Future Look At Midtown’s Supertall Skyline Circa 2022

Central Park view in 2022, rendering by Jose Hernandez image by Andrew Campbell NelsonCentral Park view in 2022, photograph by Andrew Campbell Nelson, rendering by Jose Hernandez for the Skyscraper Museum

There are few places better than Central Park to truly appreciate the scale of New York City. The cliff-like transition from Midtown to Olmsted’s masterpiece is part of what attracts people to the city, and it’s only getting more dramatic. Today YIMBY has a fresh rendering by Jose Hernandez, based on a photograph by Andrew Campbell Nelson from the Met’s Rooftop Garden, which reveals exactly how the skyline is expected to change through 2022 and currently appears in an exhibit at The Skyscraper Museum, in Lower Manhattan.

Central Park view in 2018, rendering by Jose Hernandez image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Central Park view in 2018, photography by Andrew Campbell Nelson, rendering by Jose Hernandez for the Skyscraper Museum

Unlike most renderings focused on an individual project, this showcases eleven different towers under construction. The rest of this article will review each building visible in the rendering.

Central Park view in 2022 with labels, rendering by Jose Hernandez image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Central Park view in 2022 with labels, photography by Andrew Campbell Nelson, rendering by Jose Hernandez for the Skyscraper Museum

138 East 50th Street, as seen in the image, while nearly half a mile from the Central Park South border, still manages to make its presence known over Central Park. Designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli, the 63-story tower will barely pierce the Midtown Plateau. The 800-foot tall structure yields 250,000 square feet, including 124 condominiums and 4,600 square feet of retail. Completion is expected by the end of the year. Ceruzzi Properties is responsible for the development.

Next is, 425 Park Avenue, an office building designed by Norman Foster + Partners. The development is infamously and perhaps best know it for what it isn’t, the design submitted by Zaha Hadid Architects and what would have been the late architect’s first skyscraper in New York City. Developer L&L Holding Company decided in favor of Foster’s design, which is notable for its setbacks and the three decorative fins at the pinnacle.

520 Park Avenue

520 Park Avenue, rendering via teaser site

520 Park Avenue is a 51-story, 780-foot tall residential condominium tower designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects. The building has already begun sales for its 34 condominium, the most notable sale so far featuring a $70 million duplex bought by a Las Vegas billionaire. Zeckendorf Development is responsible for the project.

One Vanderbilt, photo by Andrew Nelson rendering by Jose Hernandez

By 2022, One Vanderbilt will be visible just above the 705-foot tall General Motors building. The 1,401 foot tall, 58-story building has been making incredible progress, with the superstructure now over thirty floors above ground. Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF) is responsible for the design, with metallic-toned terracotta paneling slated to cover the exterior. SL Green is responsible for the development.

53 West 53rd Street

53 West 53rd Street, rendering by VUW Studio

One of the most highly anticipated buildings of the recent boom is 53 West 53rd Street. Designed by Jean Nouvel Architects, the 1,050 foot tall tower has now topped out, and the façade is all but complete. Completion of the 145 condominiums is expected next year, along with the major MoMA expansion. Hines, Pontiac Land Group, and Goldman Sachs are responsible for the development.

111 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

111 West 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

111 West 57th Street, once topped out, will be the second tallest building overlooking Central Park, as well as the second tallest building by rooftop height, rising 1,428 feet tall compared with 1WTC’s rooftop height of 1,368 feet. The tower as planned will be the skinniest skyscraper in the world, with a width-to-height ratio of 1:23. Having recently reached the 1,000-foot milestone, there is only 400 left before it will top out. While the park-side façade is not unique, its terracotta and bronze cladding on the East and West faces have brought the building critical acclaim, and should make it one of the City’s best designs in recent history. JDS Development and Property Markets Group are responsible for the project, with SHoP Architects responsible for the design. The 82-story building will create 60 condominiums.

Central Park Tower from 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Central Park Tower from 57th Street, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Rising 1,550 feet above the street, Central Park Tower will soon top out as the tallest building in the city by rooftop height. Extell Development is responsible for the project, with Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture as the design architects. Rottet Studio is responsible for interiors, and Adamson Associates are the architect of record. Topping out is expected next year, with completion by 2020. The building will create 179 condominiums and a 300,000 square foot Nordstrom’s flagship.

220 Central Park South, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

220 Central Park South, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Nearly complete, and topped out for some time, 220 Central Park South acts as the aesthetic counterweight against the curtain walls of its immediate contemporaries. Following One57 and 432 Park Avenue, it was the third recent residential skyscraper of near-supertall heights to rise along 57th Street and into the skyline. 116 condominiums will be created. Vornado Realty Trust is responsible for the development, with SLCE Architects as the architect of record. Completion is expected by the end of the year.

50 Hudson Yards

50 Hudson Yards, along Tenth Avenue. Credit: Related-Oxford

Last is Hudson Yards. Visible right between 220CPS and the Hearst Tower is 30 Hudson Yards, designed by KPF, and 50 Hudson Yards, designed by Foster + Partners. Excavation is already underway for the 1,011-foot tall 50 Hudson Yards, and it is expected to be complete by 2022. Related is responsible for both developments.

Central Park view in 2022, rendering by Jose Hernandez image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Central Park view in 2022, photography by Andrew Campbell Nelson, rendering by Jose Hernandez for the Skyscraper Museum

The rendering by Jose Hernandez and Andrew Campbell Nelson is on view now at the Skyscraper Museum as part of a recently-opened Skyline exhibition, open through January 2019.

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