202 East 23rd Street Awaits Demolition in Kips Bay, Manhattan

202 East 23rd Street. Photo by Tectonic

YIMBY stopped by 202 East 23rd Street in Kips Bay, the future site of a 14-story mixed-use building from Hill West Architects and SMA Equities. Recent photos from Tectonic show the state of progress at the lot, which is located at the southern corner of Third Avenue and East 23rd Street. Two vacant three-story buildings sit boarded up, awaiting the start of demolition.

202 East 23rd Street. Photo by Tectonic

202 East 23rd Street is slated to rise 149 feet tall and yield 63,996 square feet. 51,104 square feet will be designated for residential space split among 79 units, most likely denoting rentals with an average of 646 square feet apiece. There will also be 2,453 square feet of commercial space. The address is two blocks east of the 23rd Street subway station, serviced by the 6 train.

The new reinforced concrete structure’s modest height will fit comfortably within the context of the neighborhood. The site is located within close proximity to a number of parks such as Madison Square Park, Gramercy Park, Bellevue South Park, and Stuyvesant Square Park. The School of Visual Arts is across the street to the north at 209 East 23rd Street, and Baruch College is also nearby at 55 Lexington Avenue.

No completion date for 202 East 23rd Street has been announced. A finalized rendering for the edifice also remains to be seen.

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TFC Horizon
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2 Comments on "202 East 23rd Street Awaits Demolition in Kips Bay, Manhattan"

  1. A major intersection such as Third Avenue & 23rd Street certainly deserves better than those 3-story commercial buildings!
    A definite improvement is on the way…. with an addition of a small apartment house to take their place.

  2. When I first moved into the neighborhood this was a bank. I can’t remember what bank, Apple perhaps? They had one of the first ATMs — you could request exact dollars and change, such as $23.74. Dollars and cents! It was a very different world. All about the people.

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