Revealed: 6 Water Street

6 Water Street

On-site renderings are up for yet another Kaufman-designed hotel, this one coming to 6 Water Street, in the Financial District. Permits, which were issued on July 1st, indicate the developer is Sam Chang.

6 Water Street will stand 29 stories tall, and will have 249 rooms; the scope will total 125,684 square feet, which is about average for new hotel developments in Manhattan.

6 Water Street

6 Water Street

Kaufman’s latest creation replaces pre-war architecture that was undersized but attractive, and the site’s new occupant presents a marked downgrade for a block that enjoys excellent transit access; 6 Water Street is just a short jaunt from several express trains as well as the Staten Island Ferry, and would make an excellent location for either residential or office development.

6 Water Street

6 Water Street

Unfortunately, New York State imposes a floor-area ratio limit of 10 on residential developments, rising to 12 with an affordable housing bonus. As a result, the developer went for the 50 percent higher FAR allowed for commercial property, likely because the less desirable eastern half of the Financial District couldn’t generate the rents or condo prices to make less dense housing worthwhile.

This disparity between residential and commercial zoning is nonsensical, where FARs of up to 33 are allowed for office plots at Hudson Yards. Neighborhoods in Manhattan with excellent transit should be very dense regardless of use. With a state zoning tweak and a city one to take advantage of it, a more attractive and in demand – not to mention, profitable – residential project would likely have been built on the site.

The density cap is especially absurd given that the Financial District is the one part of the city where residential buildings already exceed the modern density limits, due to office-to-residential conversions. Exceptions to state law were made for this type of redevelopment – nearby 67 Wall Street, for example, is about twice as dense as state law would allow for new apartment buildings – to no ill effect.

Correcting the problem would be a major step forward in solving New York’s housing crisis. And while the de Blasio administration likely doesn’t care about FAR limits for market-rate development, it’s hard to see the state opposing anything the city asks for with regards to density, given the lack of opposing interests upstate.

Per on-site signage, completion of 6 Water Street is expected in the winter of 2015.

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Posted in 6 Water Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Financial District | Hotel | Kaufman | New York | Sam Chang

Changing NYC Workforce Means Changing Office Needs

Related's Hudson Yards towers, image by Related/Oxford and Visualhouse

A slew of super-sized office buildings are set to rise in Manhattan over the next several years, punctuating the city’s skyline with new spires of glass. Towers with over 10 million square feet of class A space – at the World Trade Center, Hudson Yards and Midtown proper – are either under construction or looking for tenants and financing.

With tenants lined up at for the first two office buildings at Hudson Yards and nearly half of the space committed at One and Four World Trade Center, these glittering giants are going for the globe’s elite corporations. Marquee tenants desire marquee buildings. Ten million square feet of Class A office space is set to rise in New York in the next few years, most of it underwritten by billions of dollars of public investments and tax abatements.

But as much as the city’s future competitiveness rests with satisfying the office needs of Fortune 500 companies, it also depends on attracting and nurturing startups in high-growth industries like tech, media, and design. These firms require a different sort of office space, and they’re finding it in less traditional buildings outside of Midtown’s office district.

There is rising concern that the city will not have enough flexible office space that meets the needs of startups, tech firms and creative businesses. City officials hope that it is these types of businesses that will propel the city’s economy through the 21st century, just as finance did during the second half of the twentieth.

These firms tend to shun the corporate Class A tower for more flexible spaces in Class B and Class C buildings. They are seeking space in Chelsea, Midtown South, Downtown, and Brooklyn, most often in pre-war buildings that are often cheaper and better suited to layouts preferred by high-growth industries.

“Tech companies are finding characteristics in pre-war buildings that they’re not finding in new office buildings,” says Vishaan Chakrabarti of SHoP Architects and Columbia University’s Center for Urban Real Estate. He notes that 85 percent of new, young companies are in older, pre-war buildings rather than Class A office towers.

Part of the reason is based on economics, but the preference for pre-war also reflects deeper changes in workplace culture: an aversion of the corporate aesthetic, an emphasis on collaboration, and a blurring of the lines between one’s “work life” and “social life.”

