Hill West Architects Reveals Renderings for Massive Waterfront Complex in Flushing, Queens

Preliminary Rendring of the Proposed Flushing Waterfront DistrictPreliminary Rendring of the Proposed Flushing Waterfront District

The Flushing Willets Point Corona Local Development Corporation recently submitted proposals to New York City’s Department of City Planning to facilitate the redevelopment of a 29-acre stretch of waterfront industrial property and surrounding lands in Flushing, Queens. The proposals were drafted in collaboration with Langan Engineering and Environmental Services and contain new renderings from Hill West Architects offering a first look at what’s to come.

Known as the Special Flushing Waterfront District, the project area is bound by 40th Road to the south, College Point Boulevard to the east, 36th Avenue to the north, and Flushing Creek to the west. The proposal includes nine buildings spread across four neighboring sites.

Preliminary Rending of the Proposed Flushing Waterfront District - Hill West Architects

Preliminary Rending of the Proposed Flushing Waterfront District – Hill West Architects

Overall, the proposed project will comprise 1,725 apartments, 1,397,040 square feet of commercial area, and 21,913 square feet of community facilities. Commercial components will include 298,811 square feet of retail, a 714,588-square-foot hotel, and 383,641 square feet of office space. The project will also include 1,533 parking spaces and a total of 3.14 acres of publicly accessible open space.

Rendering of buildings at Site 1 - Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 1 – Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 2 - Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 2 – Hill West Architects

Rendering of public space at Site 2 - Hill West Architects

Rendering of public space at Site 2 – Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 3 - Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 3 – Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 4 - Hill West Architects

Rendering of buildings at Site 4 – Hill West Architects

Assuming the city will permit alterations of the existing industrial zoning ordinances to allow for construction of mixed-use buildings in the area, construction is expected to begin in 2020 with all components complete and fully operational by 2025.

In 2010, the Flushing Willets Point Corona Local Development Corporation received a grant under the New York State Brownfield Opportunity Areas Program to develop plans to replace vacant and underutilized properties in the area in an effort to revitalize Flushing’s waterfront area. If approved, the development would serve as an extension of Downtown Flushing.

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18 Comments on "Hill West Architects Reveals Renderings for Massive Waterfront Complex in Flushing, Queens"

  1. Michael Richman | December 16, 2019 at 8:02 am | Reply

    Maybe I missed it, but what is being built to the southwest of Sky View park? Lots of construction just north of the LIRR Port Washington line.

  2. Great development, nice boost in density close to public transit. This is exactly what we need more of across the city. It is such a shame about the height limit in Flushing, otherwise Flushing could be another LIC and these could be 40-story towers. If this was Seoul there would be a dozen 30-40 story buildings and they would be done in two years.

  3. @ Adam Smith

    So true!

  4. Traffic in Flushing is a nightmare which cannot handle this kind of development. The developer will get a giant tax break, walk away with a lot of money, and Flushing will be no better for it. Try taking a bus through Flushing or riding the 7 train at rush hour.

  5. An instant Chinatown. Yay.

  6. Let’s hope the developers respect residence of Queens enough to use union labor on this project including Local 45 Carpenters. Transforming the borough in this century should be beneficial to it’s residence at all levels; including design, construction, and the eventual long term use as residences, businesses, and recreation. The development group claims to have its vision focused around the revitalizing the community, so they must respect this goal and utilize the labor of union tradesman, many of whom live within the immediate area!

  7. parking and driving in downtown flushing is currently a big problem. This will not help.

  8. MTA better think about expanding the 7 Line all along Northern Blvd up to Bayside while this project is happening.

  9. 25% affordable housing
    25% senior citizens

  10. I’ve been waiting a lifetime to see that river-front property developed and public access to the shore become possible. This project could be an exciting answer to the continuing high demand for housing in central Flushing. But skeptics worried about density and congestion have a point, too. Possible ameliorations should include: Residents of this development should be discouraged from car ownership by the omission of any parking spaces. The developer should be required to pay for a new western entrance to the Main Street subway station. Some bus routes currently on Main Street should be moved to College Point Boulevard at the eastern edge of this project instead.

  11. That’s a LOT more people riding the already at-capacity 7 train. I’ve read they can’t add more trains due to scheduling and lack of track space.

  12. The Flushing area is SEVERELY over crowded at present. More affordable housing is needed, but what’s considered affordable, who makes that decision?? The streets are dirty, illegal sidewalk selling allowed on the streets, unfair treatment of some customers, prostitution rampant , the northern Blvd bridge is in TROUBLE., not built to withstand the pop. growth in Flushing.
    There are at least 5 hotels in the Northern Blvd area. DO WE NEED MORE? Who will manage the housing applications; will it be done FAIRLY??? It’s NOT now!! Much to be done before such a project is approved. How about just CLEANING UP THE FLUSHING CREEK, first.

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