YIMBY Visits Lower Manhattan’s Crowning Residential Penthouse at 30 Park Place

30 Park Place from the 125 Greenwich Sales Gallery 1WTC, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson30 Park Place from the 125 Greenwich Sales Gallery 1WTC, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

For the sunset article on YIMBY’s week of skyline updates, today we have the views from 30 Park Place, the tallest residential tower in Lower Manhattan, positioned between the northern edge of the Financial District and Tribeca.

Sunset over Jersey from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Sunset over Jersey from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Opened in 2016, the Robert A.M. Stern Architects-designed building has made a huge splash on the market. 30 Park Place’s slender profile has subtly influenced the skyline in a look that has been nearly-identically reproduced in Midtown, at 220 Central Park South. The tower has a marketing floor count of 82, and exemplifies Stern’s iconic blend of 1930’s style with minimalist restraint.

Model of the 30 Park Place crown, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Model of the 30 Park Place crown, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Silverstein is responsible for the development.

The Oculus from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Oculus from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The recent completion of the Oculus that crowns the World Trade Center Transportation Hub epitomizes the neighborhood’s rebirth. 30 Park Place is another feather in the cap of the area’s revitalization following the reconstruction of the World Trade Center.

Shared lounge at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Shared lounge at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

30 Park Place resident lobby, image courtesy Silverstein

30 Park Place resident lobby, image courtesy Silverstein

30 Park Place is a blend of residential and hotel, and both components have their own lobbies. The hotel lobby is energetic, with people constantly moving in and out. By comparison, the residential lobby’s strikingly black-and-white decoration evokes tranquility.

Interior of shared lounge space at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Interior of shared lounge space at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The hotel-condominium mix at 30 Park Place does come with benefits for the owners. Owning a unit comes with preferential treatment for reserving rooms for visitors, as well as access to the Four Seasons’ service department including in-residence dining, laundry, dry cleaning, pet care, babysitting, and pre-arranged transport.

Closeup of 30 Park Place's imitation gargoyles, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Closeup of 30 Park Place’s imitation gargoyles, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

A total 40,000 square feet of amenities are open on-site. While some are exclusive for residents, the first four floors are available for guests of the hotel as well, including a spa, bar, steakhouse by Wolfgang Puck, and ballroom. Residents have access to a fitness center, children’s playroom, conservatory, outdoor terraces, and a reservable dining room.

Shared lounge at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Shared lounge at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The 937-foot tall structure is about four-dozen feet shy of official supertall status. 185 hotel rooms occupy the lower third of the building. 167 condominiums take up the remaining space up top.

78th Floor penthouse at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

78th Floor penthouse at 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The first of two units we visited was the 78th-floor penthouse, a five-bedroom residence spanning 5,940 square feet. It also includes an additional 434 square feet of outdoor space. Robert Couturier designed the interiors, and the space is currently listed for $29.5 million.

82nd Floor Penthouse in from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

82nd Floor Penthouse in from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The grand finale for this week culminated with our visit to the penthouse on the 82nd floor, the highest occupied floor on 30 Park Place. The 869-foot high, full-floor, three-bedroom residence comes with sweeping views of Manhattan, interiors design by Stern, and furnished by IMG. Looking north, the shape of the island is almost comprehensible.

Hudson Yards from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Hudson Yards from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Looking toward the site of our most recent coverage, Hudson Yards is looking good during the golden hour. The bundled cylindrical design at 15 Hudson Yards is surprisingly prominent from 30 Park Place, and looks particularly attractive during the sunset.

Hudson Yards at twilight, seen from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Hudson Yards at twilight, seen from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Lights were on for the construction site at Hudson Yards after sunset, most notably inside 10 Hudson Yards. The office building has been open since 2016, and has had remarkable success finding tenants.

One Manhattan Square from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan Square from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

 

One Manhattan Square at dusk from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan Square at dusk from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

One Manhattan Square has just six exposed floors remaining before the façade is topped off. From 30 Park Place, we were lucky enough to see the building’s façade shift from the black and grey-blue during golden-hour into rich silver colors just minutes before sunset.

