New Renderings Reveal Proposed Gowanus, Brooklyn Waterfront Redevelopment Following ULURP Certification

Rendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Nevins Street - Gowanus ForwardRendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Nevins Street - SCAPE; Gowanus Forward

Newly revealed renderings illustrate an exciting future for the Gowanus Canal waterfront and the surrounding streetscape. From Gowanus Forward, a consortium of developers including Domain Companies, Monadnock, and PMG, the renderings show a drastically reinvigorated public thoroughfare with open green spaces, recreational boating, new benches, and a winding esplanade.

The renderings are credited to SCAPE, the same urban design and landscape architectural team for the Greenpoint Library and Environmental Education Center in Brooklyn, the First Avenue Water Plaza in Manhattan, and the Gowanus Lowlands plan.

Rendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Carroll Street - Gowanus Forward

Rendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Carroll Street – SCAPE; Gowanus Forward

Rendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Carroll Street - Gowanus Forward

Rendering of the rezoned Gowanus waterfront and public esplanade along Carroll Street – SCAPE; Gowanus Forward

Earlier this week, the project was certified by city agencies as part of the Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) process, one of several key prerequisites for the project to advance. Rezoning approvals for the mixed-use district are now pending. Beyond the creation of new public areas, the rezoning is expected to facilitate the creation of approximately 8,500 new housing units. This includes roughly 3,000 income-restricted affordable apartments.

The project scope also includes infrastructure upgrades to support the influx of new residents, as well as resiliency measures to mitigate potential damage caused by rising tides and seasonal storms. Specifics were not included in the latest outline from the development team.

“The Gowanus rezoning presents a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to create beautiful, publicly accessible open space along a cleaned-up canal front, desperately needed affordable housing and dedicated space for the artists and makers who have contributed to the neighborhood’s rich artistic and cultural history,” said Frank Dubinsky from Monadnock. “But, it’s imperative that we get this right by ensuring that the open space is cohesive in design, accessible to all, and contributes to the neighborhood’s resiliency.”

The land around the canal has been inaccessible and contaminated for decades. Property along the waterfront would be remediated under the supervision of New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection before new buildings could be occupied. The canal waters are currently undergoing cleanup by the Environmental Protection Agency.

At this time, a project timeline has not been released.

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25 Comments on "New Renderings Reveal Proposed Gowanus, Brooklyn Waterfront Redevelopment Following ULURP Certification"

  1. David in Bushwick | June 8, 2021 at 8:15 am | Reply

    This is a well-designed, very positive project for a long neglected area. Affordable housing units are the icing on the cake.
    It would be nice if the canal edge isn’t just a steel wall but rather something closer to nature.

    • Yeah the sheet piling is not a good look. Massive stone blocks that terraced down to water level would be ideal.

    • What is the Gowaus Rezone?
      this is being built on a superfund site.

      The Gowanus Rezone was originally proposed under the Bloomberg administration while now-Mayor de Blasio was still the councilperson representing District 39. Originally limited to 12-story buildings with 20% affordable housing, the ambition of the upzoning has exploded since Councilmember Brad Lander was elected to replace de Blasio. The new plan, developed in partnership with developers, rewards them with huge tax cuts and credits, while demanding very few benefits for the community.

      It Is Enormous
      It Is Environmentally Irresponsible & Dangerous

      Deeply Toxic Land: The land surrounding the Gowanus Canal once housed different types of industries that produced toxic waste that has seeped deep into the ground. The parcel of land called Public Place has coal tar at depths of 150 feet and after remediation will still need to be monitored in perpetuity — this is the land where a school and most of the affordable housing is planned. And the City keeps reducing how much it will clean this area.

      The Canal is Extremely Toxic: The Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted waterways in the United States as a result of over a century of industrial and municipal negligence. In fact, the Gowanus is so polluted that the federal government recognized it as a Superfund site in 2010 for its imminent threat to community health. The Gowanus Canal is not only full of industrial runoff, it also has a pathogen level that is a threat to human health as a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant organisms.

      Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage: When the sewer system in the area can’t handle all of the water coming into it, the excess runs directly into the Gowanus Canal. The 20,000 new residents the rezone proposes to bring to the neighborhood will increase the amount of waste entering the area’s sewer system tenfold. In fact, the EPA recently said there was no way to keep the water clean with the amount of development that is being planned.

      Building in a Flood Zone: Most of the area to be rezoned is in a FEMA Flood Zone A — land that is most likely to be overwhelmed if another Hurricane Sandy should hit the area. Environmentalists and others are demanding that we don’t build more housing in flood zones, putting more people in harm’s way.

      Impedes Canal Cleanup: The residents of Gowanus, along with Representative Nydia Velasquez, fought very hard —against the wishes of then-councilmember Bill de Blasio— to get the Federal Government to clean up the canal. Our current councilmember Brad Lander did nothing to assist this effort. But the City is now reneging on its responsibilities to address the CSO discharges, and has already delayed the cleanup for over a decade, claiming they don’t have the money needed. Yet the City is about to subsidize an enormous rezone. Why are new luxury towers more important than a clean canal?

  2. Borrowing from Kenk, Marcel Lok and a lot of work in Amsterdam I see. Not bad, but I steel feel this is too dense for that area. This is like adding another few 363/365 Bond streets, wonder how that will impact the neighborhood.

    • So the solution is less density?

      • It Is Expensive

        The city proposes incentivizing private developers to build wildly profitable luxury housing, while passing the risk to NYC taxpayers. These developers will receive decades-long tax breaks and credits, costing billions in taxpayer funds.

        Millionaires Will Pay No Property Tax: Because of the 421a program, developers of luxury apartment towers will not pay any property tax for 35 years. The 421a program is estimated to cost the city $2.4 billion a year in lost tax revenue. And who is going to pay for the infrastructure required for 20,000 new residents?

        Taxpayers Will Be on the Hook for Three Times What it Costs to Clean the Land Each developer will be responsible for cleaning their own plots of land, potentially exposing neighboring residents to toxic fumes during their work. As part of the Brownfield Cleanup Program, developers will then be reimbursed three times what it cost them to do the cleanup, up to $35 million for each development. These are our taxpayer dollars, going directly to millionaire developers, while the city is facing an economic crisis.

        Wealthy Investors Will Pay NO Taxes on Profits: Almost the entire area to be rezoned is part of an “opportunity zone,” a special designation that is given to “distressed” communities, and which allows investors who make money on the rezone to avoid paying any taxes on their profits. In New York State, losses from the “Opportunity Zone” program may amount to as much as $63 million annually for New York State, and an additional $31 million annually for New York City

        Elimination of Jobs: The plan will eliminate many of the existing manufacturing zones, thereby eradicating the opportunity for new, diverse jobs. This, at a time when bringing industry back to NYC is what experts are recommending will spur economic growth.

  3. Why are building housing on what is essentially another Love Canal?

  4. There seems to be two of the same rendering…
    Beautiful project though. Everything about it is just fantastic.

    • What is the Gowaus Rezone?
      this is being built on a superfund site.

      The Gowanus Rezone was originally proposed under the Bloomberg administration while now-Mayor de Blasio was still the councilperson representing District 39. Originally limited to 12-story buildings with 20% affordable housing, the ambition of the upzoning has exploded since Councilmember Brad Lander was elected to replace de Blasio. The new plan, developed in partnership with developers, rewards them with huge tax cuts and credits, while demanding very few benefits for the community.

      It Is Enormous
      It Is Environmentally Irresponsible & Dangerous

      Deeply Toxic Land: The land surrounding the Gowanus Canal once housed different types of industries that produced toxic waste that has seeped deep into the ground. The parcel of land called Public Place has coal tar at depths of 150 feet and after remediation will still need to be monitored in perpetuity — this is the land where a school and most of the affordable housing is planned. And the City keeps reducing how much it will clean this area.

