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Permits Filed: 100 Lenox Road, Flatbush

100 Lenox Road in June 2016, photo by Joe Strini for PropertyShark100 Lenox Road in June 2016, photo by Joe Strini for PropertyShark

Recently, green construction walls went up around an iconic detached house at the corner of Bedford Avenue and Lenox Road in Flatbush. Although it’s not the most beautiful house in the neighborhood, the two-and-a-half story home is one of several that lends an air of dignity to this stretch of Bedford in Prospect Lefferts Gardens and northern Flatbush. Now, like many standalone houses in the neighborhood, it will bite the dust for an apartment building.

Plans were filed last week to erect a seven-story apartment building there at 100 Lenox Road, a few blocks southeast of Prospect Park. The project would have 32 apartments squeezed into 21,851 square feet of residential space, yielding relatively small units averaging 680 square feet.

The cellar would have room for 15 bikes, and 1,500 square feet of amenity space would be spread between the cellar and first floor.

The developer is Moshe Tal of B.H. Tal Real Estate, which is headquartered on Kingston Avenue in Crown Heights. New Rochelle-based Bienenfeld Architecture will handle the design.

Tal scooped up the 5,500-square-foot property for $2,600,000 in October 2015, paying a hefty $118 for each square foot of the building he hopes to develop. This sizable lot would probably be even more valuable if it hadn’t been downzoned back in 2009. The new zoning kept the allowed density the same but imposed a height limit for new buildings.

The borderland between Lefferts Gardens and Flatbush is flush with development. Right next door at 2100 Bedford Avenue, an eight-story, 71-unit building is going up fast. And up the block at 111 Clarkson Avenue, two seven-story rental buildings are rising where a rambling “berserk eclectic” Victorian mansion once stood.

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13 Comments on "Permits Filed: 100 Lenox Road, Flatbush"

  1. Pretty house keeping out of the land, bye-bye and welcome an apartment on seven-story.

  2. It is very disheartening that with all the technology advances humans have made that primal greed has remained unchanged.There seems to be no appreciation / respect for the beauty of historic structures in the quest for profit. What makes a city’s appearance unique will be lost and all major cities end up looking the same.

  3. I liked the old house too. But lets be realistic, if this was so “iconic” and important to the historic fabric of the neighborhood it wouldn’t look like shit – which it does.

    • If that is the case then we should have kissed half the brownstones in Manhattan and Brooklyn goodbye since they were in disrepair (and I should say of the ones that remain because many indeed are gone). I can remember when the city was selling some for a dollar. Now – look at the cost of just a shell.

  4. Marc Leslie Kagan | August 15, 2016 at 12:35 pm |

    Here today GONE tomorrow Hey say goodbye to what makes Brooklyn Brooklyn. Once you had character now you have completely nothing you could Anyplace USA. You have NO sense of PLACE. You have destroyed all your history. You could Columbus Ohio or Houston Texas. And what for the ALL MIGHTY DOLLAR. Every building looks the same. I feel sorry for you who live in a COOKIE CUTTER neighborhood. PEOPLE JUST DON’T GIVE A SHIT!!!!

  5. I’m not against new development – but a charming house like this should be preserved.

  6. That house was allowed to become a decrepit blight on the block, which I can’t imagine lent an air of dignity to the corner for a very long time.

  7. It looks like 2 houses are fenched in. Such a beautiful place in its prime im sure. Is it fair to make more housing for the people or to preserve old world charm?

  8. Why?? Why??? Do you people keep doing this? You are tearing down landmark homes in order to build overpriced housing. And then again when I look at the name of the real estate it all makes sense.

  9. Only one house is fenced in. There used to be seven houses on that stretch of Bedford between Lenox and Caton. Now there is one remaining at Lenox near Bedford.

    Perhaps the previous owners couldn’t afford the upkeep, house rich but cash poor, and this is a common trend in Brooklyn. Can’t blame them for taking the money and running away.

  10. Gross. So gross.

  11. this property is not landmarked. it is in major disrepair, and has been neglected for decades.

  12. I grew up on Lenox bet Rogers and Nostrand and remember this house very well, it used to belong to a Dentist, Dr. Malkin…its a damn shame that they are destroying this neighbourhood, I’m sure past residents felt the same with the building booms of the 20’s 50’s and 60’s…Nevertheless nobody gives a damn about neighbourhood preservation…I remember this area the day after the 77 blackout and it was a different world back then…

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