Tech and creative firms value collaboration, something that does not happen in sequestered offices on separate floors. Collaboration takes place in shared spaces, co-working stations, and other spaces intended to maximize “casual collisions of the workforce.” Pre-war buildings provide the opportunity to accommodate these arrangements in a way that is often difficult or impossible in corporate towers.

The preference for more collaborative spaces reflects foundational and long-lasting changes in the way people delineate their work lives from their social lives. It also reflects how the boundaries of the “workspace” have expanded to include our homes, our commutes, the café, and the park. It is no longer necessary to stay at one’s desk in order to work.

The workspace is now spilling out of office buildings and into neighboring parks, cafés, and even beer halls. As a result, neighborhoods matter, and young firms want 24-hour neighborhoods where jobs and housing are mixed together with restaurants, bars, and nightlife.

This type of working arrangement started with tech companies, but as Chakrabarti notes, “The reality is that most new young companies are tech companies,” including those in architecture. “I’d consider SHoP a tech company.” The upshot is that these new workplaces will become the new normal.

The move towards shared spaces means that companies need fewer square feet per worker than traditional office layouts. It also means that the single-purpose office district will become increasingly unattractive to newer firms.

 

55 Hudson Yards

55 Hudson Yards, image by Related/Oxford and Visualhouse

Growth in creative and technology firms is outpacing that in finance, and developers of Class A space may be beginning to get the message. As the website for 55 Hudson Yards proclaims, the building will feature “efficient and flexible workspace” for “a work/life integration that enhances employee performance.” 10 Hudson Yards will bridge over the High Line Park with a 60-foot public passageway through the building. One can imagine employees at Coach or L’Oreal bringing their laptops down to the park to collaborate on a new project.

But this space will surely be too expensive for the smaller firms that make up another important pillar of the city’s economy. There is an emerging consensus that the city’s focus must shift to growing the supply of Class B and C office space. The city actually lost 6.2 million square feet of Class B and C space since 2000, even as demand has heated up. The city’s Economic Development Corporation estimates that all the remaining space will be full by 2018. If more space doesn’t become available, the city risks missing out on the next wave of high-growth firms.

Seth Pinsky, former president of the city’s Economic Develoment Corporation and now with RXR Realty, recently said, “There needs to be affordable space for the small companies and start-ups we talk so much about attracting to the city,” noting that up to 15 million square feet of affordable space may be lost in the coming years.

And while some of this growth will happen in Manhattan, policymakers and developers are increasingly focusing on the Brooklyn-Queens waterfront for new job growth. While a developer needs at least $67/square foot to break even on a new development in Midtown South, only $46/square foot is needed in Downtown Brooklyn and Long Island City, according to the EDC.

Domino Redevelopment

Two Trees’ Domino Redevelopment, image by SHoP

Bellwethers include the Watchtower properties, with 1.3 million square feet of space, and the New Domino development’s 500,000 square feet of office space. Smaller conversions like 1000 Dean Street and 29 Ryerson Street, both in Brooklyn, will also be a critical component of any strategy to grow space for startups and creative firms.

The de Blasio administration is also rethinking the role of industrial zones along the Brooklyn-Queens waterfront. Planning commission chair Carl Weisbrod recently talked of industrial zones in Long Island City, musing whether “the city can manufacture space by going vertical for industrial use, allowing businesses to expand.” His idea of vertical manufacturing spaces sounds a bit like the type of space favored by tech and creative startups.

The challenge is that Class B and C office space often doesn’t command the rents necessary to cover the cost of adaptive redevelopment, not to mention new construction. “We get the sense that the marketplace is struggling to build new office space for these newer kinds of companies,” says Chakrabarti.

He suggests that the city step in to provide assistance to property owners in older commercial buildings to upgrade their facilities and broadband access. “There needs to be a new type of building, a ‘Class T’ building that gets away from the A, B, C classification.”

Others warn about losing valuable commercial space to residential use. The EDC predicts that another 12 million square feet of Class B and C space will be lost to residential conversions in the next 12 years. There is also talk that the de Blasio administration is considering whether housing should be allowed in the city’s industrial zones.

Jonathan Bowles of the Center for an Urban Future commented on Long Island City’s industrial zones, “I think that we ought to be looking; should that be preserved, tech companies in the next few years may be able to go there—or creative businesses.”