      The Canal is Extremely Toxic: The Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted waterways in the United States as a result of over a century of industrial and municipal negligence. In fact, the Gowanus is so polluted that the federal government recognized it as a Superfund site in 2010 for its imminent threat to community health. The Gowanus Canal is not only full of industrial runoff, it also has a pathogen level that is a threat to human health as a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant organisms.

      Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage: When the sewer system in the area can’t handle all of the water coming into it, the excess runs directly into the Gowanus Canal. The 20,000 new residents the rezone proposes to bring to the neighborhood will increase the amount of waste entering the area’s sewer system tenfold. In fact, the EPA recently said there was no way to keep the water clean with the amount of development that is being planned.

      Building in a Flood Zone: Most of the area to be rezoned is in a FEMA Flood Zone A — land that is most likely to be overwhelmed if another Hurricane Sandy should hit the area. Environmentalists and others are demanding that we don’t build more housing in flood zones, putting more people in harm’s way.

      Impedes Canal Cleanup: The residents of Gowanus, along with Representative Nydia Velasquez, fought very hard —against the wishes of then-councilmember Bill de Blasio— to get the Federal Government to clean up the canal. Our current councilmember Brad Lander did nothing to assist this effort. But the City is now reneging on its responsibilities to address the CSO discharges, and has already delayed the cleanup for over a decade, claiming they don’t have the money needed. Yet the City is about to subsidize an enormous rezone. Why are new luxury towers more important than a clean canal?

      • Deeply Toxic Land, The Canal is Extremely Toxic, Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage, Impedes Canal Cleanup

        If anything, more people living closer to the canal equals MORE stakeholders & voters wanting the canal and surrounding areas cleaned up.

        Luxury towers and a clean canal aren’t mutually exclusive outcomes. Open your mind

  5. What is the Gowaus Rezone?
    this is being built on a superfund site.

    The Gowanus Rezone was originally proposed under the Bloomberg administration while now-Mayor de Blasio was still the councilperson representing District 39. Originally limited to 12-story buildings with 20% affordable housing, the ambition of the upzoning has exploded since Councilmember Brad Lander was elected to replace de Blasio. The new plan, developed in partnership with developers, rewards them with huge tax cuts and credits, while demanding very few benefits for the community.

    It Is Enormous
    It Is Environmentally Irresponsible & Dangerous

    Deeply Toxic Land: The land surrounding the Gowanus Canal once housed different types of industries that produced toxic waste that has seeped deep into the ground. The parcel of land called Public Place has coal tar at depths of 150 feet and after remediation will still need to be monitored in perpetuity — this is the land where a school and most of the affordable housing is planned. And the City keeps reducing how much it will clean this area.

    The Canal is Extremely Toxic: The Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted waterways in the United States as a result of over a century of industrial and municipal negligence. In fact, the Gowanus is so polluted that the federal government recognized it as a Superfund site in 2010 for its imminent threat to community health. The Gowanus Canal is not only full of industrial runoff, it also has a pathogen level that is a threat to human health as a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant organisms.

    Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage: When the sewer system in the area can’t handle all of the water coming into it, the excess runs directly into the Gowanus Canal. The 20,000 new residents the rezone proposes to bring to the neighborhood will increase the amount of waste entering the area’s sewer system tenfold. In fact, the EPA recently said there was no way to keep the water clean with the amount of development that is being planned.

    Building in a Flood Zone: Most of the area to be rezoned is in a FEMA Flood Zone A — land that is most likely to be overwhelmed if another Hurricane Sandy should hit the area. Environmentalists and others are demanding that we don’t build more housing in flood zones, putting more people in harm’s way.

    Impedes Canal Cleanup: The residents of Gowanus, along with Representative Nydia Velasquez, fought very hard —against the wishes of then-councilmember Bill de Blasio— to get the Federal Government to clean up the canal. Our current councilmember Brad Lander did nothing to assist this effort. But the City is now reneging on its responsibilities to address the CSO discharges, and has already delayed the cleanup for over a decade, claiming they don’t have the money needed. Yet the City is about to subsidize an enormous rezone. Why are new luxury towers more important than a clean canal?

