Permits Filed for Transient Hotel and Community Facility at 2201 Neptune Avenue, Coney Island, Brooklyn

2201 Neptune Avenue2201 Neptune Avenue, via Google Maps

Permits have been filed for a new hotel at 2201 Neptune Avenue, in Coney Island. Guests will be ten blocks away from the D, F, N, and Q trains at the Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue Station. The building will be located right on Coney Island Creek, providing guests with views of Brooklyn, Staten Island, and the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. SWA Architecture, a Manhattan-based firm, will design the seven-story structure.

The new structure will rise to a height of 88 feet, and yield 81,500 square feet for the hotel, along with 14,000 square feet dedicated to community facilities. Underground parking will contain spots for 26 vehicles.

The permit describes 2201 Neptune Avenue as a transient hotel, and amenities include multi-purpose & conference rooms, laundry, and space for child care. In total, the project will create 194 units, with an average size of 420 square feet.

An anonymous LLC filed the permit.

Demolition permits have not been filed yet, and a completion date hasn’t been announced.

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3 Comments on "Permits Filed for Transient Hotel and Community Facility at 2201 Neptune Avenue, Coney Island, Brooklyn"

  1. Welcome Home (David) | October 17, 2017 at 6:41 am | Reply

    An abstracted obviously details. (Thank you)

  2. The term “Hotel” in the outer-boughs have become synonymous with homeless shelters. Quinn’s for profit W.I.N shelter’s are not welcomed here in Coney Island. Knowingly placing this city’s most vulnerable in a flood plan under the guise of a hotel is a severe injustice to the community and to those they allege to help.

    I may add, Coney Island is finally morphing into a sustainable neighborhood after long being neglected and abused by the top tiers of city government. Coney Island has taken in more than it’s fair share over the decades to accommodate this city’s residents whom have fallen on bad times. It’s time for other neighborhoods to step up and help out. Preferably neighborhoods whom are NOT in high risk flood plains.

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