Reveal for Robert A.M. Stern-Designed Tower Planned for 14 Fifth Avenue, Greenwich Village

14 Fifth Avenue14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The blocks of Greenwich Village are perhaps the most difficult spot for new development in all of New York City, but according to a tipster, that hasn’t gotten in the way of Madison Realty Capital’s plans to put a new tower at 14 Fifth Avenue, between West 8th and West 9th Streets. Plans have been created for the site by Robert A.M. Stern Architects, and while they have yet to receive approval from the Landmarks Preservation Commission, the new building would be both prominent, and attractive.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

Plans show the tower would rise 367 feet and 27 floors to its rooftop parapet, which in this iteration, is crowned by substantial ornamentation. At first glance the design may appear uncharacteristically tall, especially for Greenwich Village, but in reality, One Fifth Avenue directly across the street stands 340′ to its rooftop.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue

Unfortunately, nothing approaching the neighborhood’s surrounding density or scale has been allowed to rise in the past few decades, as local NIMBYs have consolidated enough political control to put the kibosh on almost any development, period. Nevertheless, YIMBY has heard that Madison Realty Capital is on the verge of construction, and that the LPC hearing should be relatively soon.

The total residential floor area in the current version is 89,812 square feet, and there will be 36 condominiums in all. Floors 2 through 13 will each be split between two units (except for the ninth floor, which will only have one), and all levels above 13 will contain full-floor residences, with two duplexes spanning floors 24 to 25, and 26 to 27.

14 Fifth Avenue

14 Fifth Avenue, image by Robert A.M. Stern Architects

The exterior will feature limestone from head to toe, and the historically-inspired accents ensure the building meshes with the predominantly pre-war surrounds almost seamlessly. With Robert A.M. Stern’s penchant for classical design, and recent projects like 220 Central Park South and 30 Park Place going above and beyond to enhance both streetscape and skyline, the LPC will hopefully be relatively satisfied with the plans upon submission.

No exact completion date has been announced yet.

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21 Comments on "Reveal for Robert A.M. Stern-Designed Tower Planned for 14 Fifth Avenue, Greenwich Village"

  1. Welcome Home (David) | October 27, 2017 at 8:19 am | Reply

    Number Design: Now I have the latest inspirations for you and I telling you if you get bored serious faces of Trump please turn to world of development for example; 1’s corner – 2’s corner – 3’s corner – 4’s corner – 5’s corner – 6’s corner – 7’s corner – 8’s corner – 9’s corner – 10’s corner. (11: Think and think until you can catch its difference for new future and the time is over I have to go back my grave – I love you YIMBY – Thank you so much) ((^_^))

  2. Unfortunate.

  3. Attractive???

    Did Madison Reality write this press release? People move to the village to avoid monstrosities like this. This isn’t fitting with the neighborhood and the building is out of scale with itself. It’s too tall for the width of the site.

    Hopefully Landmarks rightfully shuts this down.

  4. BTFO Stern!

  5. LOVE IT! One Fifth Avenue needs this as a magnificent compliment. And with Robert A. M. Stern designing it, what’s not to love. The NIMBYS would greatly hurt their (selfish) cause if they try to derail this.

    • The NIMBY’s seem to have done pretty well looking out for their “(selfish)” cause so far. That stretch of Fifth is widely considered one of the most desirable pockets of the City and their property values reflect that.

  6. What about the 23 story, 280 foot tower rising on what was once the Bowlmor site? That wasn’t blocked by local NIMBYs.

    • The Bowlmor site is not in a historic district, so there wasn’t a foothold to slow things down, since the project conforms to existing zoning for the (huge) lot.

      • Understood, but the article states that “nothing approaching the neighborhood’s surrounding density or scale has been allowed to rise in the past few decades, as local NIMBYs have consolidated enough political control to put the kibosh on almost any development, period.”

        That’s what I’m contesting.

