Wood-Framed Construction Progressing at 80 Ainslie Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn

80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The redevelopment of Williamsburg from industrial wasteland to residential enclave has been a slow and relentless process, and this is particularly true around Metropolitan and Union Avenues. Permits were first filed for construction of 80 Ainslie Street in June of 2015, and now, the building’s timber frame is coming into view. Syndicate Architecture is responsible for the design.

80 Ainslie Street, image by Syndicate Architecture

80 Ainslie Street, image by Syndicate Architecture

Concern about the safety of cross-laminated timber in the instance of a fire is persistent. The great fire of London in 1666 is just one example of why this fear exists. But many in the industry are adamant that technological innovations have limited the safety issues. Thomas Robinson, head of Portland-based Lever Architecture, spoke to that concern with CBS News, citing a test performed on the material, requiring it to survive two hours inside a furnace burning at 2,000 degrees. The material is already being widely adopted, including in another project in Williamsburg, another in Newark, and another possible 1,148-foot tall tower in earthquake-prone Tokyo. The W350 Tower would cost $5.6 billion USD to build.

80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The 65-foot tall 80 Ainslie Avenue will yield 16,000 square feet, with 11,400 square feet dedicated to residential use, and 4,560 square feet for commercial-retail use. 16 apartments will be created, averaging 712 square feet apiece, indicating rentals. Eight parking spaces will be included on site. Residents will have access to a lobby, recreational terrace on the second floor, a laundry room, and bicycle storage space.

Closeup of 80 Ainslie Street

Closeup of 80 Ainslie Street

Parkview Management is responsible for the development.

80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

80 Ainslie Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Progress has been slower than initially expected, seeing how signage predicted a Summer 2018 completion, but the Williamsburg market is as hot as ever, so there is every reason to believe construction will finish by the end of the year, with move-ins promptly following.

80 Ainslie Street ground level

80 Ainslie Street ground level

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6 Comments on "Wood-Framed Construction Progressing at 80 Ainslie Street, Williamsburg, Brooklyn"

  1. Please pardon me for using your space: Construction on yours. Your love should show right here.

  2. Exactly what are the advantages of a wood structure? Reduced cost? Reduced building time? Reduced labor cost and skill levels(no iron workers)? Local sourcing?

    The fire threat doesn’t faze me. I know wood structure will only char and not collapse as would steel or concrete or aluminum. Other than bragging rights, what is it?

    Again, what’s with the external stairs? There is an elevator, right? The parking is external? Wouldn’t want a fire or gasoline explosion indoors. That would bring down the house.

    • There are lots of advantages and few disadvantages. Reduced carbon emissions, carbon sequestration, renewable materials, similar structural performance to steel. Erection labor costs are likely in line with steel erection. Timbers will char and not burn through, but there are probably additional fire protection requirements such as gypsum enclosures, sprinklers etc. There have been many studies about tall wood structures out of Europe, Canada and from SOM. This type of structure will become more common.

  3. Yay! I can’t wait for more hipsters and rich out of towners to move in and destroy what was Brooklyn. Brooklyn is dead.

  4. Hello everyone. I am new user of this forum :). I am from Hungary and my language is poor :). Thanks

  5. There is a difference between cross laminated timber construction and timber framing! This is not a CLT building!!!!

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