Updated Proposals Reveal Sloped Glazing Replacement at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan

Aerial view of The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder BelleAerial view of The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder Belle

The Landmarks Preservation Commission will this week review proposals to replace The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s sloped glazing wall at the institution’s Rockefeller Wing. The museum has partnered with Beyer Blinder Belle to complete the project, which will replace deteriorating elements of the building’s glass façade.

Proposals to replace the glass wall were last presented in February 2021. This time around, the documents expand on the scope of work and glazing materials in greater detail.

Existing conditions (left) proposed glazing system (right) at The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder Belle

Existing conditions (left) proposed glazing system (right) at The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Beyer Blinder Belle

Existing conditions of sloped wall at The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder Belle

Existing conditions of sloped wall at The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Beyer Blinder Belle

The goal of the project is to create a balanced transmission of light that improves the patron experience and protects the museum’s delicate artworks and exhibits. To achieve the required conditions, the sloped wall will comprise translucent silicone LP-glazed panels arranged in the existing grid layout. The visual permeability of each panel will increase from the lowest to highest elevation, as those closer to the roof are subject to more direct sun exposure.

The panels will also improve water tightness, thermal performance, and mitigate solar heat gain.

Diagram illustrates the proposed shaded glazing system at The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder Belle

Diagram illustrates the proposed shaded glazing system at The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Beyer Blinder Belle

Physical mockups of the proposed shaded glazing system at The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Beyer Blinder Belle

Physical mockups of the proposed shaded glazing system at The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Beyer Blinder Belle

Additional members of the project team include Arup’s façade and daylighting team, building envelope repair and restoration consultants WJE, structural engineer Thornton Tomasetti, and exhibit designer wHY.

The Commission is expected to review the proposals in a virtual public meeting on Tuesday, June 1.

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5 Comments on "Updated Proposals Reveal Sloped Glazing Replacement at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | May 30, 2021 at 9:34 am | Reply

    I wish all that rooftop would get solar panels to mitigate all the power the museum uses.

  2. I do think this is needed. It is really such an eyesore, especially from the outside.

  3. So much of the museum additions over the years have not passed the test of time. The original open balconies in this space and at the Temple of Dendur have been enclosed. The Lehman Wing has serious structural cracks in its concrete beams. The Modern Art wing was poorly arranged and thought given to completely demolishing it. The idea that glass goes with anything is absurd and the transition from the McKim, Mead, & White Fifth Ave. facade is jarring, to say the least.

  4. Passed the test of time? The technology of the time of construction was used and it was as good as it got THEN! The modern wing is being addressed as I write this. If you studied the history of the additions to the rear of the Met, it was clear that the city required that the additions be unobtrusive on the park sides. There was no intention to imitate a faux McKim Meade style, ever.

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