Renderings Reveal RAMSA-Designed Residential Tower at 14-16 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village, Manhattan

Rendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue; Front elevation - Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty CapitalRendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue; Front elevation - Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

The Landmarks Preservation Commission will tomorrow review proposals from Madison Realty Capital to construct a new 19-story condominium building at 14-16 Fifth Avenue. Designed by Robert A.M. Stern Architects with Hill West, the tower would eventually house 20 units, but will first need a Certificate of Appropriateness from the voting commissioners.

Architectural renderings from the design team reveal a Flemish Bond brick façade with Juliet balconies, stone cornices, and decorative fluted pilasters among other materials that emulate the multiple architectural styles found in the surrounding Greenwich Village Historic District. Portions of the building’s upper floors are set back to support private outdoor terraces for select residences.

Rendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue and neighboring properties - Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

Rendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue and neighboring properties – Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

Rendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue; Looking west from Fifth Avenue - Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

Rendering of 14-16 Fifth Avenue; Looking west from Fifth Avenue – Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

The development site is currently occupied by two five-story apartment buildings. The original structure was completed around 1848 and was essentially erased in the 1930s following a drastic exterior renovation that removed existing stoops and front doors, parlor windows, and decorative cornices, as well as all decorative door and window framing.

Today, the façade of the existing structure is smooth stucco with no remnants of any architectural significance. Even Community Board 2, which vehemently opposes the development, acknowledges the existing property’s lack of definitive architectural style, and has instead argued that the building is of “cultural and social significance.” These dissenting opinions reference the litany of famous and influential people who once resided in the building.

Historic photo of 14-16 Fifth Avenue circa 1925 (left) and existing conditions (right) - Madison Realty Capital

Historic photo of 14-16 Fifth Avenue circa 1925 (left) and existing conditions (right) – Madison Realty Capital

With respect to local community groups, the RAMSA, Hill West, and Madison Realty Capital have scaled back the height of the tower and modified the façade to better emulate the surrounding district. The first iteration of design was unveiled in 2015 and called for the construction of a 362-foot-tall structure. Current proposals specify a 241-foot-tall development that is more cohesive with neighboring buildings along this portion of Fifth Avenue, West Eighth, and West Ninth Streets.

Timeline of proposed development at 14-16 Fifth Avenue - Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

Timeline of proposed development at 14-16 Fifth Avenue – Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Madison Realty Capital

Additional members of the project team include City Urban Realty and historic consultants Acheson Doyle Partners Architects.

If approved, the estimated completion target is in the fourth quarter of 2023.

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8 Comments on "Renderings Reveal RAMSA-Designed Residential Tower at 14-16 Fifth Avenue in Greenwich Village, Manhattan"

  1. David in Bushwick | March 8, 2021 at 8:32 am | Reply

    This lowered height version is definitely more fitting to the neighborhood and the facade is lovely. The upper asymmetrical floors are rather strange. It suggests a later addition but perhaps matches too much. Setting it back from the street wall would draw less unneeded attention to the top floors.

  2. This project just keeps getting worse and worse. Lets get back to the 2015 proposal.

  3. The middle version wouldn’t have been innapropriate for the neighborhood but the final version is undeniably good looking.

  4. This handsome building is completely contextual in every way. If anyone at LPC complains 241 ft is too tall, perhaps remind them that One Fifth (directly across the street) is over 100 feet taller (350 ft).

  5. So far, I think this design is the best.

  6. If Community Board 2 still opposes this and wants to keep that mutilated barrack that’s there now, they are insane.

  7. The Greenwich Village Historic district was landmarked as exactly that – a district, not a conglomeration of individual lamdmarks. A key characteristic of the area is its preponderance of mid nineteenth century buildings. And these buildings on 5th Ave. contribute to that characteristic. This development is essentially an un-landmarking of the district. It is tragic to see that it is Robert Stern who is leading this dangerous precedent.

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