Reveal for Robert A.M. Stern-Designed Tower Planned for 14 Fifth Avenue, Greenwich Village

14 Fifth Avenue14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The blocks of Greenwich Village are perhaps the most difficult spot for new development in all of New York City, but according to a tipster, that hasn’t gotten in the way of Madison Realty Capital’s plans to put a new tower at 14 Fifth Avenue, between West 8th and West 9th Streets. Plans have been created for the site by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, and while they have yet to receive approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, the new building would be both prominent, and attractive.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Plans show the tower would rise 367 feet and 27 floors to its rooftop parapet, which in this iteration, is crowned by substantial ornamentation. At first glance the design may appear uncharacteristically tall, especially for Greenwich Village, but in reality, One Fifth Avenue directly across the street stands 340′ to its rooftop.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue

Unfortunately, nothing approaching the neighborhood’s surrounding density or scale has been allowed to rise in the past few decades, as local NIMBYs have consolidated enough political control to put the kibosh on almost any development, period. Nevertheless, YIMBY has heard that Madison Realty Capital is on the verge of construction, and that the LPC hearing should be relatively soon.

The total residential floor area in the current version is 89,812 square feet, and there will be 36 condominiums in all. Floors 2 through 13 will each be split between two units (except for the ninth floor, which will only have one), and all levels above 13 will contain full-floor residences, with two duplexes spanning floors 24 to 25, and 26 to 27.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The exterior will feature limestone from head to toe, and the historically-inspired accents ensure the building meshes with the predominantly pre-war surrounds almost seamlessly. With Robert A.M. Stern’s penchant for classical design, and recent projects like 220 Central Park South and 30 Park Place going above and beyond to enhance both streetscape and skyline, the LPC will hopefully be relatively satisfied with the plans upon submission.

No exact completion date has been announced yet.

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