Revealed: 446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street -- image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

While yesterday’s renderings of HAP’s Karim Rashid-designed 329 Pleasant Avenue generated a significant amount of discussion on both sides of the aesthetic fence, the firm’s plans for 446 West 167th Street are slightly more subdued, as depicted in today’s fresh reveal. The project is rising in West Harlem near New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia Medical Center, and the architect of record is Daniel Goldner.

Permits indicate that 446 West 167th Street will stand eight stories tall, with a total of 39 units; the development’s square footage will be divided between the residential space and additional components, with an ambulatory care center to be located on the first floor, and a ‘community facility’ set to occupy space on the second level. In total, HAP’s building will have 33,149 square feet, with the majority — measuring 25,968 square feet — to be divided between the condominiums.

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street — image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

For better or worse, the plan for 446 West 167th Street lacks the pink and blue balconies that will cling to the exterior of 329 Pleasant Avenue; instead, Goldner’s design is contextual, and takes visual cues from its pre-war neighbors. The street-wall will be kept intact, and the facade will be characterized by neutral tones; overall, 446 West 167th Street will be a relatively tame addition to Washington Heights.

HAP’s page on the development discusses the project’s target demographic, which is students and professionals looking to live near their work; in their own words, “the apartments [at 446 West 167th Street] were specifically conceived for first time home buyers.”

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street, image via Google Maps

No completion date has been formally announced, and there is a stop-work order currently in effect for the site; despite this, construction permits were issued on March 3rd, and vertical progress is likely imminent.

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Posted in 446 West 167th Street | Architecture | Daniel Goldner Architects | HAP | Harlem | New York | Renderings | Residential | Washington Heights

Revealed: 329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

The first renderings are up for a new building set to rise at 329 Pleasant Avenue, in East Harlem; for those unfamiliar with the neighborhood, the cross-streets place the project one block east of First Avenue and 117th Street. While TPG is listed as the architect of record on DOB permits, HAP — which is developing the site — notes that the project’s designer is Karim Rashid.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue from above, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Most of East Harlem is far from prime real estate — and even designating the area as ‘up and coming’ may be somewhat of a stretch — but the micro-hood surrounding 329 Pleasant Avenue is a marked contrast to much of the vicinity. 329 Pleasant Avenue has several blocks of pre-war stock surrounding it on all sides, which adds a buffer against the massive public housing developments that still characterize much of the neighborhood.

Additionally, a variety of big-box stores have their only Manhattan presence just to the east of 329 Pleasant Avenue, including Costco. While many New Yorkers have to drive to the FDR-adjacent outpost, HAP’s project is within a short walking distance.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue, rear view; image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Aesthetically, the eight-story building presents a bright contrast to its pre-war surrounds, with the pink and blue balconies offering a decided departure from the neighborhood vernacular. While the disruption of the street-wall is unfortunate, East Harlem has bigger issues that must be dealt with, and developing more infill housing takes precedence over perfect design.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue living room, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Besides the balconies, 329 Pleasant Avenue’s presence is modern and straight-forward, with the majority of frills confined to within the structure. HAP’s page on the building notes that it will have twenty apartments, as well as street-level retail. Permits indicate the site’s total scope is 15,255 square feet, with 640 square feet to be dedicated to commercial space.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue bedroom — image via Karim Rashid/HAP

No completion date has been announced, but permits for construction were partially approved last October; given the size of the project, a 2015 opening date would be a reasonable assumption.

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Posted in 329 Pleasant Avenue | Architecture | East Harlem | HAP | Karim Rashid | New York | Residential | TPG Architecture

Revealed: Harlem Dowling

Harlem Dowling -- image via Urban Quotient

The first permits are up for a long-neglected lot at 2139 Seventh Avenue, on the corner of 127th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard. Accompanying the permits are renderings from architect Urban Quotient, which is heading the project’s design; the building will be known as Harlem Dowling, and it will be a mix of community facilities and affordable housing, with HPD and Alembic Development heading construction.

2139 Seventh Avenue gets its name from the Harlem Dowling West Side Center for Children and Services, which will be one of the two organizations occupying the structure; the other will be Childrens’ Village, and both community organizations work to assist foster children.

Besides the community component, Harlem Dowling will have 60 units of affordable housing. The renderings of the project — posted on Urban Quotient’s website — are significantly above-par for an all-affordable development, and offer further proof that low-income housing can be attractive. The building’s form will be simple, and its appearance reflects the structure’s context within its predominantly pre-war neighborhood.

Per Urban Quotient, the “red and pale yellow metal panels on the facade act as a counterpoint to the more traditional brick, providing an outward vibrancy reflecting the program and mission inside.”

