Moise Safra Cultural Center Stands Completed at 130 East 82nd Street on the Upper East Side

Rendering of Moise Safra Community Center, 130 East 82nd Street. Via PBDW Architects

Exterior work is finishing up on the Moise Safra Cultural Center, a mixed-use project designed by PBDW Architects at 130 East 82nd Street on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The 14-story building is named after the late Jewish philanthropist Moise Safra and will largely cater to Orthodox Jews of Syrian ancestry.

Recent photos from Tectonic reveal the line of five tall stone fins fully assembled, with only the ground floor awaiting some finishing touches. The rest of the curtain wall above has been substantially complete since our February update, and the sidewalk scaffolding should be removed in the coming weeks.

130 East 82nd Street. Photo by Tectonic

130 East 82nd Street. Photo by Tectonic

130 East 82nd Street. Photo by Tectonic

Though the structure only rises to a modest height, its distinctive façade with its large, intricately framed windows help set it apart from the surrounding neighborhood. The 73,000-square-foot property will contain religious and recreational facilities, event spaces, dining halls, and office suites. These spaces are suitable to host guest lectures, weddings, galas, and traditional religious programming. Two synagogues, two outdoor terraces, multiple social lounges, cafes, a library, demonstration kitchens, a swimming pool, a gym, and yoga studios round out the facility’s offerings.

The closest subways to the address are the 4, 5, and 6 trains at the 86th Street station. Also nearby are the N and Q trains, located two avenues to the east on East 86th Street.

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TFC Horizon
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2 Comments on "Moise Safra Cultural Center Stands Completed at 130 East 82nd Street on the Upper East Side"

  1. The Moise Safra Cultural Center looks pretty good! It definitely has the scheme of a cultural center, at least I think so.

  2. Do you have to prove your ancestry here at the door? Oy.

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