Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation Secures A Wave of New Leases in Former Industrial Complex

Brooklyn Navy Yard Overview, rendering courtesy the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development CorporationBrooklyn Navy Yard Overview, rendering courtesy the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Despite the anticipated slowdown of commercial real estate, Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation, or BDNYC, is reporting more than 160,000 square feet of new commercial leases within the former industrial complex. This figure does not include an additional 81,000 square feet of lease renewals and an unspecified inventory in their 2021 pipeline.

The largest transactions include a 24,481-square-foot production facility for designer jewelry retailer Catbird, a 13,200-square-foot lease to specialty contractor Smalls Electrical Construction, and a 5,800-square-foot manufacturing space leased by clothing company Storytellers & Creators, which also manufactures personal protective equipment.

“The Yard has established itself as a leading destination for cutting-edge companies attracted to our ecosystem of creative and advanced manufacturing tenants, and this momentum has continued despite the pandemic,” said Johanna Greenbaum, chief development officer at the Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation. “Now we’re excited to build on that momentum by working with one of the city’s top leasing teams to introduce two of our premier spaces to the marketplace.”

To keep up the momentum, BDNYC also announced a new partnership with CBRE, one of the country’s top commercial real estate leasing agencies. The agreement will establish CBRE as the exclusive leasing and marketing agent for a large block of creative office spaces on the top floors of Building 303 and Building 77 near the waterfront edge of Brooklyn Navy Yard.

Exterior rendering of Building 303 - Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Exterior rendering of Building 303 – Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Exterior rendering of Building 303 - Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Exterior rendering of Building 303 – Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Building 303 opened to light manufacturing and creative office tenants this fall and is part of the Admiral’s Row complex on Yard’s western edge. The building’s top floor office suite spans 50,000 square feet and includes 12-foot-tall ceilings, access to two passenger elevators, and direct access to two freight elevators.

Building 77 - Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Building 77 – Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation

Following a $187 million industrial-to-commercial renovation, Building 77 houses a mix of design and manufacturing companies, and a large food hall that is open to the public. The 70,000-square-foot divisible 15th floor boasts four private outdoor terraces and four freight elevators. The 16th floor offers roughly 8,000 square feet of interior space and 16,500 square feet of outdoor roof space well-suited for a restaurant, or event or hospitality space.

“The top floors of buildings 303 and 77 offer exactly what the city’s creative workforce will want after the pandemic: wide-open floor plates, plentiful outdoor amenity space with amazing views, a collaborative campus environment, and a location near where so much of the talent lives,” said CBRE executive vice president Brad Gerla, who will have executive oversight of the Brooklyn Navy Yard leasing team.

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8 Comments on "Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation Secures A Wave of New Leases in Former Industrial Complex"

  1. Interesting.

  2. Really nice to hear that NYC commercial real estate seems to be faring better than feared.

  3. I hope they’ll open up Washington Ave to bike and foot traffic eventually and don’t wait to do that until the Navy Yard is fully built out.

  4. I think they stopped building big ships at the Navy Yard because they no longer could fit under the bridges.

  5. We’ll need Industry City before long but it’s too late.

  6. Sheldon H Chambliss | December 15, 2020 at 11:37 am | Reply

    Get those nycha houses out of there

  7. Sheldon you can get out of there. People have been living there before you decided to.move here. They are the original brooklynites. This is our home we are not people whojust moved here. How dare you. There is working. Retired. Single parents living there. No you get out of here.

  8. Sheldon,my mother and I lived in housing. You have the good and the bad,everywhere.My aunt lived in the Fort Green houses comfortably until her last days. And so did my mom. I live now in S.C., It’s alright but I miss my Brooklyn. I went to the Sands Jr. High School,up the block of the Navy Yard. Times change and people change. If you have a complex about any N.Y.C.H.A. housing, why don’t you find an island somewhere, self-impose yourself to exile. It sounds like you think people that live in public housing are lazy,d*** addicts and the worst of the land. Well their not!!! I know plenty of people who work hard day in day out. Desent families. They work hard, to make a somewhat good living for their loved ones. Shame on you!!

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