YIMBY Today

341 Canal Street -- image via Curbed

341 Canal Street [Curbed]: The Landmarks Preservation Commission gave approval to a “Gene Kaufman-designed six-story retail and residential building” at 341 Canal Street in SoHo. The site has remained vacant for years for financial reasons, but soon, something may finally rise on the street corner.

335 St Nicholas Avenue [Wychoff Heights]: Demolition permits have been submitted for a one-story office and warehouse building at 335 St. Nicholas Avenue in Ridgewood. A “new four-story residential building is proposed for the site,” which will house 14 units.

363-365 Bond Street [DNAinfo New York]: Resident complaints have confirmed that foundation work is well underway at 365 Bond Street in Gowanus, where the Lightstone Group is building a 700-unit abode. Pictorial evidence shows pile-drivers at work, grounding the roots for what will become a 12-story building. Pile driving should “continue for the next 30 business days”.

49 Dupont Street [The Real Deal]: On Monday, Dupont Street Developers bought a 10-parcel industrial warehouse at 49 Dupont Street with “260,911 square feet of as-of-right development potential,” in addition to another 100,000 square feet in potential affordable housing bonuses. Directly across from residential projects 77 Commercial and Greenpoint Landing, this underdeveloped and soon-to-be rapidly changing area of Greenpoint will utilize its convenient location, with proximity to Manhattan, LIC and DoBro. Reportedly, the “new owners were considering a plan to build three residential towers on the site”.

227 Cherry Street [Bowery Boogie]: Demolition is going smoothly at the Pathmark site of Extell’s planned 68-story and 787-unit residential tower on the Lower East Side, at 227 Cherry Street. In a part of Manhattan where skyscrapers are non-existent, Extell’s tower will challenge New Yorkers on how they view the predominantly low-income housing neighborhood; expect close coverage of this project’s progress.

311 State Street [Brownstoner]: Developer State Renaissance Townhomes owns another stretch of State Street in Boerum Hill, this time on the corner of Hoyt Street. Although “no work has started behind the construction fence,” a rendering of Neo-Georgian townhouses, like the ones at 345-353 State, has been posted on site. According to PropertyShark, the site comes with 25,534 buildable square feet.

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Posted in 227 Cherry Street | 311 State Street | 335 St. Nicholas Avenue | 341 Canal Street | 363-365 Bond Street | 49 Dupont Street | Architecture | Construction Update | Dupont Street Developers | Extell | New York | Residential

Revealed: 315 West 121st Street

315 West 121st Street -- image by Soluri Architecture

The first permits are up for a boutique residential development in Harlem, at 315 West 121st Street. Brad Simmons of 121 Holdings LLC is listed as the developer, while the architect of record is Soluri.

Previous DOB filings for a ‘horizontal extension’ were disapproved late last year, but the new plans are roughly similar — at least in scope — and indicate the structure will be a completely new building. 315 West 121st Street will span 19,802 square feet, and the entirety of the development will be residential, with 8 units in total.

Renderings of the site were posted to Soluri’s Architizer page, and reveal a glassy building; the facade is ‘sliced’ along a diagonal, leaving room for small balconies along a portion of the exterior. While the overall design is somewhat attractive — and at worst benign — the structure recedes from the sidewalk, leaving a slight gap in the block’s street-wall. The only potentially serious issue with the scheme is a fence rendered next to the project, indicating the possibility of a permanent gap between 315 West 121st Street and its eastern neighbor.

315 West 121st Street

315 West 121st Street — image via Google Maps

Despite minor faults in the design, the eight-story and 80′ tall building will be a relatively contextual addition to the neighborhood, where vacant lots are still highly visible. Construction activity in Harlem dropped off significantly during and immediately after the 2008 recession, and the resumption of a mini-development boom will help heal scars left by the post-war period, which remain abundant.

No completion date has been announced, but per Soluri’s Architizer page — which also notes the building will have four full-floor two bedroom units, a duplex penthouse, and a triplex garden-level apartment — construction is slated to begin this year.

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Posted in 121 Holdings LLC | 315 West 121st Street | Architecture | Harlem | New York | Residential | Soluri Architecture

Permits Filed: 2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

The first permits are up for a development at 2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard, just off the northwest corner of Central Park and 110th Street, on the site of a former BP gas station. Curbed covered the site’s progress at the end of last year, but plans have apparently been slightly downsized since then, when the building was expected to measure 125,000 square feet. Artimus Construction is the developer, and FX Fowle is the architect of record.