While the city must ensure that construction, transportation, and warehousing firms have a space in the city, there are definitely places where housing and jobs can coexist. Chakrabarti explains, “This isn’t just about housing, it’s about the ecology of people’s lives. We want to start building these communities where people can walk to work or bike to work.”

This was central to the plan at New Domino, and “At Domino, there’s an intent to build the ecology of an entire neighborhood.” (The fact that local politicians would more readily accept a density boost if it came in the form of office space probably didn’t hurt either.)

The city should also consider the live/work approach when reevaluating its plans for Midtown East. Both commercial and residential space should be included in new buildings, with a higher allowable density to ensure that enough new office space is still built. Conversions should not necessarily be discouraged, as more residents and uses would breathe new life into the neighborhood, with the Financial District offering a prime example of resurgent vitality due to similar conditions.

Housing is also a vital component at Hudson Yards, as is the pedestrian environment. The more employees arriving by bike or via The High Line, the more successful the neighborhood will be.

As the nature of the office market changes—preferences, workplace culture, the blurred lines between the office and the surrounding neighborhood—developers and policymakers must react. By focusing on growing startup-friendly buildings—especially in Brooklyn and Queens—the city can work to replace the exodus of manufacturing employment. And by rethinking established office districts as opportunities for additional residential development, the city can meet the needs of tomorrow’s high-growth firms.

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Posted in Architecture | Downtown | Midtown | New York | Office | Residential | SHoP | Uncategorized | Vishaan Chakrabarti

New Look: 175 and 200 Greenwich Street

200 Greenwich Street -- image by Otie O'Daniel

While the Port Authority continues to stonewall efforts to complete the new World Trade Center, a talented reader has used existing schematics to create new renderings of 175 and 200 Greenwich Street, which illustrate the site’s ultimate appearance and obvious potential.

World Trade Center

200, 175, and 150 Greenwich — image by Otie O’Daniel

175 Greenwich Street will be the first of the two towers to rise, and may do so this year, assuming Silverstein and the Port Authority can come to an agreement. GroupM already has a tentative lease, and the base of the Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners-designed skyscraper has already made significant progress, with the first several floors now clad in glass and metal.

World Trade Center

200 Greenwich, 175 Greenwich, and 150 Greenwich — image by Otie O’Daniel

 

As the renderings show, 175 Greenwich Street will ultimately stand 1,175′ tall, though the supertall will still rank behind both One World Trade Center and 200 Greenwich Street in terms of height.

World Trade Center

200 Greenwich Street’s pinnacle, image by Otie O’Daniel

Completion of Two World Trade — aka 200 Greenwich — remains somewhat more elusive, but the Norman Foster-designed tower will likely become the crown jewel of the site once it is complete. Rumors have circulated that several banks have expressed interest in moving to the tower, but given the building will span 2.53 million square feet, something significantly more concrete will be necessary for the structure to begin rising.

World Trade Center

200 Greenwich, image by Otie O’Daniel

Nevertheless, once construction does begin, 200 Greenwich Street promises to bring positive changes to the vicinity, and its presence on the skyline will be iconic. The tower will stand 1,350′ to its pinnacle, almost putting it on-par with the roof of One World Trade Center.

World Trade Center

200 Greenwich facade, image by Otie O’Daniel

The renderings underscore the importance of reconstruction, especially as the Calatrava-designed Transit Hub comes closer to its opening day; the majority of the World Trade Center is about to be finished, yet the Port Authority’s lack of cooperation may result in a portion of the site remaining an active construction zone into the 2020s.

World Trade Center

Calatrava Hub wings & 175 Greenwich Street, image by Otie O’Daniel

Given the amount of office space coming online in Manhattan, 175 and 200 Greenwich face an uphill battle to secure tenants, but with other portions of the site now opening, commitments that will result in verticality are hopefully imminent. While Related and Brookfield’s projects on the Far West Side are close to Penn Station, their accessibility does not compare to the World Trade Center’s, which will hopefully guarantee the complete build-out of the WTC prior to 2020.

