150 East 78th Street’s Brick and Limestone Exterior Wraps Up on Manhattan’s Upper East Side

150 East 78th Street. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

Exterior work is getting closer to completion on 150 East 78th Street, a 16-story residential building on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Designed by Robert A. M. Stern Architects and developed by Midwood Investment & Development and EJS Group, the 205-foot-tall structure will yield 25 units in three- to five-bedroom layouts spread across 68,293 square feet as well as 3,739 square feet of ground-floor retail. Ismael Leyva Architects is the executive architect and residential layout designer for the project, which is located at the corner of East 78th Street and Lexington Avenue. Sales are underway and are being handled by Compass Development Marketing Group.

Recent photos show further progress on the limestone and masonry façade since our last update in June, when the cladding had first reached the building’s pinnacle. Since then, the construction elevator has been dismantled and the gap where it was attached has begun to be filled in.

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

A handful of sections across the upper floors remain covered in black netting and metal scaffolding. The tall sidewalk scaffolding remains, but should likely be taken down in the coming weeks as the envelope nears completion. The late afternoon sun creates a soft warm glow on the hand-laid bricks and Indiana limestone blocks.

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

Almost every window is installed at this point, with only some façade work remaining on the setbacks that culminate in the brick-clad mechanical extension. This section features several dark mechanical grilles with a geometric metal framework, stone corner pedestals and parapets, and various brick running bond layouts.

150 East 78th Street. Photo by Michael Young

Robert A. M. Stern’s exquisitely detailed prewar-style architecture is best seen in the following renderings of 150 East 78th Street. The property will offer half-floor, full-floor, and duplex residences with prices beginning at $5.2 million, each with direct elevator access onto a private entry vestibule. Penthouses are slated to feature their own custom fireplaces and private outdoor terraces.

The lobby of 150 East 78th Street. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

Couturier is the designer of the eat-in kitchens, which will be finished with high-quality materials such as walnut-paneled islands, honed Statuarietto stone countertops and backsplashes, and custom polished chrome knobs and pulls. Kitchen appliances include two Miele ovens and warming drawer and Sub-Zero refrigeration, along with wine storage, a signature Lacanche Cluny or Saulieu range with gas burners, and two additional ovens that are handmade in Burgundy, France.

A typical kitchen. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

The penthouse great room. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

The penthouse master bedroom. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

Residential amenities at 150 East 78th Street include a billiards table, an en-suite catering kitchen for private gatherings, The Athletic Club with a squash court and basketball hoop, a fitness center outfitted with Technogym equipment, a private training studio, and a golf simulator. There will also be a landscaped rooftop terrace with seating and dining areas as well as a fire pit and grill, a children’s art and activity room, a pet bathing station, bike storage, cold storage, commercial washers and dryers, a 24-hour concierge, and individual storage units available for purchase.

The rooftop terrace. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

The squash court. Renderings courtesy of Hayes Davidson.

150 East 78th Street should wrap up its construction by the end of the year.

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8 Comments on "150 East 78th Street’s Brick and Limestone Exterior Wraps Up on Manhattan’s Upper East Side"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | November 6, 2021 at 8:53 am | Reply

    The rooftop terrace with private views, beautiful looking from the building. And the penthouse great room was welcoming people, who want to living on adult’s furniture: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. David in Bushwick | November 6, 2021 at 10:05 am | Reply

    I would love to see Stern delve more into Art Deco revival like the gorgeous Four Seasons Hotel. The Depression unfortunately cut short one of the best modern design eras.

    • David in Bushwick | November 6, 2021 at 11:21 am | Reply

      BTW, the floor plans for these nearly all “in contract” units are some the best and most thoughtful layouts not typically found today.

    • There certainly could’ve been an even more triumphant run in that era. It’s too bad it ended so abruptly.

  3. I love the crown so far on this one. As always, stunning.

  4. And additional ovens handmade (sorry, crafted) in France. What’s not to like about these dwellings?

  5. Really nice textures on the exterior, and beautiful windows. Maybe I could afford a closet in the mechanical extension.

  6. Something about the flatness of the facade bothers me. I feel like the windows should have been set in further, but that’s space I’m sure they didn’t want to “waste”.

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