Turkevi Center at 821 First Avenue Rising Quickly Above Turtle Bay, in Midtown East

Turkevi Center at 821 First Avenue. rendering by Perkins Eastman

Construction on the Turkevi Center at 821 First Avenue, in the Midtown East neighborhood of Turtle Bay, is making quick headway. The future 35-story home for the consulate of the Republic of Turkey is located between East 45th Street and East 46th Street. The glass skyscraper will reach 563 feet when it tops out in the coming months. Perkins Eastman is the designer of the mixed-use tower.

Recent photos show the tapered profile of the reinforced concrete structure becoming more apparent. Meanwhile, the curtain wall panels have begun to go up on the second floor on the East 46th Street elevation.

Looking north up First Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

Close-up of the top. Photo by Michael Young

The podium along First Avenue. Photo by Michael Young

Looking across the street from the corner of First Avenue and East 46th Street. Photo by Michael Young

Looking up the northern elevation. Photo by Michael Young

The first glass panels on the podium levels of the northern elevation. Photo by Michael Young

There will be about 102,000 square feet of commercial space on the first 15 floors. Along with an auditorium in the cellar levels, there will be offices, a prayer room, passport and visa branch offices, and outdoor terraces on the seventh, 11th, and 16th floors. Above will be 20 apartments for both staff and visitors, beginning on the 20th floor. The total residential space is slated to be about 40,195 square feet, with each unit averaging about 2,045 square feet. Two apartments are set to become duplexes. The building will provide uninterrupted views of the United Nations, the East River, and the morning sun.

Residential amenities will include a fitness center as well as a shared terrace space on the 20th floor. An underground parking garage will be located below grade and will be able to hold 20 vehicles.

Completion of the project will most likely occur sometime next year.

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Dahlia Horizon
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16 Comments on "Turkevi Center at 821 First Avenue Rising Quickly Above Turtle Bay, in Midtown East"

  1. I know, I know, another glass tower..but this one at least has some style. Thank you Turkey.

  2. Jack Liberman | March 28, 2019 at 9:19 am | Reply

    This is very interesting and slender structure, with unusual building roof parapet or crown, what will be hide roof mechanicals. And looks like building close to construct his highest floor. Interesting addition on First Avenue, thanks for presence of UN Assembly Building and Headquarters across the avenue. The Turkish Consulate New York location. 35 story and 563′ tall to his pinnacle.

  3. Jack Liberman | March 28, 2019 at 9:32 am | Reply

    And another tower crane, Crane Index said that is only “28 cranes on construction in NY, comparable with 92 in Toronto…”, I don’t want to even comment this “sacking from finger” statement, these people actually never counted all NY Tower cranes correctly and sadly that NY based NY Times repeated this shitty statement in her articles, as well as Google and Wikipedia. They are currently at least 35 tower cranes in Manhattan only, and “28 tower cranes in NYC” may be combined number of tower cranes in Brooklyn and Queens, if not more. Sorry but this count of Crane Index is made by International recognized Real Estate Advisers who are count tower cranes for many decades, including those in USA. And their US Crane Index count is laziest, they didn’t count cranes in many places, not single one in Jersey City, not a single one in booming Miami and Miami Beach, Ft Lauderdale, not in Stamford, or Pittsburgh, not in Baltimore, not in Detroit who is now under long await construction boom!!! I think “RLB Crane Index” is a scam, what not show true picture of many towns or cities who experience true construction boom, since Great Recession was over. And their count is Anti-American!!!

  4. Jack Liberman | March 28, 2019 at 9:50 am | Reply

    Rider Levitt Bucknell Crane Index, just too numbers for tower crane count for NYC, 20 TC was in November, 2018, 28 TC was in January, 2019, this all wrong, they may be missed to count cranes in Brooklyn and Queens, but even their Manhattan count is too low and incomplete.
    They are well over 28 tower cranes on construction in NYC Manhattan below 125th Street. And even their count only building with 10 floors or above, NYC 5 Borough count have at least 65-70 tower cranes. Same number as they count for Seattle. Little bit low comparable with 92 in Toronto, if their count for other cities are correct!!! But “28 construction cranes in whole NYC” and after their self claim that “they carefully counted all tower cranes across the World” and sadly Forbes, NYT repeated this wrong numbers(20 in 2018, 28 in 2019) for NYC. Maybe they didn’t know that NYC city borders are included Brooklyn, Queens, SI and Bronx, sadly that NYTimes doesn’t knows this either or her poor journalism prevent to proof that this RLB crane index dipshit count is totally wrong!!!

  5. Jack Liberman | March 28, 2019 at 9:51 am | Reply

    Two not too, sorry.

    • Jack, poor boy, my diagnosis is that you’re crane crazy.
      And that you have a lot of time on your hands.
      Perhaps the nurses on your ward let you have a lot of internet access?
      Also I am surprised that this latest comment of yours has only one curse word.
      At least you’re improving in that repect.
      As you correctly note however, the elegant building crown is a beautiful way to hide mechanicals.
      It reminds me of an organic & unfolding flower stem …perhaps a Turkish architectural influence?

  6. Rider Levitt Bucknell is based in Australia, a country what was developed from Jail Community practically. Well even their building construction is impressive and their architecture too, such as Sidney Opera House, famous and very tall building in skylines of Sydney and Melbourne, good economy health, higher GDP per cap comparable with US, or even Median income is much higher too. But they are snobby people, really came from former jail inmate descendants, and some of them hate United States, I don’t know for what reason, and without US help, they become a Japanese or China colony long time ago. I think because of British or Old Continent snobbery who thinking that US are still their former colony. That’s why they want to show the rest of World lower than actual tower crane count for NYC. Sorry for Seattle. And most Australian and NZ are ultra leftist in my opinion.

  7. maritza quintana | March 28, 2019 at 12:17 pm | Reply

    Would like an application

    • You must be a Turkish UN diplomat or his immediate family. This is Turkish consulate and apartment building for top UN visitors. Are you PM or VIP from Turkey????

  8. Funny that the architect’s rendering shows First Avenue as being a two-way street!

    • Howard Miller | March 29, 2019 at 9:51 am | Reply

      Hahahaha!

      The rendering sure does misrepresent 1st Avenue as a two-way Street.

      …and not only is that incorrect – the artist has the vehicles traveling “British style” on the “wrong side” of the roadway!!!

      (Oopsie!)

  9. Howard Miller | March 29, 2019 at 9:43 am | Reply

    If the building in its actuality matches the beauty seen in the rendering then for sure it’ll be a welcome addition to our city’s iconic skyline!

    So, here’s hoping this now under construction tower does NOT emerge as yet another tacky and crummy looking “value engineered” on the sly disappointment like so many others have in recent years!

    Fingers crossed ?

    Fingers crossed ?

    • On the Second Avenue in same neighborhood they construct in 1990s very beautiful consulate building for one of African country, I don’t remember what is one, 27 story glassy with nise seatbacks cylindrical forms stacked on each one. I believe somewhere between 45 & 46 st. And this New Turkish Consulate building is nice addition on First Avenue, like this ascending cylindrical crown.

  10. Maybe I’m a cynic, but you can already see in the photographs of the glass facade that it will look only marginally similar to the renderings. The cheap glass specified for the curtain wall reflects a chaotic mess of visual distortions and will look nothing like the clean/perfect facade visualized in the rendering. “Bendy” “dimpled” glass happens when the panel is too thin to support itself with grace and plague NYC with ugly facades that don’t match their rendering.

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