150 & 175 Greenwich and the World Trade Center Transit Hub

150 & 175 Greenwich and the World Trade Center Transit Hub

For now, 175 Greenwich remains stuck at its podium levels, while 200 Greenwich is a mechanical stump; at the very least, foundations for both buildings are complete, which means that once tenants are secured, construction can quickly proceed.

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Posted in 175 Greenwich | 2 World Trade | 200 Greenwich | 3 World Trade | Architecture | Downtown | New York | Office | Renderings | Silverstein | Supertall | World Trade Center

Revealed: 101 Tribeca, Downtown’s (Future) Tallest Residential Building

101 TriBeCa, image by KPF

YIMBY has the reveal for 101 Murray Street — aka 101 Tribeca — which is being developed by Fisher Brothers and The Witkoff Group. A tipster sent along the renderings, also confirming that the tower will become the tallest residential building in Lower Manhattan, surpassing both 56 Leonard and 30 Park Place; Kohn Pedersen Fox is the architect.

Previous renderings – apparently from a design competition — were deemed inaccurate, and thankfully so; KPF’s skyscraper will gracefully tower over its surrounds without a spaceship on top. The facade sweeps upwards from the base of the tower, culminating in a pointed pinnacle approximately 950 feet above the streets below.

101 Tribeca

101 Tribeca with One World Trade Center in background, image by KPF

The 63-story building will have 129 condominiums, with its entire floor area totaling 433,800 square feet. Ceilings will be palatial, and the glassy facade will offer sweeping views over Manhattan, New Jersey, and Long Island, enhanced by the tower’s relative isolation on the skyline.

Design-wise, 101 Tribeca bears semblance to 45 East 22nd Street, which is also a KPF project; both towers will expand as they rise, taking maximum advantage of allowed FAR by pushing their bulk where it is most profitable.

The project is removed from the heart of the Financial District, and it will become one of Lower Manhattan’s most prominent buildings, especially when viewed from the north. The 950′ figure may be approximate, and 101 Tribeca seems likely to approach the ‘supertall’ threshold of 1,000′; if the below rendering is correct, it may actually be slightly taller than the 977′ 150 Greenwich Street.

101 Murray Street

101 Tribeca, image by KPF

Pending design changes at 22 Thames — which was supposed to rise 960′, but has now traded hands — 101 Tribeca will rank as the third tallest building Downtown, behind One World Trade Center and 150 Greenwich Street. Lower Manhattan’s boom is now raging, though the former St. John’s dormitory must be demolished before construction on KPF’s latest marvel can begin.

Given the location and unbeatable views, pricing is likely to be astronomical. No completion date has been announced, but demolition of the existing structure appears imminent.

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Posted in 101 Murray Street | 101 Tribeca | Architecture | Downtown | FiDi | Fisher Brothers | Kohn Pedersen Fox | New York | Residential | Tribeca | Witkoff Group

Permits Filed: 92 Fulton Street

92 Fulton Street

92 Fulton Street traded hands for $10 million earlier this week, and Fisher Brothers’ latest acquisition already has a set of new permits; a recent proposal included the parcel in the assemblage for a larger tower, but evidently those plans are now defunct. Curtis + Ginsberg is listed as the architect of record.

The new filings indicate 92 Fulton Street will stand 16 floors and 147 feet to its pinnacle. Besides the 650 square feet of ground-floor retail, the building will have 17,870 square feet of residential space, split between ten units. Condominiums would seem likely, though ceiling heights will apparently be low.

Old rendering of 92 Fulton

Old rendering of 92 Fulton, via DBRDS

Plans for a smaller 92 Fulton Street are somewhat surprising considering the potential for a larger assemblage, though the ’boutique’ market in the Financial District is certainly thriving. Curtis + Ginsberg’s work is typically simple and brick, which would be quite the departure from conceptual schemes for the site. The project’s location would be a hard sell for anything cutting-edge, though another firm could be the design architect.

Despite the neighborhood’s current disadvantages, the opening of both the Calatrava Hub and Fulton Center will dramatically improve surrounds, as transit is about to become much more accessible. Given its proximity to eleven different subway lines, the submitted scope for 92 Fulton Street — which would have an FAR of 8.2 — is incredibly low, and zoning prohibits density that would fully realize the site’s potential.