DOB filings indicate 2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard will total 87,776 square feet, including a 4,677 square foot commercial component, and an 8,481 square foot community facility. The remaining 74,621 square feet will be divided between 50 residences, a decrease from the 56 that were formerly announced, and the building will stand 12 stories and 140 feet tall.

2040 8th Avenue’s redevelopment is a boon for the neighborhood at large, as the BP gas station had survived long past its prime. While the revitalization of Harlem began relatively recently, the site of FX Fowle’s latest building is situated in a prime location — the Uptown equivalent of a less-central Columbus Circle.

Given the accessibility of the site, the planned scope of 2040 Frederick Douglass is underwhelming, as the lot is literally adjacent to the B and C trains. Developments that can take advantage of under-utilized transit should be built to an appropriate scale, and a residential FAR of 5.53 is what one would typically expect in a large suburb, rather than New York City.

2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard

Many developments in New York do not meet their full potential, and the problem usually comes down to zoning, which is the issue at 2040 Frederick Douglass. FX Fowle’s plans for the building are likely to be attractive, and the firm’s recent projects in Manhattan are universally appealing. Nevertheless, it is unfortunate that something on a scale befitting the potentially iconic location is not being built.

No completion date has been announced.

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Posted in 2040 Frederick Douglass Boulevard | Architecture | Artimus Construction | FX Fowle | Harlem | New York | Residential

Revealed: 2269 First Avenue

2269 First Avenue -- image by Isaac & Stern

Isaac & Stern‘s recent slate of work is verging on prolific, as the firm is heading the design of yet another building, at 2269 First Avenue; the site is located on the southwest corner of 1st Avenue and 117th Street. Acuity Capital Partners is developing the site.

The old 2269 First Avenue is a five-story school, which will be saved and integrated into the base of the new building as both residences and commercial space. Permits indicate that the re-development will total 69,093 square feet, approximately 25,000 square feet larger than the current structure. 3,995 square feet on the ground-level will be dedicated to retail, while the remainder will be divided between 90 units.

2269 First Avenue

2269 First Avenue’s initial re-design plan, image via Curbed

2269 First Avenue has had an active recent history, and the first plans for the site’s redevelopment were floated on Curbed back in 2005, when the proposal was compared to The Switch Building’s “crackhead younger sibling.”

2269 First Avenue

2269 First Avenue — image by Isaac & Stern

Luckily the project’s aesthetic has evolved, and Isaac & Stern’s involvement has been a major positive for the site’s future. Instead of an awkward glass addition, the historic school will be integrated into the base of a more mindful expansion, with casement windows dominating the old and new; a sliver of the upper floors will be contemporarily-inspired, but even that component appears to be incorporated in a tasteful manner.

2269 First Avenue

2269 First Avenue aerial, via Google Maps

While no completion date has been announced, permits for the expansion were approved last June.

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Posted in 2269 First Avenue | Acuity Capital Partners | Architecture | East Harlem | New York | Renderings | Residential

Revealed: 1770 Madison Avenue

1770 Madison Avenue

The first renderings have been posted on-site for a new building at 1770 Madison Avenue in East Harlem, which is located at the intersection of Madison Avenue and 116th Street; the images were sent in by a watchful tipster. Joseph Rabizadeh of the Low Income Marketing Group is developing the site, and the architect of record is Avinash Malhotra.

Permits for 1770 Madison Avenue indicate the building will span 36,675 square feet, with space split between a variety of uses. The first two floors will have 5,124 square feet of retail space, and 6,310 square feet dedicated to a ‘community facility,’ which will apparently be used as a medical office. The remainder of the project will be divided amongst 32 apartments.

1770 Madison Avenue

1770 Madison Avenue; excavation underway

Design-wise, the glimpse is a tad blurry, but the aesthetic appears inoffensive and contextual. Zoning diagrams give an additional look at the project’s massing, and it will conform to the street-wall while enhancing the neighborhood through the contribution of new retail space.

While Harlem has seen significant improvements in recent years, vacant lots — like 1770 Madison Avenue — continue to plague the area. Restoring the neighborhood’s built form is an important first step in its revitalization, though if it is to live up to its highest potential, the damage that Robert Moses wrought must be fixed.

Completion of 1770 Madison Avenue is expected in the summer of 2015.

