Demo Permits Filed for 123 West 57th Street in Midtown, Manhattan

123 West 57th Street in Midtown, Manhattan123 West 57th Street via Google Maps

Full demolition permits have been filed for 123 West 57th Street in Midtown, Manhattan. According to the filing, the site is owned by Alchemy Properties. It currently houses Calvary Baptist Church and the Salisbury Hotel, a 16-story, 153-foot-tall structure built in 1930.

123 West 57th Street is located on Billionaires’ Row, in a prime spot nestled among supertalls. Much speculation has been paid to what could potentially be built, and by whom. The site is located steps way from the 57th Street subway station, serviced by N and Q trains.

Breeze Demolition National is listed as the applicant of record.

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The Chatsworth Horizon
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11 Comments on "Demo Permits Filed for 123 West 57th Street in Midtown, Manhattan"

  1. Thanks to YIMBY of New York: Short, simple and not long; I like your report to its point via Google Maps.

  2. Good to know what subway stop is near. That information will be really valuable to the billionaires when they decide whether or not to spend $120m on a condo there.

    • You would be surprised how many Uber wealthy people ride the subways in NYC. I actually know a billionaire that lives at One57 who rides the subway.

  3. glenn stancroff | November 9, 2019 at 9:48 am | Reply

    Don’t forget the F stop at 57 and Sixth.

  4. David in Bushwick | November 9, 2019 at 11:34 am | Reply

    Another historic building destroyed for the tax-sheltering ruling class. There is already a glut of ultra-expensive apartments and this very noisy location is wedged between two +1,000 foot towers. The Greed Era must end before we do.

  5. They are not building anything like this almost historic structure anymore. Why there isn’t an historic review board in New York for all the boroughs is beyond my understanding. Pulling down this building to build yet another bland piece of crap to stroke the egos of a bunch of wealthy egotists is obscene. And, BTW, having money doesn’t mean you have taste.

  6. Another reason I will never walk along West 57th Street ever again…

  7. I believe they are building an office tower – per real deal article

  8. I’m a little surprised by everyone’s comments here! This is a pro-development website!
    I do agree it’s comical to mention which subway stop is close by. LOL but to say that this development is due to greed, is no different than in the 1920s when row houses were pushed aside for much taller structures. Most of which are outdated and utilize much more power than necessary. I do agree it’s comical to mention which subway stop is close by. LOL but to say that this development is due to greed, is no different than in the 1920s when row houses were pushed aside for much taller structures. It’s called progress..
    Step aside, because it’s not stopping for you.

  9. At least Carnegie Hall is landmarked. Developers tried to raze that once before, in the late 1950s, and almost succeeded. They’d probably go after it again if it weren’t for its protected status.

  10. Suzanne Spellen | November 11, 2019 at 6:08 pm | Reply

    This is not progress. They will be destroying one of the very few, if not the only example in Manhattan, of a house of worship built into the ground floor structure of a commercial building from the Deco era. When it was built in the early 1930s, it was specifically designed with Gothic detailing to be an ideal combination of God and Mammon in the heart of the city. The church, which has always owned the building, was able to capitalize on the spaces above during the Great Depression. Now some could make legit arguments about a non-profit religious organization making money from renting hotel rooms or office space, and that’s a great discussion to have, but this building is worthy of keeping for its architectural and historic merits. It is thoughtful, carefully planned out, and quite successful as a building. The church space works. We landmark for less. This should be landmarked, and preserved. But it probably won’t be. When it comes to big real estate in NYC, the money always wins, and the cityscape, and the people generally lose.

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