    Extends Far Beyond Gowanus: The rezoning plan spans 80 blocks bounded by Bond Street to the west, Baltic Street to the north, 4th Avenue to the east from Atlantic Avenue to 15th Street and cuts off near Hamilton Avenue. It is the single largest rezone proposed during the de Blasio administration.

    Huge Influx of New Residents: The plan would bring 8,200 additional apartments to the neighborhood — and at least 20,000 new residents.

    Dozens of New Luxury Towers: The plan would allow 22 to 30 story towers to be built lining both sides of the Gowanus Canal, and along 4th Avenue between 9th Street and Atlantic Ave, and in other areas. The yellow buildings in the image above identify the new luxury apartment buildings proposed for the neighborhood.

    Majority of Apartments Will Be Super Expensive: 70% of the new housing would be high-end luxury apartments, with rents well above $3,000, according to current trends.

  6. It Is Expensive

    The city proposes incentivizing private developers to build wildly profitable luxury housing, while passing the risk to NYC taxpayers. These developers will receive decades-long tax breaks and credits, costing billions in taxpayer funds.

    Millionaires Will Pay No Property Tax: Because of the 421a program, developers of luxury apartment towers will not pay any property tax for 35 years. The 421a program is estimated to cost the city $2.4 billion a year in lost tax revenue. And who is going to pay for the infrastructure required for 20,000 new residents?

    Taxpayers Will Be on the Hook for Three Times What it Costs to Clean the Land Each developer will be responsible for cleaning their own plots of land, potentially exposing neighboring residents to toxic fumes during their work. As part of the Brownfield Cleanup Program, developers will then be reimbursed three times what it cost them to do the cleanup, up to $35 million for each development. These are our taxpayer dollars, going directly to millionaire developers, while the city is facing an economic crisis.

    Wealthy Investors Will Pay NO Taxes on Profits: Almost the entire area to be rezoned is part of an “opportunity zone,” a special designation that is given to “distressed” communities, and which allows investors who make money on the rezone to avoid paying any taxes on their profits. In New York State, losses from the “Opportunity Zone” program may amount to as much as $63 million annually for New York State, and an additional $31 million annually for New York City

    Elimination of Jobs: The plan will eliminate many of the existing manufacturing zones, thereby eradicating the opportunity for new, diverse jobs. This, at a time when bringing industry back to NYC is what experts are recommending will spur economic growth.

  7. Cancer Guaranteed!
    This canal is the most toxic waterway in the country. Its an open sewer with polluted water and toxic fumes. You can smell it two blocks away. This is insane greed and negligence to build housing of any kind here. People will get cancer and take the city to court. Developers will just wash their hands while taxpayers pay the bill.

  8. Wow this one got spammed by NIMBYs.

    It’s a nice looking development and will be very popular.

    “The project scope also includes infrastructure upgrades to support the influx of new residents, as well as resiliency measures to mitigate potential damage caused by rising tides and seasonal storms.”

    “Property along the waterfront would be remediated under the supervision of New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection before new buildings could be occupied. The canal waters are currently undergoing cleanup by the Environmental Protection Agency.”

    • Hey guest
      you wouldn’t live next to a super fund site or send your kids to school on top of toxic sludge would you?
      give me some rebuttal based upon these facts,

      The land surrounding the Gowanus Canal once housed different types of industries that produced toxic waste that has seeped deep into the ground. The parcel of land called Public Place has coal tar at depths of 150 feet and after remediation will still need to be monitored in perpetuity — this is the land where a school and most of the affordable housing is planned. And the City keeps reducing how much it will clean this area.

      The Canal is Extremely Toxic: The Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted waterways in the United States as a result of over a century of industrial and municipal negligence. In fact, the Gowanus is so polluted that the federal government recognized it as a Superfund site in 2010 for its imminent threat to community health. The Gowanus Canal is not only full of industrial runoff, it also has a pathogen level that is a threat to human health as a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant organisms.

      Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage: When the sewer system in the area can’t handle all of the water coming into it, the excess runs directly into the Gowanus Canal. The 20,000 new residents the rezone proposes to bring to the neighborhood will increase the amount of waste entering the area’s sewer system tenfold. In fact, the EPA recently said there was no way to keep the water clean with the amount of development that is being planned.

      Building in a Flood Zone: Most of the area to be rezoned is in a FEMA Flood Zone A — land that is most likely to be overwhelmed if another Hurricane Sandy should hit the area. Environmentalists and others are demanding that we don’t build more housing in flood zones, putting more people in harm’s way.

  9. Arman Negahban | June 8, 2021 at 2:40 pm | Reply

    Developers are currently building apartment buildings along the canal right now, even without the rezoning. Opposition to the rezoning doesn’t stop development along the canal, it just reduces the amount of resources made available to actually clean up the canal.

    I live three short blocks from the canal. What was once a mostly industrial area is slowly becoming a residential neighborhood even without rezoning. The dye factory next door to me, which was the largest single source of pollution in nyc as recently as 1981, will close next year. Still there are active scrap metal recyclers directly next door to brand new apartments and brownfields scattered all across the neighborhood. The rezoning proposal is the first time in Gowanus history that a unified plan could actually be implemented to clean up the canal and invest in the neighborhood.

    The opponents of the rezoning are guilty if letting the perfect be the enemy of the good.

    • Shane C Keena | June 9, 2021 at 12:11 pm | Reply

      Exactly, that’s what I have been trying to say to these people! The opponents of the rezoning won’t take the win when it’s literally sitting on their face! Will this area be gentrified in 10 years’ time? Probably, but in the grand scheme of things, gentrification is more often than not a better thing for everyone. It only takes one company to come in and improve things. Where I’m at, a craft brewing company set up shop and the entire vibe changed lickety split. Now we’ve got a recording studio and numerous nice restaurants, and commercial space was renovated a few years ago, it’s never been nicer!

      • Hey shane and Arman read this and give me some rebuttal based upon facts

        What is the Gowaus Rezone?
        this is being built on a superfund site.

        The Gowanus Rezone was originally proposed under the Bloomberg administration while now-Mayor de Blasio was still the councilperson representing District 39. Originally limited to 12-story buildings with 20% affordable housing, the ambition of the upzoning has exploded since Councilmember Brad Lander was elected to replace de Blasio. The new plan, developed in partnership with developers, rewards them with huge tax cuts and credits, while demanding very few benefits for the community.

        It Is Enormous
        It Is Environmentally Irresponsible & Dangerous

        Deeply Toxic Land: The land surrounding the Gowanus Canal once housed different types of industries that produced toxic waste that has seeped deep into the ground. The parcel of land called Public Place has coal tar at depths of 150 feet and after remediation will still need to be monitored in perpetuity — this is the land where a school and most of the affordable housing is planned. And the City keeps reducing how much it will clean this area.

        The Canal is Extremely Toxic: The Gowanus Canal is one of the most polluted waterways in the United States as a result of over a century of industrial and municipal negligence. In fact, the Gowanus is so polluted that the federal government recognized it as a Superfund site in 2010 for its imminent threat to community health. The Gowanus Canal is not only full of industrial runoff, it also has a pathogen level that is a threat to human health as a breeding ground for antibiotic-resistant organisms.

        Overwhelming Canal with Raw Sewage: When the sewer system in the area can’t handle all of the water coming into it, the excess runs directly into the Gowanus Canal. The 20,000 new residents the rezone proposes to bring to the neighborhood will increase the amount of waste entering the area’s sewer system tenfold. In fact, the EPA recently said there was no way to keep the water clean with the amount of development that is being planned.

        Building in a Flood Zone: Most of the area to be rezoned is in a FEMA Flood Zone A — land that is most likely to be overwhelmed if another Hurricane Sandy should hit the area. Environmentalists and others are demanding that we don’t build more housing in flood zones, putting more people in harm’s way.