Harlem Dowling

Harlem Dowling’s site today — via Google Maps

Harlem Dowling will be beneficial for several reasons; it will serve some of New York’s most needy citizens, giving a new home to organizations that provide a crucial function for the city. Additionally, the structure itself will have a positive impact on the neighborhood, as the vacant lot had been an eyesore. Restoring urban integrity is crucial to Harlem’s revitalization, and 2139 Seventh Avenue is a definite step in the right direction.

The vast bulk of the space at Harlem Dowling will be dedicated to affordable housing; of the development’s 62,598 square feet, 8,771 square feet will be given to the community facilities. 2139 Seventh Avenue will stand ten stories tall.

On the same block — immediately to the south — another nine-story building is about to begin rising at 181 West 126th Street. The collective momentum will further enhance the neighborhood’s urban appeal.

No completion date for Harlem Dowling has been announced, but construction appears imminent.

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Posted in 2139 Seventh Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | Harlem Dowling | HPD | New York | Residential | Urban Quotient

Permits Filed: 181 West 126th Street

181 West 126th Street -- image via Google Maps

Permits have been filed for a nine-story mixed-use building at 181 West 126th Street, on the corner of Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard; the existing low-rise is occupied by a restaurant. The architect of record is Frank Petruso, and the developer is ’2121 ACP LLC.’

181 West 126th Street will measure just under 20,000 square feet in total; the first floor will have 2,430 square feet of retail, while the remainder of the development will be residential. The project will have 22 units, which will average under 800 square feet, likely indicating a predominance of studio and one-bedroom apartments.

Frank Petruso’s website has no information on the development, though the firm’s portfolio gives a glimpse at the architect’s aesthetic, which seems to be tinged with faux-historic inspiration.

Whatever the final design, West Harlem is rapidly evolving, and re-developing under-utilized lots is crucial to the neighborhood’s continued success. Revitalization appears to be accelerating, as several major retail projects are under construction on 125th Street; Harlem’s tallest building has also been proposed a relatively short walk away, at 1800 Park Avenue.

No completion date has been announced, but demolition permits for the existing structure were filed in October, so construction appears to be imminent.

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Posted in 181 West 126th Street | 2121 ACP LLC | Architecture | Construction Update | Frank Petruso | Harlem | New York | Residential

Demolition Update: CREATE @ Harlem Green

Harlem Green - Taystee Cake Demolition

The Taystee Cake Bakery redevelopment in Harlem is making major progress, and demolition is in full swing on the old factory, which is located on 126th Street off of Amsterdam Avenue. The project is being developed by Janus Partners and Monadnock, and will consist of a variety of uses; the new facility will be dubbed CREATE @ Harlem Green, with 300,000 square feet of space, and the NYCEDC’s page on the site has full details.

Levenbetts is designing the project, which will comprise a decent chunk of the block bounded by 125th/126th Streets, between Amsterdam and Morningside Avenues. Harlem Green will be relatively short, but its form is urban-friendly, and the building’s first floor will be geared towards pedestrians. Levenbetts’ website has additional renderings of the development, which indicate a significant positive change from the design’s first iteration.

Harlem Green

Harlem Green – image from Levenbett

Manufacturing will see the most dedicated space, with 100,000 square feet. Companies including Harlem Brewing and Greenpoint Manufacturing & Design will be moving into the building, further accelerating the rapid demographic changes in West Harlem. The surrounding blocks are free of major public housing projects, and as abandoned buildings continue to be redeveloped, the desirability of the neighborhood will continue to increase.

Besides manufacturing, Harlem Green will have 90,000 square feet of office, 40,000 square feet of retail, and 10,000 square feet of community space. The retail is particularly important, as West Harlem is largely lacking in terms of store-front opportunities, and even 125th Street remains relatively run-down.

Harlem Green

Harlem Green – image from Levenbett

In itself the redevelopment is minor, but when taken with new developments nearby – which include Columbia’s Manhattanville Expansion – Harlem Green is a sign of a neighborhood that is on a rapid upswing. Completion dates have not been posted on-site, but the building should be finished by the 2015-16 timeframe, and construction will begin in 2014.

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Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | Harlem Green | Levenbetts | New York | Office | West Harlem

Construction Update: 71 West 126th Street

71 West 126th Street

A new residential building is finishing up at 71 West 126th Street, and the small-scale project – which only has eight units – is a beneficial transition from abandonment to modern contextuality.

71 West 126th Street

71 West 126th Street

The interiors of two existing townhomes were retained, while the facades were completely removed. The end-product of the renovation has bands of clay-colored concrete wrapping across enlarged windows, and also adds a two-story penthouse to the roof.

While the style of the new building is modern, the color of the facade makes it less noticeable, and it perfectly matches surrounding brownstones. Preserving the character of 126th Street’s historic street-scape should be a priority, but 71 West 126th is fairly tame, and actually blends into its neighbors.