Nearby, 112-118 Fulton Street is also about to rise; that site traded hands this week, with Carmel Partners set to buy from The Lightstone Group for over $170 million. The corridor is booming, and demand for new residential is clearly there, which is why restrictions on residential development in the Financial District do not make sense.

No completion date has been announced, but the site is almost ready for construction; pending DOB approval, a 2016 estimate would be reasonable.

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Posted in 92 Fulton Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Curtis + Ginsberg | Fisher Brothers | Mavrix Group | New York | Residential

Construction Update: The World Trade Center Transit Hub

The World Trade Center Transit Hub and One World Trade Center; 175 Greenwich at left

Construction has made major headway on all fronts at the World Trade Center’s Transportation Hub, where spokes are now being attached to the rib-cage. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey is building the $3.94 billion structure, which was designed by Santiago Calatrava.

Totaling 800,000 square-feet, the Transit Hub will connect major arteries to a central node directly underneath the new World Trade Center complex. While construction has taken many years, it will soon connect eleven subway lines, also servicing the PATH with three permanent platforms.

The World Trade Center Transit Hub

The World Trade Center Transit Hub

The design is impressive, and includes a retractable roof 150 feet above the street. The six underground floors will be warmed by sunlight from above; Calatrava’s inspiration originated with the idea of taking flight, and he has previously stated The Hub “resembles a bird being released from a child’s hand.”

All 114 ribs, or the steel portions that extend upward from street level to the angled sections, have now been installed; the arches above are also complete. Construction is currently focused on the wings that protrude outward, capping the structure. As of mid-June, over a dozen have been added, though — so far — the majority are on the site’s western side, removed from pedestrian access.

The World Trade Center Transit Hub

The World Trade Center Transit Hub

The Westfield Group is developing the retail portion of the Transit Hub, which will have a 365,000 square foot and 150-store underground mall. The Wall Street Journal has reported that 80% of the slots have already signed leases, with rents reportedly running between $400 and $500 per square foot. Big-name tenants already include Tom Ford, Zadig & Voltaire, and Apple; pictures of the interior’s progress have been posted on the site’s Facebook page.

The opening of the Transit Hub should jump-start the rest of the World Trade Center. Fighting between Silverstein and The Port Authority has jeopardized the future of 175 Greenwich Street — aka Three World Trade Center — which could remain on-hold if an agreement is not reached soon. GroupM’s lease has the potential to unravel if private financing is not secured by the end of this month, and the PA has seemingly walked away from the project.

150 & 175 Greenwich and the World Trade Center Transit Hub

150 & 175 Greenwich and the World Trade Center Transit Hub

Two World Trade Center’s completion is even further off, and that tower remains in a perpetual state of limbo. Construction fencing lining the site will continue to blight Church Street, and the chaotic pedestrian bottleneck at the intersection of Church and Vesey will remain impassable for the foreseeable future.

WTC Transit Hub

WTC Transit Hub

Luckily there’s light at the end of one tunnel, and the Transit Hub is set to open in December of 2015.

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Posted in 1 WTC | 175 Greenwich | 200 Greenwich | Calatrava | One World Trade Center | Port Authority | Silverstein | The Westfield Group | WTC Transit Center

YIMBY Today

Hunter's Point South with the new TF Cornerstone buildings at right; image by ODA

Hunter’s Point South [Crain’s New York]: Mayor De Blasio has taken the first step towards building out a large chunk of the Hunter’s Point waterfront in Long Island City by “moving forward with a nearly $100 million construction project to build both a new waterfront park and a series of roads, water mains and sewer lines”. Previously desolate, Hunter’s Point South will soon “be home to up to 5,000 units of housing.”

6200 8th Avenue [The Real Deal]: Developer Andrew Kohen, head of MSK Properties, has sold 6200 8th Avenue in Sunset Hill for $51.5 million. The buyers of the 160,700 square-foot site are “listed in property records as 62-08 Realty LLC and 37-19 Realty Inc.” Kohen previously had plans to build an 11-story residential building, along with a Home Depot, but that scheme crumbled after the financial downturn.

175 Greenwich Street [Crain’s New York]: The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will not provide the “$1.2 billion financial guarantee that would allow” the construction of 3 World Trade Center, where GroupM has already committed to taking 515,000 square feet. The PA is now resolving of a plan that would allow construction of Silverstein’s 80-story building through a “private-sector deal.”

