American Museum of Natural History Files Expansion Plans With Landmarks Preservation Commission

Museum of Natural HistoryThe proposed Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation at the American Museum of Natural History. Rendering by Studio Gang Architects

The American Museum of Natural History, located between West 77th and 81st streets on the Upper West Side, has filed plans with the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) for their expansion project, the Wall Street Journal reported. Since the museum board approved the Studio Gang Architects-designed project late last year, the proposed expansion has grown from 218,000 square feet to 235,000 square feet. Also, the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation — a ground-up six-story structure near 79th Street — has been altered to cut into only a quarter of an acre of Theodore Roosevelt Park, down from half an acre. Changes to the 2015 plans include reducing the number of trees removed from nine to seven, and demolishing three existing structures. Extensive reconfiguration work and upgrades to park space remain key elements of the project. In addition to the LPC, the Parks Department must also approve the project. Completion is tentatively expected in 2020.

The actual museum is an individual and interior landmark, and on U.S. National Register of Historic Places. In addition, the entire structure and Theodore Roosevelt Park is located within the Upper West Side/Central Park West Historic District.

American Museum of Natural History

Proposed redesign of Theodore Roosevelt Park at the American Museum of Natural History. Rendering by Reed Hilderbrand Landscape Architects via the Wall Street Journal.

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7 Comments on "American Museum of Natural History Files Expansion Plans With Landmarks Preservation Commission"

  1. With natural beautiful view and trees, green space near structure best in my favorite relaxing.

  2. That is one ugly behemoth.

  3. Pure Schlock.

  4. I only hope they fix the interior traffic flow!! ALL of the halls should connect with one another at the back rather than forcing everyone into an over-crowded front hallway…. the rear should also have elevators as this problem is the same on all floors….

  5. Gotta be a nimby on this one. What does NY need more, a history of nature or nature?

  6. Dr. Cary Goodman | September 12, 2016 at 9:11 pm |

    This plan is nothing short of toxic. It was created without the community, without any concern for its environmental impact and despite its effect of reinforcing the inequality of cultural resources in NYC.

    More than 4,000 people have signed petitions oppsing it and criticizing the allocation of $100 million in taxpayer funding for the project.

    Hopeffully, the Mayor will reject it and force the museum to start over.

  7. Cris Fernandez, RN | September 12, 2016 at 9:14 pm |

    This behemoth would adversely contribute to the health of New Yorkers by adding millions of metric tons of pollution to our already filthy air.

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