Art Deco-Inspired Rose Hill Begins Ascent at 30 East 29th Street in NoMad

The Hugh Ferriss-inspired rendering for 30 East 29th Street. Rendering courtesy of Pandiscio Green and Recent Spaces.

Construction on 30 East 29th Street, aka Rose Hill, is moving along quickly in NoMad. Work on the foundations wrapped up in January and now the upcoming 639-foot-tall structure is several floors above street level. The upcoming 45-story project is located between Park Avenue South and Madison Avenue and is being designed by CetraRuddy Architecture and developed by Rockefeller Group. The residential high-rise will incorporate an Art Deco-inspired design, setting it apart from other neighboring towers rising in the development boom, responsible for changing the skyline south of the Empire State Building. CORE is managing sales and the marketing of the units.

The construction crane sits in the center of the completed setback and will continue to climb up the northern side of the reinforced concrete structure.

30 East 29th Street rising past the main setback.

A new rendering of the tower has also been released.

Rendering of the northern elevation. Rendering courtesy of Pandiscio Green and Recent Spaces.

The podium floors have now been built up and the first set of residential levels has begun assemblage. The tower will contain 123 apartments ranging from studios to four-bedroom residences. The 40th to 43rd floor will feature duplexes with two-story-high windows and private terraces that span the depth of the eastern and western elevations. In total, 30 East 29th Street will yield about 226,000 square feet of space, with 167,000 dedicated to the residential units.

The dark-colored façade will implement subtle Art Deco flourishes like Chevron-patterned railings for the terraces and perimeter columns, bronze finishes, decorative etched grilles that will cover the mechanical floors, and an array of vertical lines that enhance the slender building’s sense of height. The top will be capped with an illuminated, multi-story crown that emulates the look of the columns that surround the base and main entrance, giving the structure a visually coherent appearance from top to bottom.

Completion of Rose Hill is most likely expected sometime in the first half of 2021.

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7 Comments on "Art Deco-Inspired Rose Hill Begins Ascent at 30 East 29th Street in NoMad"

  1. Please pardon me for using your space: I don’t have consternation on construction progress, I’m constant to tower design. Beautiful is beautiful so constancy and consternation into my mind. Consigned report to Michael Young. (Thank you)

  2. Not really Art Deco.

    • Jack Liberman | April 17, 2019 at 9:31 pm | Reply

      This is not yet finished product yet, and I think you don’t understand what is means Art Deco, is a an architectural style what is use beautification outside or inside the building, or both, in form of metallic placards, or placards made with tile mosaic and or aluminum or steel or copper pieces to for an Art Deco decorations in doors, or hallways, or oitside part of building, or on its roof crown, even with neon signs, lettering, oitside decoration and piece of arts.
      Best example of this style in architecture are main entrance and located in the end Vestibule wall of ESB, the Art Deco decoration of ESB image intself, made from bronze and Aluminium with mosaic panels (image of Empire State Building) at the end of hallway and 16 story high former Airship tower on the top of 86th Floor up to floor 102 of ESB, Chrysler Building roof crown and top floors, matalic sculptures of automobile parts on side of Building and Very rich styled Art Deco Main Hallway of Chrysler’s. Rockefeller Center inside and outside mixed material, metalic and tile mosaic in 30 Rock, Radio City Music Hall, including Art Deco styled Neon signs, and an International Building(originally a German Building), outside metalic sculpture, true Art Deco Train Station is in Cincinnati, and another example of Style is crown and elements of Trump Building 40 Wall, One Wall Street (Art Deco in the rocks), inside elements of 30th Street Station in Philadelphia, Newark Penn Station, including Art Deco styled platform canopies, San Remo luxury Building in Central Park West, 15 Central Park West (modern 21 st century Art Deco inspiration (Art Deco in rocks)), Art Deco Architectural District in South Beach, Miami Beach, Teatr and Synagogue Buildings in Miami Beach, inside elements of decoration of Union Station Complex in Los Angeles, even Brooklyn Public Library on Grand Army Plaza, or former Lincoln now Chase Building at the Corner of Coney Island Avenue and Brighton Beach, the Clock tower of Williamsburg Saving Bank Building at Hanson Place in Brooklyn, or former Bell Building in Brooklyn Metro Tech, or City Hall in Buffalo, or Tower City in Cleveland, or Credit Suisse Building in Madison Ave, 14th Street Wing of Metlife Tower.
      So what is really art deco in architecture means, simple any building who have art decorations in Art Deco “picture style” in any elements, inside or outside, doesn’t matter how this decorations limited to number of places inside or oitside buildings. Some have many Art Deco decorations, some have just one, but it’s significant. The Forms of ESB outside is generally variant of Stepback Skycraper enriched with Art Deco elements inside the main hallway and door signs of stores and Art Deco corners or Rooftop Airship Tower, Chrysler Building have automobile styled metal decorations placed on modern setback Skycraper with top floor with art deco windows and rich Art Deco decorated entrance.
      This new building will have Art Deco elements of Rockefeller Center styled Art Deco decorations inside the main Entrance, with streamlined images of Sun and People, replicas of Diego Garcia.
      Generally speaking is Art Deco in Architecture is a beautification of generally modernist buildings with new form of arts and materials, in early 1930s, emerging from Art Deco is Streamline Moderne(the best example of this is
      a Cleveland Bus Station), Miami Modern, a South Florida Art Deco inspired style in the early of 1950s up to 1960s, Mizner Style, 1980s-1990s well up to early 2000s Postmodern residential style of area West Palm Beach-Ft Lauderdale, the main architectural style of Timeshare Condos and Resorts in South Florida and also Kissimmee.
      So to say that this building in Art Deco style, means that it in fact just may have only few sharp contrast elements in decoration inside or outside. And this decorations must be fully complaint with Art Deco Style. So building with few “machine age” elements outside with zero decoration inside will be still considered as an Art Deco, sams as a building with few Art Deco “machine age” elements attached to outside panels.
      Also “machine age” elements of 1920s were not associated with glass buildings, so Glass enclosed buildings won’t be considered as Art Deco if just placed Art Deco styled Vestibule, it will be out of place, so Art Deco style must be in good harmony of bricks, tiles, mosaic, limestone, granite, marble, aluminum, steel, bronze, copper. Art Deco also in good harmony with post modern highly step back buildings, who use oitside decoration with metal or other “machine age” materials above.
      Also modern alteration of facade can destroy original style, such as in case of 3 Columbus Circle, who was an original Art Deco building, lost it’s status with neomodern glass facade, simular as Originally Brutalist now 5 Manhattan West became neo modern after getting “cascaded” firms of terraces andcvī glass facade.

      • Jack Liberman | April 17, 2019 at 9:41 pm | Reply

        Made mistake, must be read as Diego Rivera, not as “Diego Garcia”.
        Diego Rivera was Mexican and Communist, but he was hired for making arts and paintings for Rockefeller Center, even made this very alike picture with Lenin image, what was rejected and forced him to repaint it.

  3. I’m gay so as long as they let me live here I’m ok with it.

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