239 West 52nd Street [The Real Deal]: Algin Management has plans to build a 59-story residential tower at the Roseland Ballroom site in the Theater District, and air rights for the project are currently being assembled; the developer recently bought 60,000 square-feet of air rights from a pair of Broadway theaters owned by The Shubert Organization.

280 Hawthorne Street [Curbed]: Residential Development Group is building four three-story townhouses at 280 Hawthorne Street in Prospect Lefferts Garden. The brick buildings will be a huge benefit to the community, repairing another hole in the urban landscape, while also infusing the street with new residents.

29-10 Hoyt Avenue South [Brownstoner]: A two-story brick building at 29-10 Hoyt Avenue South in Astoria has been bought by United Nu-Land Development LLC for $1.8 million. Zoning allows the developer to “building a new building more than three times the size of the existing one,” with a maximum FAR of 3.4. The full scope of plans have yet to be revealed.

347 Bowery [Bowery Boogie]: Developer Urban Muse is proceeding with on-site demolition after filing for permits a few months ago at 347 Bowery. “Twin sidewalk bridges” have been erected in front of the building which will soon be demolished for a 13-story residential tower.

115 7th Avenue [Crain’s New York]: The Rubin Museum is placing 115 7th Avenue in Chelsea on the market, where a 70,000 square-foot building could be built if a developer were to demolish the current five-story building. The “premier site” could potentially fetch more than $60 million.

180 East 88th Street [New York Times]: Developer DDG plans to demolish three townhouses at 180 East 88th Street in the Upper East Side for a residential building. The building has yet to be filed for with the Department, but DDG plans to “cantilever over the neighbor to the south.”

1370 Bushwick Avenue [Brownstoner]: Constructed has progressed at 1370 Bushwick Avenue, where a five-story, 10-unit building is being constructed. Once completed, the structure will have a brick façade with contemporary windows.

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Posted in 115 7th Avenue | 1370 Bushwick Avenue | 175 Greenwich | 180 East 88th Street | 280 Hawthorne Street | 29-10 Hoyt Avenue South | 347 Bowery | 6200 8th Avenue | Architecture | Bushwick | Chelsea | Hunter's Point | Hunter's Point South | New York | Office | Queens | Residential

New Renderings: 50 West Street

50 West Street and the new World Trade Center, image by DBOX

UPDATE: Reps have sent along new information to accompany the images, and “50 West residents will have access to amenities including a full-fitness center/60-foot lap swimming pool, a screening room, a library, as well as studios designated for children and arts and crafts,” and unexpectedly, the project will also have an observatory on the 64th floor, which “will serve as an exclusive entertaining space, offering views of New York Harbor, Ellis Island, and the Statue of Liberty.” Thomas Juul Hansen is designing interiors.

A tipster sent along a slew of new renderings for 50 West Street, which has seen several design revisions over the course of its prolonged conception. As work has resumed at other projects, excavation on the Helmut Jahn-designed tower has been ongoing, and the structure will soon rise above ground level; Time Equities is the developer.

50 West Street

50 West Street, image by DBOX

Permits — which were approved earlier this month — indicate that 50 West Street will stand 783′ to its pinnacle. The tower will total 427,177 square feet, with a 21,127 square foot commercial component on the first two levels; at the top, a duplex penthouse spanning 62 and 63 will cap the structure’s 191 condominiums.

50 West Street

With One World Trade Center, image by DBOX

Renderings include the first look inside the tower as well; some units will include double-height living rooms, and views will be sweeping. 50 West Street will be the tallest building in the immediate vicinity, located just a few blocks south of the new World Trade Center, and well outside any shadows. Its relative prominence will be somewhat diminished by the 961′ 22 Thames Street, which will soon rise to the northeast, but it will still rank as one of the tallest residential skyscrapers in New York City.

50 West Street Double Height Living Room

Double Height Living Room, image by DBOX

While the vicinity is not particularly friendly to pedestrians, the rise of 50 West will still improve a formerly vacant lot. Next-door, the Battery Parking Garage presents another prime development opportunity, and removing and revitalizing that site would present an opportunity to further improve the neighborhood.

