LPC Rejects Proposals for Seven-Story Structure at 171 Calyer Street in Greenpoint, Brooklyn

171 Calyer Street - PKSB Architects171 Calyer Street - PKSB Architects

Proposals for a new mixed-use residential development in Greenpoint, Brooklyn received a thumbs down from the local Community Board and the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). As presented by PKSB Architects, the seven-story building at 171 Calyer Street would have comprised 70,171 square feet.

Proposed components included 5,615 square feet of retail area at the ground level and 33 residential units positioned on floors two through seven. The façade of the building is comprised of red brick from the ground level to the fifth floor and light gray metal paneling at the sixth and seventh levels.

171 Calyer Street - PKSB Architects

171 Calyer Street – PKSB Architects

171 Calyer Street - PKSB Architects

171 Calyer Street – PKSB Architects

The LPC argued that the presented structure was too massive in comparison to surrounding buildings and vehemently rejected the proposed metal cladding at the upper levels.

The development would have replaced an existing single-story structure that once functioned as a supermarket and a fitness center. It remains to be seen how the project team will respond to criticisms from the community board and the LPC.

Site map of proposed development at 171 Calyer Street - PKSB Architects

Site map of proposed development at 171 Calyer Street – PKSB Architects

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4 Comments on "LPC Rejects Proposals for Seven-Story Structure at 171 Calyer Street in Greenpoint, Brooklyn"

  1. David in Bushwick | February 15, 2020 at 10:00 am | Reply

    Too massive? There are several nearby buildings as tall as the street front of this proposal. This is true unnecessary NIMBYism.

  2. It’s taller than most of its surroundings, but it’s a quality design and better than what’s there now.

  3. It looks like every other generic boring building theyve been putting up for the past 15 years.

  4. It’s a given that buildings in the historical district should be preserved, and any new buildings need to fit in to what is already there. The proposed new building adheres to those requirements with a well-thought-out proposal.

    Replacing a one story former gym, the facade of the new building exactly matches the brickwork of many of the surrounding residential buildings (that upper metal clad portion, which is respectfully & tastefully setback, can easily be changed in terms of suitable materials).Furthermore the long portion of the new building on quiet residential Lorimer St not only exactly matches adjacent building brickwork but also exactly matches the three story height of the existing buildings there —while the five story height along more bustling Calyer St exactly matches the new construction/renovation across the street (which was formerly a modern-day IT center addition for the adjacent historic Greenpoint Savings Bank). The huge dome of the still existing historic Greenpoint Savings bank is far higher & bulkier than the slim seven story setback of the new building that will be about 500 feel away.
    All in all this is a fine residential addition to the neighborhood that, with some minor modifications, will fit into the historic district’s aesthetics without overpowering it.

    However , like most new construction it will likely be unaffordable to most residents of Greenpoint , and will serve to accelerate the rampant greed-fueled gentrification & rising rents (both business & residential) that are destroying the neighborhood’s viability for long time residents & businesses.
    It will serve the interestd of fly-by-night developers, not the fundamnetal interests of this neighborhood, its renter residents, and its businesses.
    The developers come in and say:”Hey, we like the place. It has potential. We can make money here. Now get out!”.
    Change is inevitable, but the gentrified destruction of stable & attractive neighborhoods like Greenpoint is not and cannot be acceptable in this city.
    Truly affordable housing needs to be our priority –and that should be an essential part of this building proposal.

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