9 DeKalb Avenue Becomes Tallest Structure in Brooklyn

9 DeKalb Avenue. Rendering by SHoP Architects

9 DeKalb Avenue has passed a milestone in its way to becoming the first supertall skyscraper in the outer boroughs. The 93-story residential tower recently surpassed the 720-foot roof height of Brooklyn Point, giving it the title of the tallest structure in Brooklyn. Designed by SHoP Architects and developed by JDS, 9 DeKalb Avenue will stand 1,066 feet tall and yield 450 rental apartments and 150 condominiums. The site is bound by Flatbush Avenue Extension to the northeast, Fleet Street to the northwest, the landmark Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn to the southwest, and DeKalb Avenue to the south.

Recent photos show the rising hexagonal reinforced concrete superstructure growing in prominence over Downtown Brooklyn.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

The safety cocoon netting is rising with the newest formed concrete levels at a critical structural portion, a set of outrigger floors that are designed to help tie the core and perimeter of the building together. Several of these sections are spaced throughout the height of 9 DeKalb Avenue.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

A skeletal rendering of the superstructure below gives us a look at the remaining work to be done. YIMBY still anticipates that the topping off of 9 DeKalb Avenue could occur toward the end of the year, with approximately just under 350 feet left to construct. Progress on the crown and the upper outrigger floors might take some extra time given the amount of concrete and the height of this final section.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Designed by SHoP Architects

We can also see more setbacks appearing as workers make their way higher into the sky. Meanwhile, the dark-tinted floor-to-ceiling glass panels and vertical strips of stainless steel and aluminum continue to enclose the project and create a dramatic contrast of color against the surrounding office and residential skyscrapers, the stone-clad Dime Savings Bank of Brooklyn, and the skyline as a whole when viewed from afar.

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

9 DeKalb Avenue is expected to be finished sometime next year.

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17 Comments on "9 DeKalb Avenue Becomes Tallest Structure in Brooklyn"

  1. David in Bushwick | June 28, 2021 at 8:22 am | Reply

    Eat your heart out Manhattan.

    • Nice one, Brooklyn! But one down. Ten to go (and these are only the buildings currently under construction. Not proposed.)

  2. David : Sent From Heaven. | June 28, 2021 at 9:27 am | Reply

    High up to the sky on its way, and this progress has an elevated position above surrounding; sky-scraping formatting: Thanks to Michael Young.

  3. This building is already gorgeous. What a treat to see it finally rising above all its neighbors. Iconic and yet another sign that Brooklyn is a major city in its own right.

    SHoP does it right!

  4. Shane C Keena | June 28, 2021 at 10:17 am | Reply

    This is like if you combined the Chrysler Building with the MetLife Building and 111 West 57th Street. About as high as the Chrysler Building and as architecturally similar to 111 West 57th, but it has a similar visual relationship to the Dime Savings Bank as the MetLife Building does with Grand Central.

  5. Hooray! Every time it seems 9 DeKalb gets more stunning and much taller. Every view of it is so interesting and dynamic. There really is something just so magical about seeing the rise of one of the greatest buildings to ever come to the City, and especially for Brooklyn. Thank you Michael Young for sharing this magic with us.

  6. I’ve commented before about the transformation of Brooklyn. I’ll be 73 y/o in two months. It’s incredible. My uncle, who lived in the co-ops on Myrtle adjacent to the park, always told me that Bklyn would come back. He was right, but not soon enough for him to see it. I’ll be going back to the City for a visit soon. I’ll drop by Junior’s and take a look at 9 DeKalb.

  7. Is there a film on the glass? It looks kind of like vintage 70s…

  8. GC: We must assume the glass panels have a yet-to-be-removed protective plastic film coating. Those panels don’t come cheap and we don’t want them to get damaged during installation, do we?

  9. More Buildings!
    More People!
    More Density!
    More Traffic on our streets, subways and busses, etc.,
    While our fragile infrastructure
    continues to crumble.

    • All those first four items means a growing, robust city. NYC could use some of this, now. As far as infrastructure condition goes, blame the disastrous mayor (the WORST NYC’s ever seen, by far). City council, too.

  10. elliot reisman | June 29, 2021 at 3:27 pm | Reply

    the public transportation is still the same as it was in 1910 .the streets were laid out for horses and carriages

  11. In 1910, there was one subway line. And the stations were like half the size of the current stations on that line. And there was only one electrified suburban rail line. There was no Grand Central, even, and Penn was still nearing completion. There were no airports, or buses. No PABT, obviously. No PATH. So, no, the public transportation is nothing like it was in 1910.

  12. Who would want to live in a mega tall in Brooklyn?

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