Landmarks Designates Park Slope Historic District Extension II

Map of Park Slope Historic District Extension IIMap of Park Slope Historic District Extension II

Hundreds more buildings in Brooklyn now fall under the protection of the Landmarks Preservation Commission. On Tuesday, the LPC designated the Park Slope Historic District Extension II. Any new construction or building modifications will now have to be approved by the LPC.

The new district joins the Park Slope Historic District, designated on July 17, 1973 with 1,948 buildings, and the Park Slope Historic District Extension, designated on April 17, 2012 with 613 buildings. Also nearby is the Prospect Heights Historic District, designated on June 23, 2009.

The second extension adds 292 buildings, mostly in a cluster between St. Marks Avenue and Sterling Place, from just before 5th Avenue to just past 6th Avenue. There is another cluster between Berkeley Place and Union Street, another small cluster on Sterling Place, and two small sections along Plaza Street West.

CLICK HERE TO ENLARGE THE MAP

The district is mostly single-family rowhouses and flats constructed from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century. At the designation meeting, LPC Chair Meenakshi Srinivasan said the brownstones are the “predominant defining factor.”

While there is a lot of uniformity in the district, there is also variety, including everything from Italianate to Medieval Revival.

Included in the district is one item from the commission’s backlog – St. Augustine’s Roman Catholic Church and Rectory at 49 Sterling Place. It was built in 1888 and had been on the calendar since 1966. While it isn’t an individual landmark, it now has the protections of one as part of the historic district.

St. Augustine’s Roman Catholic Church and Rectory, 49 Sterling Place. LPC photo.

St. Augustine’s Roman Catholic Church and Rectory, 49 Sterling Place. LPC photo.

“The new Park Slope Extension is a wonderful complement to the original Park Slope Historic District and shares many of its characteristics.” said Srinivasan in a statament. “The area owes its cohesiveness to its tree-lined streets, predominant residential character and its high level of architectural integrity. We are thrilled to add this extension to the number of protected districts in Brooklyn.”

3 Comments on "Landmarks Designates Park Slope Historic District Extension II"

  1. Wow…very clear view until I can see leafs on branches, classic church and new with traffic-light.

  2. DowntownMom | April 13, 2016 at 9:24 am |

    this should piss of some developers but keeping character in the neighborhood is key to keeping its charm.

  3. Evan, a great article and you are hilarious.

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