Affordable Residential Building to Replace Our Lady of Loreto Church, 124 Sackman Street, Ocean Hill

Our Lady of LoretoPre-demolition Our Lady of Loreto at 124 Sackman Street. Photo: Nicole Bengiveno for the New York Times.

Our Lady of Loreto, an abandoned church owned by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn and located at 124 Sackman Street in Ocean Hill, is expected to be demolished to make way for an affordable residential building. Catholic Charities Progress of Peoples Development Corporation, which leases the property, is behind the project, the New York Times reported. New building applications haven’t yet been filed, but demolition permits were back in June and crews are expected to begin work later this year. When the church originally closed back in 2008, the structure came close to being razed for 88 affordable residential units. An agreement was made to build 64 residential units behind it while converting the church structure into a different use. Since the 2010 agreement, Catholic Charities hasn’t been able to recruit a redevelopment team to convert the property. The site, located at the corner of Pacific and Sackman streets, is five blocks from Broadway Junction stop on the the A, C, J, L, and Z trains.

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Dahlia Horizon
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7 Comments on "Affordable Residential Building to Replace Our Lady of Loreto Church, 124 Sackman Street, Ocean Hill"

  1. Church is going away from land, and building for rental ready to in stead on a new construction.

  2. I’m not religious, but this is a damn shame!

  3. Very disappointed, what a beautiful building.

  4. Marc Leslie Kagan | August 17, 2016 at 11:46 pm |

    The GREED of some people is amazing.

  5. Heaven hath no fury as a church demolished by greed!

  6. I went to Our Lady of Loretto school and church as a child…such a beautiful church and building..so sad to see it go…..

  7. ex brooklynite | November 2, 2016 at 6:34 pm |

    The Sackman Street area was the last hold out of Italian Americans in Brownsville into the mid 1970s.

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