  7. So, I have no position on this project right now, but two points: The height of One Fifth is not the relevant point: that building steps back severely starting at about half-way up and is really just a slender spire for the top 20%. Stern’s proposal, at nearly 3 stories taller, makes only figurative gestures at such step-backs. To note height without reference to bulk is deceptive.

    Also, I’m not understanding the argument from boosters that One Fifth needs “a complement.” That building is so striking precisely because it stands alone. For many years it was the epitome of the original aesthetic of skyscrapers-solitary spires rising from the foothills of low-rise buildings. Two Fifth compromised that some, but the contrast of styles still left One Fifth striking. Whether 14 Fifth is a good design is something people can have honest debate around. But the notion that its addition will some how complete or improve One Fifth is risible.

  8. Looks like a stalking horse to get a compromise less (but still) overbuilt plan

    • Agree, I think the parapet will be sacrificed and they will match One Fifth’s 340′. That would actually improve the design, as well.

      • There is no way this thing gets to 340′. Or anything with a 3 in front of it. They’ll be lucky if they get 250′ with setbacks.

        You need to study historic districts a little more. At 340′ this thing dominates the entire central village. You’ve got a better chance of hell freezing over before this thing gets built at anywhere close to its current incarnation.

  9. Not happy to read about this. Fifth Avenue by Eighth is way too slow already, particularly with road work still being done on Waverly. This will be taller than anything else in the neighborhood, 30 feet taller than One Fifth and way taller than 20 Fifth, which is a lovely Goldman-owned rental next door to the site. On the other hand, that block is notably crappier than the others at the Fifth and 8th/9th intersections so maybe a hish-pish Robert Stern building will elevate everyone’s value once it’s done. Of course, Landmarks and the Community Board will have their say so who knows what’ll end up there when.

  10. Looks ready for the next GHOSTBUSTERS.

  11. In the 19th century, statues of nude women were acceptable as long as they made reference to Greek or Roman art. Now here we have a “classical” temple on top of a building that reaches 367 feet into the Greenwich Village sky. Does that make a neighborhood-changing building acceptable?

  12. “Nevertheless, YIMBY has heard that Madison Realty Capital is on the verge of construction, and that the LPC hearing should be relatively soon.”

    What does this mean? You know the process almost better than anyone.

    You cant get construction permits before landmarks approval. And this will clearly not be approved by Landmarks in its current form, and require significant reworking by the architect. And probably months of back and forth.

    Construction by middle of 2018? Maybe.

  13. “The Mausoleum” is an elegant new tower designed by Robert AM Stern in a style for those who love cemeteries, ghostly allusions, and futuristic odes to the 1980s.

  14. SO BAD. Is Bob Stern trying to resurrect POMO? Maybe he should do it in polished pink marble to really seal the deal, with oversized capitals in polished brass. But no, I guess to make it contemporary it’d be precast concrete.

    And how does RAMSA still have anyone working for them? Maybe they’ll be building the Temple of Dionysus on top using 3D modeling drones. What a gimmick!

  15. 14 Fifth Avenue was once 14 and 16 With Ave, elegant brownstone townhouses built in about 1940 by the Brevoort family for their daughters. !0 and 12 were part of the row. 12 was rebuilt in about 1915 and stands today as it was built. 14 and 16 were combined and stripped of all architectural features long before the LPC came into being. The classic front stoops were replaced by a single ignominious basement level entrance into 14. In the interior, most of the floors retain most of their original features, including 15 foot ceilings, ornamental plaster crown moldings and medallions, Italian marble fireplace surrounds and more. The demolition of these two historic houses leaves #10 the only survivor of the four sisters. It is my hope that the LPC will take these facts into consideration as they deliberate on the Stern application for what can only be described as monstrous.

  16. Cookie cutter Stern.
    A cut and paste version of all their recent projects.
    What’s the point of LPC if this type of building can happen in a historic district.
    Shame.

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