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Posted in 1770 Madison Avenue | Architecture | Avinash Malhotra | Construction Update | East Harlem | Harlem | Low Income Marketing Group | New York | Renderings | Residential

Revealed: 446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street -- image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

While yesterday’s renderings of HAP’s Karim Rashid-designed 329 Pleasant Avenue generated a significant amount of discussion on both sides of the aesthetic fence, the firm’s plans for 446 West 167th Street are slightly more subdued, as depicted in today’s fresh reveal. The project is rising in West Harlem near New York-Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia Medical Center, and the architect of record is Daniel Goldner.

Permits indicate that 446 West 167th Street will stand eight stories tall, with a total of 39 units; the development’s square footage will be divided between the residential space and additional components, with an ambulatory care center to be located on the first floor, and a ‘community facility’ set to occupy space on the second level. In total, HAP’s building will have 33,149 square feet, with the majority — measuring 25,968 square feet — to be divided between the condominiums.

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street — image from HAP/Daniel Goldner

For better or worse, the plan for 446 West 167th Street lacks the pink and blue balconies that will cling to the exterior of 329 Pleasant Avenue; instead, Goldner’s design is contextual, and takes visual cues from its pre-war neighbors. The street-wall will be kept intact, and the facade will be characterized by neutral tones; overall, 446 West 167th Street will be a relatively tame addition to Washington Heights.

HAP’s page on the development discusses the project’s target demographic, which is students and professionals looking to live near their work; in their own words, “the apartments [at 446 West 167th Street] were specifically conceived for first time home buyers.”

446 West 167th Street

446 West 167th Street, image via Google Maps

No completion date has been formally announced, and there is a stop-work order currently in effect for the site; despite this, construction permits were issued on March 3rd, and vertical progress is likely imminent.

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Posted in 446 West 167th Street | Architecture | Daniel Goldner Architects | HAP | Harlem | New York | Renderings | Residential | Washington Heights

Revealed: 329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

The first renderings are up for a new building set to rise at 329 Pleasant Avenue, in East Harlem; for those unfamiliar with the neighborhood, the cross-streets place the project one block east of First Avenue and 117th Street. While TPG is listed as the architect of record on DOB permits, HAP — which is developing the site — notes that the project’s designer is Karim Rashid.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue from above, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Most of East Harlem is far from prime real estate — and even designating the area as ‘up and coming’ may be somewhat of a stretch — but the micro-hood surrounding 329 Pleasant Avenue is a marked contrast to much of the vicinity. 329 Pleasant Avenue has several blocks of pre-war stock surrounding it on all sides, which adds a buffer against the massive public housing developments that still characterize much of the neighborhood.

Additionally, a variety of big-box stores have their only Manhattan presence just to the east of 329 Pleasant Avenue, including Costco. While many New Yorkers have to drive to the FDR-adjacent outpost, HAP’s project is within a short walking distance.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue, rear view; image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Aesthetically, the eight-story building presents a bright contrast to its pre-war surrounds, with the pink and blue balconies offering a decided departure from the neighborhood vernacular. While the disruption of the street-wall is unfortunate, East Harlem has bigger issues that must be dealt with, and developing more infill housing takes precedence over perfect design.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue living room, image via Karim Rashid/HAP

Besides the balconies, 329 Pleasant Avenue’s presence is modern and straight-forward, with the majority of frills confined to within the structure. HAP’s page on the building notes that it will have twenty apartments, as well as street-level retail. Permits indicate the site’s total scope is 15,255 square feet, with 640 square feet to be dedicated to commercial space.

329 Pleasant Avenue

329 Pleasant Avenue bedroom — image via Karim Rashid/HAP

No completion date has been announced, but permits for construction were partially approved last October; given the size of the project, a 2015 opening date would be a reasonable assumption.

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Posted in 329 Pleasant Avenue | Architecture | East Harlem | HAP | Karim Rashid | New York | Residential | TPG Architecture

Revealed: Harlem Dowling

Harlem Dowling -- image via Urban Quotient

The first permits are up for a long-neglected lot at 2139 Seventh Avenue, on the corner of 127th Street and Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard. Accompanying the permits are renderings from architect Urban Quotient, which is heading the project’s design; the building will be known as Harlem Dowling, and it will be a mix of community facilities and affordable housing, with HPD and Alembic Development heading construction.

2139 Seventh Avenue gets its name from the Harlem Dowling West Side Center for Children and Services, which will be one of the two organizations occupying the structure; the other will be Childrens’ Village, and both community organizations work to assist foster children.

Besides the community component, Harlem Dowling will have 60 units of affordable housing. The renderings of the project — posted on Urban Quotient’s website — are significantly above-par for an all-affordable development, and offer further proof that low-income housing can be attractive. The building’s form will be simple, and its appearance reflects the structure’s context within its predominantly pre-war neighborhood.

