Park House Nears Completion at 500 West 22nd Street in West Chelsea, Manhattan

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Rendering by Visualhouse.

Exterior work is nearing completion on Park House, an eight-story residential building at 500 West 22nd Street in West Chelsea. Alternately addressed as 197 Tenth Avenue, the 33,662-square-foot structure is designed by Annabelle Selldorf of Selldorf Architects for Brantwood Capital and will yield ten residential units and 1,959 square feet of ground-floor retail space. Compass is handling sales and marketing for the homes, which range from one- to four-bedroom units and two duplex penthouses, with pricing from $2.65 million to $12 million. The corner property is located at the intersection of Tenth Avenue and West 22nd Street, a short distance from the High Line. Foundations Group is the general contractor.

Since our last update in late May, the remainder of the scaffolding and construction netting has been removed, further revealing the two-tone brick façade.

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

With the northern fenestration along West 22nd Street revealed from behind the thick blue netting and metal scaffolding, we can better appreciate the minimalist design and bold red colors that contrast with the black grilles around the mechanical extension above the roof parapet, black-painted southern wall abutting the adjacent building, and dark window frames, heads, and sills. Only the sidewalk scaffolding remains, covering the floor-to-ceiling glass retail frontage.

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Photo by Michael Young

Daytime and nighttime renderings by VISUALHOUSE depict the eastern profile from across Tenth Avenue, the views from the roof parapet that will be home to a private terrace overlooking Chelsea and Midtown, Manhattan, and the close proximity of Park House to the High Line. Residents are located among a wide range of art galleries, retail, and dining options between the Meatpacking District to the south and Hudson Yards to the north.

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Rendering by Visualhouse.

Looking east from Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Rendering by Visualhouse.

Park House at 500 West 22nd Street. Rendering by Visualhouse.

Park House is estimated to be finished by the end of the year, or early 2022 at the latest.

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8 Comments on "Park House Nears Completion at 500 West 22nd Street in West Chelsea, Manhattan"

  1. David : Sent From Heaven. | August 26, 2021 at 9:21 am | Reply

    Would you care to take a look? Yes, I would on views were all you said in report. Structure get colored easily because it’s beautiful, everyone goes crazy for two-tone: Thanks to Michael Young.

  2. nice to see some brick

  3. You know how when there’s a catastrophic flood and there’s that mud line after the water goes down? Yeah like that…

  4. Nicely done, fits the scale of neighboring buildings and attention to detail is amazing…noticed that the new bricks line up with old bricks of building on the left! ?

  5. Very nice!

  6. It looks nice, but I with they could have added another 1-2 floors to the building so they could have actually added a few units instead of just creating larger ones.

  7. A great disappointment; contextual need not be unimaginative.
    This seems a very weak willed cut-and-paste approach to building in a historic district; couldn’t we have had a real contribution to the streetscape rather than this trifling mimicry? Is there hope that the ground floor when unveiled will somehow redeem the banality?

    • Agree absolutely. Looks like a bonded warehouse. With a finessed and nuanced design, it could still have been brick and complimentary to the neighborhood architecture. What would it have taken to get the design over the line to something elegant and distinctive?

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