71 West 126th Street

71 West 126th Street

Permits for 71 West 126th Street indicate AEN Architects designed the conversion, and the developers are Great Hill Equities and – per The New York Daily News - singer Roberta Flack.

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Posted in 71 West 126th Street | AEN Architects | Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | New York | Residential

Construction Update: Columbia Manhattanville Expansion

Columbia Manhattanville Expansion

The first of the buildings to rise as part of the new Columbia Manhattanville campus has made major progress, and topped-out in early October. With 450,000 square feet of space, the structure will become the Jerome L. Greene Science Center; the architect is Renzo Piano.

The entirety of Columbia’s plan will add 15 new buildings, cost $6.8 billion, and transform an empty part of Harlem into a thriving hub for higher education; the neighborhood is currently dominated by old warehouses, high-rise NYCHA properties, and auto-oriented retail. The Wall Street Journal has additional details on the project.

Columbia Manhattanville Expansion

Columbia Manhattanville Expansion

Sitting next to the 125th Street stop for the 1 Train, the new campus enjoys prime transit accessibility, and the density is more than warranted. Surrounding blocks were thoroughly ravaged by Robert Moses, and the resulting urban form – by and large – is extremely hostile to pedestrians, and aesthetically unappealing.

Completion of the Science Center is expected in 2016, and the full campus build-out is planned for the 2020s. With the development spread over 17 acres, the positive impact on the surrounding neighborhood will be felt rapidly, and will become obvious long before the entire plan is completed.

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Posted in Architecture | Columbia Manhattanville | Construction Update | Harlem | New York | Renzo Piano | Starchitecture

Construction Update: 121 East 125th Street

121 East 125th Street

Work on the former Corn Exchange Building at 121 East 125th Street is in full swing; the existing shell will be incorporated into the new structure. The development will have have an office component of 22,000 square feet, and 7,000 square feet of retail.

The Corn Exchange renovation and rehabilitation will go beyond simply preserving the old facade, instead constructing a new building that will actually match the derelict structure. An on-site rendering shows a rehabilitation that looks legitimately pre-war, and the development will be a major improvement for a section of 125th Street that remains forlorn.

121 East 125th Street

121 East 125th Street

121 East 125th Street

121 East 125th Street, image from YIMBY reader Brett

Signage indicates the historic revival is expected to be completed in 2014.

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Posted in 121 East 125th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | New York | Residential

Construction Update: 5-15 West 125th Street

5-15 West 125th Street

A new low-rise project with a significant retail component has begun construction at 5-15 West 125th Street, with excavation now underway. The development will have 100,000 square feet of retail space, and spans the width of the block; it will stand four stories tall.

Permits note the developer of 5-15 West 125th Street as CA 5-15 West 125th Street LLC, and the architect is the Rosenbaum Design Group, though the firm’s website has no information on the project.

5-15 West 125th Street

5-15 West 125th Street

While the revitalization of 125th Street should be applauded, the recent re-zoning barely alleviated the restraints on the neighborhood, which remain severe; 5-15 West 125th Street will look similar to other big-box and retail-driven developments that have risen along the thoroughfare. While their function is beneficial, the aesthetics are lacking.

Given the transit accessibility of 125th Street, there should be additional allowances for development, to prevent the monotony that is becoming increasingly abundant. 121 East 125th Street is a notable exception to this trend, but overall, allowing denser development would, perhaps, encourage more aesthetically and urban-friendly buildings.

5-15 West 125th Street

5-15 West 125th Street

Completion of 5-15 West 125th Street is expected in 2014.

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Posted in 5-15 West 125th Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | New York | Residential

Construction Update: One Morningside Park

One Morningside Park

YIMBY reader Michael sent in the above photos of One Morningside Park on 110th Street, which has topped out – though the facade remains missing in action. The 22-story condo building will house 55 units. The building’s website – which also has renderings – suggests that about half of the units have already entered into contract. Designed by GF55 Partners, the complex makes literal use of air rights with a significant cantilever over its northern neighbor. The terrace units should have an excellent view of neighboring Morningside Park, as well as the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.

The construction is part of a larger gentrification of Harlem and is located next to the 110th Street B and C subway lines, providing quick access to Midtown Manhattan. One Morningside’s location has seen rapid improvement in recent years, with several new developments rising in the vicinity; demographically, the building is a manifestation of the Upper West Side’s northward expansion. With the continued push of gentrification, Morningside Park itself may be on the verge of a renaissance – Morningside has long played second-fiddle to the much-larger Central Park, but continued improvements to the neighborhood could be a catalyst for renewal.

While One Morningside Park’s design is far from cutting-edge, it does fit into the neighborhood surroundings aesthetically – and especially physically, given the building’s jigsaw-like cantilever over its pre-war neighbor.

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Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | GF55 Partners | Harlem | New York | One Morningside Park | Residential

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