50 West Street Entrance

Entrance, image by Dbox

The delay in construction at 50 West Street has resulted in some benefits, as the design has been re-imagined to cope with the threat of potential flooding, made obvious after Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the neighborhood.

50 West Street and One World Trade Center

50 West Street and One World Trade Center, image by DBOX

Completion is slated for 2016.

50 West Street

50 West Street View, image by Dbox

50 West Street

Adjacent plaza, image by DBOX

50 West Street

Lobby, image by Dbox

50 West Street Double Height Living Room

Double Height Living Room, image by DBOX

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Posted in 50 West Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Helmut Jahn | New York | Renderings | Residential | Time Equities

Construction Update: 30 Park Place

30 Park Place

Construction continues at 30 Park Place in TriBeCa, and facade installation has now begun on the lower levels, where pre-fabricated panels are being placed along the exterior. Above, the levels marking the building’s transition from hotel to residential is obvious, and ceiling heights for remaining floors will be lofty. The architect is Robert A.M. Stern, and Silverstein is the developer.

30 Park Place

The first of the facade

Once completed, the mixed-use residential and hotel tower will stand 937 feet and 67 stories above street level. The Four Seasons Hotel and Residences will have 185 hotel rooms and house 157 condominiums. Since last month’s update, the setback at the building’s 24th level has been passed, the structure is approaching its 30th floor.

30 Park Place

Panels awaiting installation

30 Park Place

The back-side of the pre-cast concrete panels

30 Park Place

Waiting for installation

Aside from the crane jumps and concrete pours, panels for the facade are also arriving, and have quickly wrapped around a major portion of the base. What looks like limestone is actually pre-cast concrete, but from afar, the difference is not obvious. Ignoring the visible expansion joints, the cladding is a pleasant departue from typical new construction in the Financial District, which tends towards glassy.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place

Vertical momentum has seemingly lessened with the construction of residential levels, but the disparity in ceiling heights would explain the difference. The relative uniformity of remaining floors should see the resumption of 30 Park Place’s rapid rise, and completion is expected in 2015.

30 Park Place

30 Park Place

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Posted in 30 Park Place | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Four Seasons | Hotel | New York | Residential | Robert Stern Architects | Silverstein

Construction Update: 5 Beekman

5 Beekman Street

Construction is making rapid headway at 5 Beekman, and the project’s residential component is now rising above Nassau Street. The site’s developer is GFI, and the architect of record is Gerner, Kronick + Valcarcel.

5 Beekman Street

5 Beekman’s residential expansion

Shrouding along much of the Temple Court Building has been removed, revealing an exterior in the midst of refurbishment; the hotel will have 287 rooms, while the new residential tower will total 68 units, spanning 47 floors.

5 Beekman Street

5 Beekman Street, shrouding has been removed from part of the old Temple Court Building

Despite construction’s progression above street level, on-site renderings are nowhere to be found, though zoning diagrams filed with the DOB give inklings regarding the tower’s form. The slender, 621′ skyscraper will apparently have rooftop ornamentation, complementing its historic counterpart, which was completed in 1883. Parapets could push 5 Beekman’s pinnacle to the 700′ mark, and the structure will leave a definite mark on the local skyline, though the 870-foot 8 Spruce Street will continue to dominate the vicinity.

5 Beekman Street

5 Beekman, The Lara at left

Fencing and scaffolding covering an adjacent alley have yielded a large transient population, though the situation is likely temporary. 5 Beekman’s completion will further improve the neighborhood, revitalizing an empty old building, and breathing life into a relatively neglected corner of the Financial District.

Scary alley next to 5 Beekman

Scary alley next to 5 Beekman

Momentum in the immediate vicinity seems to be increasing, and across the street, another tower will soon rise at 1 Beekman. The surge in new construction began with 8 Spruce and continued with The Lara, which is immediately adjacent to the future 5 Beekman’s residential component, which is actually rising at 115 Nassau Street.

5 Beekman Street

5 Beekman, residential tower

Completion is likely by 2016, with the hotel component set for a 2015 opening date.

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Posted in 5 Beekman Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Downtown | FiDi | Gerner Kronick + Valcarcal | GFI Development | New York | Residential

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