YIMBY Tours Extell’s One Manhattan Square as Move-Ins Loom & Distant Supertalls Soar

1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Among New York’s current major developers, Extell has perhaps the most notable portfolio when it comes to sheer height. Though Central Park Tower may become the tallest building in Manhattan by roof and Brooklyn Point will do the same for that borough, the firm’s penchant for prominence is best visualized through One Manhattan Square, aka OMS, which sticks out of its underbuilt neighborhood fabric like the Lower East Side’s own version of the Eiffel Tower. The skyscraper topped-out in September of 2017, but installation of the façade only wrapped this month. Last week, YIMBY took a tour of the building’s penthouse residences and sales gallery, and today we have a look at its almost-finished exterior, as well as an update on the ever-changing views from the top.

1 Manhattan Square as seen from the Lower East Side, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1 Manhattan Square as seen from the Lower East Side, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

OMS is something of an outlier for contemporary New York City. While there are certainly taller buildings, few that stand so monolithically. The tower is hard to miss. It is out of context in a way this city has not seen since the 1920’s and 30’s, when skyscrapers like the Woolworth, Chrysler Building, and the Empire State Building provided similar optics, before their surroundings also bloomed to correspond with their newfound grandeur.

The Woolworth Building from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Woolworth Building from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan Square is directly across from the Manhattan Bridge, and beyond its impact on the skyline, the tower will add a significant stock of housing to the NYC market.

1501 Voohries as seen from 1 Manhattan Square

1501 Voohries as seen from 1 Manhattan Square

In this regard, the building does share commonality with 1501 Voorhies, in Sheepshead Bay. While the scale is not identical, the 30-story building has added 180 units to its own market. The building can be seen from OMS, far in the distance.

1 Manhattan Square model base, showing the meandering walkway and roundabout vehicular entrance, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1 Manhattan Square model base, showing the meandering walkway and roundabout vehicular entrance, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The 847-foot tall structure will yield 1,260,000 square feet, including 25,516 square feet of retail, over 100,000 square feet of amenities for the residents, 815 condominiums, and 205 affordable rental units in an adjacent structure. This will do little by itself to address the hundreds of thousands of citizens who need affordable housing, but it is still a major and important step forward for this neighborhood.

Looking North from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking North from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

There is no view of the city quite like the view from this building. The penthouse view of Midtown shows off the mountainous nature of the skyline. The structures build up from Union Square toward Central Park, with only the Empire State Building and 432 Park Avenue sticking out of that crowd, at least for the moment.

Midtown view of Central Park Tower, One57, 111w57 behind 53w53, a bit of the George Washington Bridge, and 1 Vanderbilt, from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Midtown view of Central Park Tower, One57, 111w57 behind 53w53, a bit of the George Washington Bridge, and 1 Vanderbilt, from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Hudson Yards and Manhattan West from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Hudson Yards and Manhattan West from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Hudson Yards is a totally different matter. The curtain wall facades, particularly from 10HY and 30HY, as designed by KPF, contrast strongly with the surrounding neighborhoods. Assuming the gradients of the sky, and resembling the tone of the Hudson River, the towers have an ethereal quality that resonates nicely with their position.

FiDi and the NYC Harbor from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

FiDi and the NYC Harbor from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

HMS Queen Elisabeth, visiting the NYC Harbor as seen from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

HMS Queen Elisabeth, visiting the NYC Harbor as seen from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking towards the harbor, OMS again has a totally unique view. Seen in the distance during YIMBY’s visit was the HMS Queen Elisabeth, which has graced the New York Harbor for this last week, stationed between Red Hook and Staten Island.

Brooklyn Point, the soon-to-be tallest tower in the borough, also developed by Extell 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Brooklyn Point, the soon-to-be tallest tower in the borough, also developed by Extell 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking across the East River, Extell’s Brooklyn Point tower can be seen rising steadily. As we have recently covered, the building is getting pieces of façade up quickly.

Manhattan Bridge as seen from the 24th floor at 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Manhattan Bridge as seen from the 24th floor at 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

And in case if you’re worried that the only good views are from the Penthouse, the lower floors do not disappoint. Perhaps the best views of Brooklyn and the Manhattan Bridge are from lower down. The view of the bridge above was captured from the 24th Floor.

Sales Gallery entrance for 1 Manhattan Square as designed by West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Sales Gallery entrance for 1 Manhattan Square as designed by West 8 Urban Design & Landscape Architecture, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The off-site sales gallery shows off the welcoming interiors one can look forward to in the building. A walk through the West 8-designed gallery shows off what Meyer Davis will eventually do for the interior design inside the tower. Davis states that his goal for OMS is to place emphasis on the style, quality, and functionality. This translates to beautiful marble tile countertops and brushed bronze shelving, tiles, and hardwood.

1 Manhattan Square model, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1 Manhattan Square model, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Also on view at the sales gallery is a scale model of the tower, complete with a lighting feature and a landscaped base showing off the meandering walkway, the faux-tree house, and roundabout in front of the main lobby.

1 Manhattan Square Sales Gallery mock-up kitchen and living space, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1 Manhattan Square Sales Gallery mock-up kitchen and living space, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Listings have already started for the unit, with move-ins expected by 2019. A one-bedroom unit will cost around $1.2 million, $4.4 million for a larger floor plate. A 3,700 square foot 5-bed terraced duplex has already been sold in the building for a total of $13 million.

1 World Trade Center from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1 World Trade Center from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Lendlease is behind the construction, with Adamson Associates Architects responsible for the design.

Midtown View from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Midtown View from 1 Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The completion of OMS is looming just around the corner, expected in 2019. Installation of the lobby has already commenced. Closings on the condominiums will start in early 2019, followed quickly by move-ins.

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