YIMBY Visits 15 Hudson Yards as Work Wraps on The Vessel and Public Square

15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

It’s been over five years since groundbreaking occurred for the Hudson Yards mega-development. Today, phase one appears all but complete, and is increasingly hard to miss on the overall Manhattan skyline. Stretching over 26 acres and costing $25 billion, the full site will become the largest planned development in the country’s history.

The Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

At street level, the gardens will open up to the public later next year. The buildings will follow suit soon after. Not much time is left before the freshly minted neighborhood begins to buzz with pedestrian activity, and last week, YIMBY toured 15 Hudson Yards and the public square to see the progress made on-site.

Art on the Plaza piece by Jon Burgerman

Art on the Plaza piece by Jon Burgerman

We visited on a pleasant day, and found several art installations around 10 Hudson Yards to have engaged and attracted plenty of foot traffic.

Art on the Plaza piece by Yoko Ono

Art on the Plaza piece by Yoko Ono

That includes the “Prelude To The Shed”, and an “Art on the Plaza” program that currently exhibits two interactive pieces by Yoko Ono and Jon Burgerman.

Image from the rooftop of 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Image from the rooftop of 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

After years of waiting for the historic development to rise, it’s exciting to get to visit the top of 15 Hudson Yards. Amazingly, only the first phase of the site is nearing completion. The train yard to its west will soon host seven additional buildings spanning another 6.22 million square feet, along with an expansion to the public gardens.

Hudson Yards' Master Plan

Hudson Yards’ Master Plan

Phase one consists of six towers, the Shed, and a five-acre public square.

10 Hudson Yards seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

10 Hudson Yards seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

10 Hudson Yards has been open for business since 2016, the site for 50 Hudson Yards is being rapidly excavated, three towers are nearly topped out, and 30 Hudson Yards is settling into its role as Manhattan’s sharpest crown jewel. Both 10 and 30 Hudson Yards were designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates.

15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The 88-story 15 Hudson Yards peaks 910 feet above ground, creating 285 market-rate condominiums and 106 affordable housing units. Diller Scofidio + Renfro has worked with the Rockwell Group to design the project. Related Companies and Oxford Properties Group are responsible for the development.

Looking toward the remaining exposed train yard, as well as future location of the shared resident's terrace space, image from 15 Hudson Yards by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking toward the remaining exposed train yard, as well as the future shared resident’s terrace space, image from 15 Hudson Yards by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The tower is most unique for its curved four-leaf-clover crown. With the tower topped-out and the façade just five levels away from completion, the indentations are becoming increasingly pronounced.

One Manhattan West from 15 Hudson Yards rooftop, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan West from 15 Hudson Yards rooftop, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

From the rooftop of 15 Hudson Yards, One Manhattan West looks particularly tall. The superstructure has grown several floors above 15 Hudson Yards’ 910-foot tall vantage point, on its way toward a 995-foot tall pinnacle. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP are responsible for designing the office building, with Brookfield leading Manhattan West’s development.

35 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

35 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

35 Hudson Yards is the second supertall in the area to be designed by the 82-year old SOM. There has been no significant progress since our last update in early May. The next update will come with the tower’s topping out, which should be soon. It will imminently rise 1,009 feet, and yield 1.05 million square feet for commercial offices, hotel rooms, and residential apartments.

30 Hudson Yards from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

30 Hudson Yards from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The tallest tower of the lot, the site’s equivalent of a steeple, has some interesting characteristics when observed from above. From 15 Hudson Yards, 30 Hudson Yards almost blends into its surroundings thanks to the reflective curtainwall.

30 Hudson Yards' Observation Deck seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

30 Hudson Yards’ Observation Deck seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The observation deck is nearly complete, with just a couple sections awaiting installation. That includes the glass floor. The structure still awaits topping out, but there’s not much room left to grow.

Downtown Manhattan and Jersey from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Downtown Manhattan and Jersey from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking to the south, 15 Hudson Yards has one of the best angles from any tower to compare the scale of Lower Manhattan with New Jersey.

