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53 West 53rd Street


53 West 53rd Street, image by Kevin Leclerc/streetscaper

53 West 53rd Street Begins to Get Its Glass, Now Rising Into Residential Floors

After a decade of waiting, Jean Nouvel’s 53 West 53rd Street, formerly known as the Torre Verre and now known as 53W53, is finally climbing into the New York City skyline. And while the tower only stands about a dozen floors at the moment — up from only a handful when YIMBY last checked in on the site this past June — installation of its iconic cladding and glass has already begun, with the latest update thanks to YIMBY Forumer streetscaper.

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53 West 53rd Street

82-Story, 139-Unit Residential Supertall Rising At 53 West 53rd Street, Midtown

It was in September of 2015 that YIMBY last brought you a construction update on the 82-story, 139-unit supertall residential tower underway at 53 West 53rd Street, in Midtown. At the time, foundation work was well underway at the site, and now the structure is up two stories above street level, as seen in photos by Tectonic (h/t Curbed). The luxury tower, dubbed 53W53, is being designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel. Thierry Despont is designing the interiors of the residential units. The apartments will come in one- to six-bedroom configurations, and the largest listing is currently a seven-bedroom penthouse. Amenities include a pool, a library, a wine vault, a fitness center, and a lounge. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will also be located on the bottom floors of the building. Hines and Pontiac Land Group are the developers, and completion is expected in 2017.


NYC 2016 Supertalls

Why 2016 Will Be the Manhattan Skyline’s Biggest Year Ever

The rise of the supertalls has been several years in the making, and One57, 432 Park Avenue, and One World Trade Center have offered a preview of the increasingly gargantuan changes taking place across New York City. But 2016 will mark the start of a new era for the city’s skyline. With six supertalls of 300 meters (984 feet) or greater now rising, the city’s total number of such buildings will nearly double, from seven to thirteen. Yesterday, the New York Post featured YIMBY’s compilation of the towers, and today we wanted to give our own rundown on the image and its implications for our continually-changing city.

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