Stantec Unveils Concept Design Renderings for Battery Coastal Resilience Project in Lower Manhattan

Rendering of public areas created by the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery - StantecRendering of public areas created by the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery - Stantec

Stantec has released new concept design renderings of a $129 million initiative to help protect Battery Park from rising sea levels, seasonal storm surges, and extreme precipitation. Known as the Battery Coastal Resilience Project, the investment will primarily fund reconstruction of deteriorating wharfs, enhancements to Battery Park’s existing network of public walkways, and infrastructure upgrades.

According to the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), sea levels are projected to rise 2.5 feet by 2050 and over six feet by 2100, making Lower Manhattan vulnerable to flooding not only during storms like Hurricane Sandy, but also in day-to-day scenarios. The Battery currently sits at an elevation that will be submerged as sea levels rise.

As part of the project, the wharf at the southern tip of the neighborhood will be reconstructed, raising the waterfront esplanade approximately five feet for a final elevation of 11 feet above mean sea level. The concept design renderings were first released to the public on March 24 and will continue to take shape following review by city agencies and community groups.

Groundbreaking is expected in the latter half of 2022. Stantec is serving as lead designer.

“The Battery is one of New York City’s most beloved parks, but it faces significant flooding challenges if the wharf remains at its current elevation,” said Amy Seek, design director at Stantec. “Our goal through this project is to seamlessly integrate critical infrastructure upgrades into the park, without sacrificing its sweeping views of New York Harbor, bountiful plant life, and historic features.”

Concept rendering of the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery - Stantec

Concept rendering of the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery – Stantec

Rendering of public areas created by the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery - Stantec

Rendering of public areas created by the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project in The Battery – Stantec

The Battery initiative is part of the greater Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project announced in March 2019 by the NYEDC. The project is modeled after a comprehensive environmental study that identified $500 million of recommended capital projects to increase climate resilience in Lower Manhattan. Additional components of the resiliency project focus on the Financial District, South Street, and Two Bridges.

Environmental studies and master plan adjustments are currently ongoing for all four initiatives.

Overall scope of the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project - NYEDC

Overall scope of the Lower Manhattan Coastal Resiliency Project – NYEDC

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4 Comments on "Stantec Unveils Concept Design Renderings for Battery Coastal Resilience Project in Lower Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | March 28, 2021 at 9:23 am | Reply

    A very expensive temporary bandaid. From the water, it looks like an industrial prison wall. Rock rubble and some tidal natural planting would help soften and further protect the area.

  2. It seems to me that a 50 foot wide 14 foot high perimeter park needs to be added to every borough so save the city form rising sea levels for the next 150 years. Unfortunately, it would take 120 years to build.

  3. Seriously, if the ocean levels rose 2.5′ in 30 years there would be much bigger issues than protecting Battery Park. This is much to do about nothing.

  4. Heide Fasnacht | March 30, 2021 at 8:43 pm | Reply

    The Resiliency Project stops abruptly at the North end of Battery Park City, roughly Chambers Street. It doesn’t take a genius to see that the flooding that does not happen in Battery Park City will simply overflow in to the north, flooding Tribeca, Hudson Yards and Soho. And most infuriating of all is that no one seems to notice this fatal design flaw.

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