Illuminated Public Pavilion Debuts at 300 Ashland Place in Downtown Brooklyn

Breathing Pavilion by Ekene Ijeoma - Photo by Kris GravesBreathing Pavilion by Ekene Ijeoma - Photo by Kris Graves

The outdoor plaza fronting 300 Ashland Place in Downtown Brooklyn is now home to an illuminated public sculpture for all to explore. Titled “Breathing Pavilion,” the interactive sculptures are designed by Ekene Ijeoma and form the artist’s premier public installation in New York City.

Presented in collaboration by the Downtown Brooklyn Partnership, Van Alen Institute, and Two Trees Management, the artwork comprises almost two dozen nine-foot columns arranged in a 30-foot circle. The inward-facing portions of the columns are illuminated and slowly modulate in brightness to illustrate a deep breathing technique.

In a statement from Ijeoma, Breathing Pavilion is created in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and systemic racial injustice in the United States and offers sanctuary at a time of intense hardship and loss.

Breathing Pavilion - Rendering by Ekene Ijeoma

Breathing Pavilion – Rendering by Ekene Ijeoma

View within Breathing Pavilion by Ekene Ijeoma - Photo by Kris Graves

View within Breathing Pavilion by Ekene Ijeoma – Photo by Kris Graves

Breathing Pavilion is part of Van Alen Institute’s Public Realm R&D program, intended to surface the work of emerging designers and test new strategies to bring people together in public space. Since March, the institute has coordinated a weekly series of wind and percussion solo jazz performances within the pavilion to provide a calm meditative backdrop.

The pavilion is on display through May 11.

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12 Comments on "Illuminated Public Pavilion Debuts at 300 Ashland Place in Downtown Brooklyn"

  1. Should have called it “Electric Hotdogs.”

    Why is public art universally dreadful? Why do we let so many talentless hacks mess up our public spaces?

  2. *Systematic racial injustice in the United States”? Ekene Ijeoma, you just lost me as a supporter. You know so little.

    • Not sure how you can deny there is systemic racial injustice in the US, but I am also bewildered by how this “is created in the context of systemic racial injustice “ looks like a bunch of lit up corn dogs.

  3. unfortunately, now Mark Morris Dance Group [as seen in the rendering across the street from the plaza] can no longer host community dance events in the plaza.

  4. Diane Williams | March 31, 2021 at 11:29 am | Reply

    Exactly what is this
    Comes right down to
    You don’t really need be talented
    Knowing the righ people is what this all about

  5. Arman Negahban | March 31, 2021 at 11:59 am | Reply

    Come on everyone, this isn’t that bad! It’s clearly temporary and will surely find its way onto many an influencer’s social media page during its moment in the “lime light”.

    Also, as far as I can tell, no public money was spent for this public/private plaza decoration.

  6. David : Sent From Heaven. | March 31, 2021 at 10:41 pm | Reply

    You gaze with a calm mind as I can feel, and abandon stress on its light design. Try it out, but don’t be rushed to try it: Thank you.

  7. Dreadfully pathetic

  8. I think this could be quite good. Let’s see how people interact with it.

  9. I def would like a place here I’m disabled with multiple sclerosis (MS) Don’t have Section 8 Or HUD but will be happy be here Also have in Disability $800.00 a Month pay my rent Always in time please have some consideration for me thank you.

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