad in metal, glass, and limestone, and features five bedrooms with typical residential accessories, a landscaped courtyard, and a 5,000 square-foot fitness center. The family for which the home would be built remains anonymous, but $15 to $16 million would be spent to develop the property. The site is located within the North Tribeca Historic District, so the Landmarks Preservation Commission would have to approve the plans. The existing three-story mixed-use structure would not be demolished, rather expanded and built upon.

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70 Vestry Street

Updated Look At 14-Story, 46-Unit Residential Project At 70 Vestry Street, TriBeCa

Last summer, YIMBY revealed the first rendering of Related Companies’ planned 14-story, 46-unit residential project at 70 Vestry Street, in TriBeCa. Changes have since been made to the design, and Curbed NY was the first to publish an updated image of part of the exterior, which will be clad in French limestone. Robert A.M. Stern Architects is designing, with Ismael Leyva Architects serving as the architect of record, and Daniel Romualdez responsible for the interiors. Last September, the developer secured $200 million in construction loans, and completion of the 154,019 square-foot project is expected in early 2018.


Historical image of 346 Broadway

Loan Secured For 13-Story, 151-Unit Condo Conversion At 346 Broadway, TriBeCa

YIMBY detailed in November of 2014 the initial Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) hearing on the residential conversion of the former New York Life Insurance Company building at 346 Broadway (a.k.a. 108 Leonard Street), in Tribeca. The 13-story, 427,000 square-foot building is an individual and interior landmark, and is listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. A month after the hearing, the LPC approved the changes that would including making the structure’s clock tower part of a penthouse and for the clock to run electronically, the WSJ reported. Last week, according to Commercial Observer, the Peebles Organization and Elad Group landed a $334 million construction loan for the project, which would convert the former office building into 151 condominium units. Additionally, a community facility and retail space will measure 7,210 and 2,200 square feet, respectively. Beyer Blinder Belle is designing the conversion.


A selection of demolitions from 2015. Photos by Vitali Ogorodnikov unless otherwise noted.

What Notable NYC Buildings Were Demolished in 2015?

In 2015, New York’s landmarks law turned 50 years old. Events and discussion panels were held across the city throughout the year. The Museum of the City of New York held the commemorative Saving Place exhibit. As YIMBY reported, six individual landmarks and four historic districts were designated during this period. However, last year also saw its fair share of demolitions. Here, we look back at a small selection from the dozens of buildings that met the wrecking ball over the course of 2015. These eight structures range from architectural masterpieces to eyesores and span across a variety of decades, styles, and uses – as diverse as the Big Apple’s built environment itself.

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