Midtown from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Midtown from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Toward Midtown, the Billionaire’s Row supertalls are all visible. The ones under construction are rising to the left of the Empire State Building, meaning 432 Park Avenue will remain isolated in the skyline until One Vanderbilt appears to the left of the MetLife Tower. 425 Park Avenue will also make some impact as it rises directly across Park Avenue.

During our visit to 53 West 53rd Street, we got a close view of each 57th Street tower’s progress. From 30 Park Place, 111 West 57th Street is lagging behind somewhat relative to Central Park Tower. Still, it does appear to be getting close to breaking the 900-foot milestone on its climb toward 1,436 feet.

111 Murray from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

111 Murray from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Progress on the nearby 111 Murray is ongoing. The exterior hoist remains attached, indicating that significant work remains before completion.

The Woolworth Building from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The Woolworth Building from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

30 Park Place’s immediate neighbor is the Woolworth Building. The developers took care to distance their new tower as far away from the historic skyscraper as possible, so the former world’s tallest building would retain prominence. It’s also clear that Stern was the only architect fit to design a contextual tower of this caliber.

Woolworth Building and 30 Park Place, from One Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Woolworth Building and 30 Park Place, from One Manhattan Square, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

A better view of the two buildings together could be seen during our visit to One Manhattan Square.

70 Pine Street from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

70 Pine Street from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

30 Park Place also looks across 70 Pine Street, with Coney Island and the Atlantic Ocean plainly visible beyond.

3WTC from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

3WTC from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

The largest tower to block views of the Harbor is 175 Greenwich Street, aka 3 WTC. Construction is still underway for the tower, and the façade remains to be sealed where the external hoist had been located. Progress on the interiors is underway, as is clear from 30 Park Place.

The closest development to infringe on the building will be 45 Park Place. This will not impact the views significantly for 30 Park Place, since the structure will only rise to 665 feet above street level. Progress is underway on the tower, with completion expected as early as late 2019.

Lower Manhattan from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Lower Manhattan from 15 Hudson Yards, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

Despite being open for just two years, 30 Park Place has seamlessly woven itself into Lower Manhattan’s urban fabric. The limestone-clad tower is a forward-thinking building that also celebrates the city’s past.

1WTC from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

1WTC from 30 Park Place, image by Andrew Campbell Nelson

We hope you enjoyed our skyline updates week. It has been a pleasure reporting on the progress of the city’s most important development, from some of its most expensive vantage points. See the previous five articles here.

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9 Comments on "YIMBY Visits Lower Manhattan’s Crowning Residential Penthouse at 30 Park Place"

  1. Please pardon me for using your space: Do you like yellowish-brown on wood?

  2. What is the Oculus doing in the middle of this story?

  3. Thank God for Robert A. M. Stern. His works stand head and shoulders above those of his glass clad neighbors regardless of their height.

  4. David in Bushwick | May 18, 2018 at 6:36 pm | Reply

    This building is simply wonderful and the perfect neighbor to the iconic Woolworth Building, which will hopefully get a similar article here. NYC is very lucky to have Robert Stern leave us with his new iconic buildings in a era plagued with reflective glass boxes.

  5. Epic pictures. Good job YIMBY for posting them at hi-res and letting us zoom in on all the details.

  6. Good job telling us about the views but I would’ve loved seeing more of the units.

  7. Respectful to its neighbor the Woolworth in context but what about the shadows it’s casting on it? I guess this type of issue is null and void in NYC nowadays

  8. eddie spaghetti | May 26, 2018 at 6:25 am | Reply

    these stern towers are just beautiful. they look like the have always been there. the only downsides i can think of are they are somewhat clones of each other and that they suck up gagillionaires from other possibly taller and more daring towers like 111w57st.

  9. Very bad choice of location,detracts and disrespectful to the adjoining iconic landmark Woolworth building,nice going Silverstien,never the one ever to be considered a honorable community stalwart!!!!

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