Per Urban Quotient, the “red and pale yellow metal panels on the facade act as a counterpoint to the more traditional brick, providing an outward vibrancy reflecting the program and mission inside.”

Harlem Dowling

Harlem Dowling’s site today — via Google Maps

Harlem Dowling will be beneficial for several reasons; it will serve some of New York’s most needy citizens, giving a new home to organizations that provide a crucial function for the city. Additionally, the structure itself will have a positive impact on the neighborhood, as the vacant lot had been an eyesore. Restoring urban integrity is crucial to Harlem’s revitalization, and 2139 Seventh Avenue is a definite step in the right direction.

The vast bulk of the space at Harlem Dowling will be dedicated to affordable housing; of the development’s 62,598 square feet, 8,771 square feet will be given to the community facilities. 2139 Seventh Avenue will stand ten stories tall.

On the same block — immediately to the south — another nine-story building is about to begin rising at 181 West 126th Street. The collective momentum will further enhance the neighborhood’s urban appeal.

No completion date for Harlem Dowling has been announced, but construction appears imminent.

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Posted in 2139 Seventh Avenue | Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | Harlem Dowling | HPD | New York | Residential | Urban Quotient

Permits Filed: 181 West 126th Street

181 West 126th Street -- image via Google Maps

Permits have been filed for a nine-story mixed-use building at 181 West 126th Street, on the corner of Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard; the existing low-rise is occupied by a restaurant. The architect of record is Frank Petruso, and the developer is ’2121 ACP LLC.’

181 West 126th Street will measure just under 20,000 square feet in total; the first floor will have 2,430 square feet of retail, while the remainder of the development will be residential. The project will have 22 units, which will average under 800 square feet, likely indicating a predominance of studio and one-bedroom apartments.

Frank Petruso’s website has no information on the development, though the firm’s portfolio gives a glimpse at the architect’s aesthetic, which seems to be tinged with faux-historic inspiration.

Whatever the final design, West Harlem is rapidly evolving, and re-developing under-utilized lots is crucial to the neighborhood’s continued success. Revitalization appears to be accelerating, as several major retail projects are under construction on 125th Street; Harlem’s tallest building has also been proposed a relatively short walk away, at 1800 Park Avenue.

No completion date has been announced, but demolition permits for the existing structure were filed in October, so construction appears to be imminent.

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Posted in 181 West 126th Street | 2121 ACP LLC | Architecture | Construction Update | Frank Petruso | Harlem | New York | Residential

Demolition Update: CREATE @ Harlem Green

Harlem Green - Taystee Cake Demolition

The Taystee Cake Bakery redevelopment in Harlem is making major progress, and demolition is in full swing on the old factory, which is located on 126th Street off of Amsterdam Avenue. The project is being developed by Janus Partners and Monadnock, and will consist of a variety of uses; the new facility will be dubbed CREATE @ Harlem Green, with 300,000 square feet of space, and the NYCEDC’s page on the site has full details.

Levenbetts is designing the project, which will comprise a decent chunk of the block bounded by 125th/126th Streets, between Amsterdam and Morningside Avenues. Harlem Green will be relatively short, but its form is urban-friendly, and the building’s first floor will be geared towards pedestrians. Levenbetts’ website has additional renderings of the development, which indicate a significant positive change from the design’s first iteration.

Harlem Green

Harlem Green – image from Levenbett

Manufacturing will see the most dedicated space, with 100,000 square feet. Companies including Harlem Brewing and Greenpoint Manufacturing & Design will be moving into the building, further accelerating the rapid demographic changes in West Harlem. The surrounding blocks are free of major public housing projects, and as abandoned buildings continue to be redeveloped, the desirability of the neighborhood will continue to increase.

Besides manufacturing, Harlem Green will have 90,000 square feet of office, 40,000 square feet of retail, and 10,000 square feet of community space. The retail is particularly important, as West Harlem is largely lacking in terms of store-front opportunities, and even 125th Street remains relatively run-down.

Harlem Green

Harlem Green – image from Levenbett

In itself the redevelopment is minor, but when taken with new developments nearby – which include Columbia’s Manhattanville Expansion – Harlem Green is a sign of a neighborhood that is on a rapid upswing. Completion dates have not been posted on-site, but the building should be finished by the 2015-16 timeframe, and construction will begin in 2014.

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Posted in Architecture | Construction Update | Harlem | Harlem Green | Levenbetts | New York | Office | West Harlem

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