Façade Work Continues on Santiago Calatrava’s St. Nicholas Green Orthodox Church, in Financial District

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Designed by Santiago Calatrava.

Façade work is continuing to progress on St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, a reinforced concrete structure atop the elevated Liberty Park in the Financial District. Designed by  Santiago Calatrava and developed by The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the church is found near the intersection of Greenwich Street and Liberty Street and sits above the eastern half of the vehicle security center for the World Trade Center.

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

Our last update in early May showed the first segments of the white marble going up around the center line of each side in a wide, pleated fashion. Now we can see some of the corners enclosed, while other edges are prepped with metal clips attached to the concrete walls. Crews in cherry pickers are working on all sides at different heights, including on top and within the structural frame of the dome. The cross appears to have been temporarily removed from the pinnacle, most likely as a safety precaution as installation has begun on a couple of marble panels for the dome.

Meanwhile, work is also underway on the last set of staircases on the northern edge of Liberty Park, which likely won’t open until St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church gets closer to completion. A wide arch directly beneath the staircase is now outlined with a dark stone finish and could conceivably serve as a secondary ADA-accessible entrance to bring people directly up inside the church. One other minor detail in the façade is a square window facing the 9/11 Memorial and World Trade Center complex. YIMBY expects more of the marble cladding to be delivered and installed throughout the rest of the summer and into the fall and winter months.

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

The following photographs offer a closer look at the color, texture, and veining of the marble. The white slabs are divided by thin, gray horizontal segments around the four corners of the church.

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church. Photo by Michael Young

Santiago Calatrava’s architectural concept for the church was inspired by Istanbul’s Hagia Sophia and Church of the Holy Savior of Chora. The highest point of the underside of the dome will feature a colorful painting of Jesus Christ. The main entrance will be located on the symmetrical western side of the building between two rounded cylindrical corners and underneath a curved canopy facing the rest of Liberty Park and West Street.

A completion date for St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church is unclear at the moment, though sometime in 2022 is possible.

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11 Comments on "Façade Work Continues on Santiago Calatrava’s St. Nicholas Green Orthodox Church, in Financial District"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | August 3, 2021 at 8:32 am | Reply

    Dome and sharp edges of One World Trade Center, which looks clearly contrasted; made with marble so beautiful: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. this is taking so long I wouldn’t be surprised if its just those 4-5 guys working on it.

  3. Robert Shultz | August 3, 2021 at 9:50 am | Reply

    Pictures showing the complexity of this exterior skin are spot on and anyone in the trades will appreciate. Looking forward to the illuminated final product.

  4. Looking good!

  5. Green Orthodox ?

    • Green scissor and bucket lifts, green pails, green concrete walls and green leaf landscape. Attention to details – other than the headline.

  6. “is found near the intersection of Greenwich Street and Liberty Street.” “is found” is an odd prose construction. One could say, is to be found but that even more strongly suggests an element of discovery, to chance upon something. Perhaps that was the intent but it’s not hidden nor in hiding so one could simply say, is located since it truly is there.

    • Alas, pearls before swine. When one says that a building “is found” somewhere, one is letting it be known that one thinks in French, but will obligingly speak in English in order to be understood by hoi polloi.

  7. Is there a live cam to follow the construction?
    (There used to be)

  8. David of Flushing | August 3, 2021 at 3:00 pm | Reply

    I suppose things are not as bad as when NYC buildings burned coal, but the acid air still damages carbonate stones such as marble and travertine. The design is very nice, but I hope it survives the ravages of air pollution. Granite is more durable in this regard though it lacks the luminous effect of marble.

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