2330 Broadway Stands Topped Out Over The Upper West Side

2330 Broadway. Designed by SLCE Architects.

The vertical pace of construction on 2330 Broadway in the past three and a half months shows a remarkable sense of progress. The reinforced concrete edifice now stands topped out at 18 stories tall and will eventually open as a senior living facility on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. Designed by SLCE Architects and developed by Welltower, Inc. and Hines, the 230-foot-tall building will yield a total of 162 residences that will be spread across 109,315 square feet, averaging 674 square feet apiece. YIMBY last reported that the supportive programming will specifically focus on providing memory care, while half of the units will be reserved for seniors with memory and cognitive disorders. Broadway 85 LLC is the owner and Hunter Robert Construction Group is the general contractor for the project, located at the corner of Broadway and West 85th Street.

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

Since YIMBY’s last update back in mid-May, the superstructure climbed from just a few floors above street level to the flat roof parapet and crown. We can see a number of workers on the main western elevation of 2330 Broadway putting together the different materials and layers of the facade. One of the floors above the sidewalk scaffolding is already fully enclosed in windows that feature dark mullions. The floor-to-ceiling square voids on the levels directly above are being lined with a blue waterproof membrane, and even further up are crews assembling narrow walls that subdivide the distance between the perimeter concrete columns into the grid we see being formed. A setback is found roughly two-thirds of the way up that gently pushes back the upper floors of the building from the sidewalks. This space will be a wrap-around landscaped terrace, as depicted in the main rendering. Meanwhile the back side has a couple of flat and blank concrete walls that indicate the core and egress shafts.

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2330 Broadway. Photo by Michael Young

2230 Broadway is depicted to be wrapped in large stone blocks on the first two levels, followed by a light-colored and warm brick surface with groups of two-story rectangular segments interspersed with dark spandrels. On top will be mechanical systems hidden from view behind black metal grilles. A canopy is shown to hang over the main entrance and sidewalks facing Broadway. Inside will be double-height amenity spaces that include a spa, a homeopathic care center, a bistro for residents, and a rooftop garden.

A completion date for 2330 Broadway is posted on the construction board for next spring.

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TFC Horizon
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6 Comments on "2330 Broadway Stands Topped Out Over The Upper West Side"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | September 12, 2021 at 9:21 am | Reply

    Beautiful buildings are everywhere in the big city, what you see here is under construction. But the shape is already very conspicuous: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. This looks promising.

    • Yes, it does. Hopefully they will be very attentive to detail in the masonry. This looks like it could be a really good-looking building.

      • Please don’t count on it happening. The speed they often employ in laying up the brickwork might preclude any careful attention to masonry detailing.

  3. Nice to see the West 80’s and 90’s finally getting some love.

  4. Somethings not quite right. The artist rendering of the proposed building show exterior windows spanning every two floors but the construction photos show window openings every floor. Was there a facade design change prior to actual construction? Frankly the building looks better with window openings every floor.

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