        Impedes Canal Cleanup: The residents of Gowanus, along with Representative Nydia Velasquez, fought very hard —against the wishes of then-councilmember Bill de Blasio— to get the Federal Government to clean up the canal. Our current councilmember Brad Lander did nothing to assist this effort. But the City is now reneging on its responsibilities to address the CSO discharges, and has already delayed the cleanup for over a decade, claiming they don’t have the money needed. Yet the City is about to subsidize an enormous rezone. Why are new luxury towers more important than a clean canal?

        Extends Far Beyond Gowanus: The rezoning plan spans 80 blocks bounded by Bond Street to the west, Baltic Street to the north, 4th Avenue to the east from Atlantic Avenue to 15th Street and cuts off near Hamilton Avenue. It is the single largest rezone proposed during the de Blasio administration.

        Huge Influx of New Residents: The plan would bring 8,200 additional apartments to the neighborhood — and at least 20,000 new residents.

        Dozens of New Luxury Towers: The plan would allow 22 to 30 story towers to be built lining both sides of the Gowanus Canal, and along 4th Avenue between 9th Street and Atlantic Ave, and in other areas. The yellow buildings in the image above identify the new luxury apartment buildings proposed for the neighborhood.

        Majority of Apartments Will Be Super Expensive: 70% of the new housing would be high-end luxury apartments, with rents well above $3,000, according to current trends.The city proposes incentivizing private developers to build wildly profitable luxury housing, while passing the risk to NYC taxpayers. These developers will receive decades-long tax breaks and credits, costing billions in taxpayer funds.

        Millionaires Will Pay No Property Tax: Because of the 421a program, developers of luxury apartment towers will not pay any property tax for 35 years. The 421a program is estimated to cost the city $2.4 billion a year in lost tax revenue. And who is going to pay for the infrastructure required for 20,000 new residents?

        Taxpayers Will Be on the Hook for Three Times What it Costs to Clean the Land Each developer will be responsible for cleaning their own plots of land, potentially exposing neighboring residents to toxic fumes during their work. As part of the Brownfield Cleanup Program, developers will then be reimbursed three times what it cost them to do the cleanup, up to $35 million for each development. These are our taxpayer dollars, going directly to millionaire developers, while the city is facing an economic crisis.

        Wealthy Investors Will Pay NO Taxes on Profits: Almost the entire area to be rezoned is part of an “opportunity zone,” a special designation that is given to “distressed” communities, and which allows investors who make money on the rezone to avoid paying any taxes on their profits. In New York State, losses from the “Opportunity Zone” program may amount to as much as $63 million annually for New York State, and an additional $31 million annually for New York City

        Elimination of Jobs: The plan will eliminate many of the existing manufacturing zones, thereby eradicating the opportunity for new, diverse jobs. This, at a time when bringing industry back to NYC is what experts are recommending will spur economic growth.

        • Shane C Keena | June 10, 2021 at 1:41 pm | Reply

          I’m surprised that by the absolutely insane amount of spam comments you made here you haven’t gotten kicked out already, but here I go;

          1. Supply and Demand.
          If demand for affordable housing requires more units to get built and if the Gowanus Canal needs to be cleaned up, the developers need to make that money back somehow, they aren’t charities. That’s why they want 30-story towers on Gowanus and that’s why they want the 3-times reimbursement on taxes, it only makes financial sense when they can develop to that clip and they get reimbursed for the lost revenue. The developers are the ones actually organizing crews to come in and do cleanup, the city isn’t really doing very much except issuing CO’s and approvals. Another thing; The reason the boundaries of the rezoning are large is so that the developers can accrue more air rights to be able to build large enough buildings as-of-right.

          2. The tax incentives the developers are using here are preexisting for all brownfield/superfund sites. The developers will bring in new residents, who WILL pay taxes and contribute to the system.