Lower Manhattan from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Lower Manhattan from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The recent wave of skyscraper construction has slowed down for Lower Manhattan, following the topping out of 3WTC and 111 Murray, both of which are quite prominent from most viewpoints to the north.

Midtown View from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Midtown View from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking toward 57th Street, 220 CPS appears almost finished, Central Park Tower is rocketing to its record-setting pinnacle, 111 West 57th Street is now rising above the 756-foot tall Carnegie Tower, and 53W53 remains all-but-topped out.

One Manhattan Square seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan Square seen from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Meanwhile, way over by the Manhattan Bridge, One Manhattan Square is quietly being sealed up. As façade work moves upward, the development is settling into its role as the beacon of the Lower East Side. Check out our visit to OMS to read more about it.

The Shed and the Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Shed and the Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The entire development has been designed to entice the rest of the city and world to want to visit. This is perhaps best exemplified by Vessel, a futuristic 150-foot tall free-to-access public landmark that has not been value-engineered. Heatherwick Studio, responsible for the design, described the piece as, “one of the most complex pieces of steelwork ever made.”

Base of the Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Base of the Vessel, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

With a price tag estimated to be around $200 million, it’s intended to be the centerpiece that attracts and amazes people. It’s a rare example of architecture from our era whose sole purpose is to inspire awe from everyone. The structurally painted steel is covered by polished copper-colored steel skin that resists oxidization, meaning the color will remain vibrant for a long time.

Close to the base, Vessel’s 50-foot diameter appears shockingly narrow. From the bottom, it quickly flowers outward, expanding to a diameter of 150 feet up at the top.

The surrounding gardens will house over 28,000 plants, and 200 matured trees, woodland plants, and perennials. Once finished, nearly a mile of garden seating walls will provide for the enormous flow of individuals expected for the area. Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects are responsible for the landscaping design.

The Shed, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Shed, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Shed is a $500 million six-story cultural center connected to the gardens and the High Line. It will be New York City’s first and only arts center dedicated to commissioning, producing, and presenting new work in a plethora of art genres, including performing arts, visual arts, and pop culture events.

Seating capacity ranges from 1,250 to 3,000 individuals and is connected to a 30,000 square foot exhibition space. The building is one of the most futuristic additions to the neighborhood, as the exposed steel diagrid encasement for the public space is an eight million pound movable shell on a track. Diller Scofidio + Renfro joined with Rockwell Group in designing the space. CEO Alex Poots is the Artistic Director. It is expected to open to the public in spring of 2019.

As for Fifteen Hudson Yards, occupancy is expected by the end of the year.

Subscribe to YIMBY’s daily e-mail

Follow
 the YIMBYgram for real-time photo updates
Like YIMBY on Facebook
Follow YIMBY’s Twitter for the latest in YIMBYnews

.

5 Comments on "YIMBY Visits 15 Hudson Yards as Work Wraps on The Vessel and Public Square"

  1. Please pardon me for using your space: Chic views on high progress by Andrew Nelson. (Thanks to you)

  2. “public landmark that has not been value-engineered” is the most timely quote of our time, relating to the built environment, today.

  3. Hudson Yards is kind of mind-blowing.

  4. Howard Miller | June 2, 2018 at 5:20 pm | Reply

    Yes, the views from the higher floors will be jaw dropping…and yes, the Vessel, Shed, the shopping mall, the High Line Park, and even the street level park all appear to offer a spectacular and welcome addition to the city.

    But yowsa…is the overall architecture (apart from the Vessel and Shed, of course) not just disappointing, it’s pretty much downright awful when compared to what’s seen in 21st supertalls elsewhere around the world.

    Oh, sure the exteriors on a couple of buildings turned out better than feared, especially when compared to the appallingly (F)ugly 30 Hudson Yards, but still when taken together in terms of architectural grace and beauty, one cannot be helped but wondering “is that all there is?”

    Sorry, YIMBY, but if this is the best we can do for NEW YORK CITY, which likes to bill itself as the “Capital of the World”, then our best days in terms of architecture are surely, and sadly, behind us. 🙁

  5. Howard Miller | June 2, 2018 at 5:21 pm | Reply

    That’s “21st century supertalls” in the above!

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.


*