          3. Get creative for wastewater management and cleanup. Build a freakin’ treatment plant somewhere nearby and route sewage from the new developments to the new facility. Maybe pump out the canal so you can do cleanup without worry of toxins seeping into the water. Also, tell them to build a new seawall if you’re so afraid of flooding.

  10. I am looking for a one bedroom that take section 8 voucher call you please send me a text or aplicación thank you

  11. Howard Miller | June 18, 2021 at 11:58 am | Reply

    @ARNELO,

    Having lived near 9th Ave in Park Slope for 12 years, followed by another 9 years also along the F train line that allowed me to see – and experience – first hand the parcels targeted for upzoning and redevelopment into so-called “luxury housing”, and who’s also familiar with the area’s extremely toxic brownfield designation, and of course, the spectacularly polluted Gowanus Canal itself.

    …And as someone who’s undergraduate and graduate studies were urban politics, urban history and urban planning and development, respectively, I agree with many of the valid questions and concerns you have contributed to this discussion regarding the risks posed to health the health of humans (and our pets) from the area’s well known, perhaps even notorious, and extensively documented history as a longtime, and mostly unregulated prior to the 1970s, dumping ground (legal, and thereafter, likely even illegal) for an array of extremely toxic chemicals, many of which includes known cancer causing carcinogens.

    I further agree that politicians who turn a blind eye to this yet to be fully remediated brownfield and instead are prioritizing developers’ greed by glossing over the threat posed by this toxic wasteland to the public’s health and safety should be called out for serving private developers’ interests instead of (selling out) the public they claim to represent, just as you have done.

    To wit, the use of (deceitful, deceptive and intentionally misleading) renderings that fail to reveal the height, bulk and density of the buildings in NY Yimby’s report has not, and should not, go unnoticed, as yet another reason to question the integrity of both the developers AND the obsequious politicians promoting this dubious project.

    Simply put, I’m expressing this as someone who mostly agrees with the issues you’ve presented that question the scale, scope, appropriateness and suitability of this type of residential development using land and abutting what are long known to be what amounts to a toxic dump (see also proposed land grab/redevelopment of auto scrap yards by well connected developers near Citifield/Willets Point):

    Please STOP repeating/reposting the same comments over and over again.

    You’ve more than made your point – many of which are spot on valid.

    But, the incessant reposting does NOT contribute anything – and likely is NOT helping advance your POV!

    Even worse, it risks, or perhaps already has, becoming so obnoxious, or even “toxic”, that instead of wining the hearts and minds of readers who are inclined to be open to making an informed opinion/decision about this proposed land grab by unscrupulous developers and politicians… er zoning changes/“upzoning” from industrial to residential… by making the compelling, fact based presentation as you originally did, has now been repeated so often, and so stridently, that people become so turned off, and the author of the otherwise excellent, well written and well researched reader comment post in its original form is seen as being difficult, argumentative, or let’s just say “overzealous” (in the not so flattering sort of way).

    Which, in fact, would be a terrible shame since the scale and scope of this development on a longtime documented brownfield/toxic dump that abuts a mostly stagnant waterway that still includes copious amounts of raw sewage (human and animal) among the overflow legally dumped into it during heavy storms rightfully **deserves to be intensely questioned and scrutinized**.

    ( Just sayin’ )

    Cheers!

  12. Howard Miller | June 18, 2021 at 12:05 pm | Reply

    CORRECTION in my above reader comment post:

    Should be 9th STREET – not 9th Ave as originally written.

    My bad – with apologies for the error and any confusion it may have caused.

  13. Howard Miller | June 18, 2021 at 12:11 pm | Reply

    Also, correcting and clarifying the following paragraph from my original reader comment post (above), as follows:

    Simply put, I’m expressing this as someone who mostly agrees with the issues you’ve presented that question the scale, scope, appropriateness and suitability of this type of residential development using land and abutting a waterway (Gowanus Canal) long known to be what amounts to a toxic dump (see also proposed taxpayer funded/subsidized land grab/redevelopment of auto scrap yards by well connected developers near Citifield/Willets Point):

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